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Beggining moddeling


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Hi,

hope this is in the right place as its my first post here, after been told about the site.

Looking at some of the models you have made they are really good. And i would like to start. from my moddeling past i can remeber as a child airfix kits and gluing my hands together and the stickers that you put in water that just eitehr fell part or stuck all over your hands. I have found a DH beaver kit (airfix) in the loft dont know what scale it is but it will fit on the palm of my hand i guess.

What im asking for is what would be good to get me started doing this properly, to make models like you do.

Can you reccomed something for the beginner?

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Hi Casfan,

Firstly, welcome!

This is my opinion – yes, most of us started with Airfix kits, but to be honest I'm not sure I would start with an old one of theirs now. This is simply because the fit of parts may not be as good as it should be (like many kits of the early days) and could actually get you frustrated and put you off the hobby. I would be tempted to find a pretty good kit from the off – a Revell 1/72 Hurricane is only about £3.50 or maybe their Hunter if you prefer classic jets for about £9. These are readily available but their drawback is Revell's paint guide! A couple of questions asked here – or a search in the relevant forum – will help tremendously.

As a VERY basic guide: use a modelling knife to cut off parts and use grade 1000 or so wet'n'dry ('sand')paper to clean up. Wash all parts thoroughly and dry first. Use Revell Contacta and/or Humbrol's liquid poly for glueing – experiment on bits of sprue (the 'rails' that the parts are attached to). You'll probably start by using paint brushes first (I still do) – just make sure that the paint is thinned and built up in coats. It takes time but patience is rewarded! It is best to apply a coat of gloss varnish before applying the decals ('stickers') for them to adhere to – use a brush to pick them up and apply to the model. Varnish to your chosen finish once decals are dry.

As I say, this is very basic! You'll soon be tempted into the world of weathering; the desire for the aftermarket accessory; the need to purchase an airbrush and compressor; the need to buy another kit, then another, then another. Then three more before you've finished the second. Then start worrying about accuracy . . . :wicked:

Nick

Edited by ledmex
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Hi and welcome to the forums!

I think the best thing would be to read other posts, gain a few ideas from others here, watch how others build and then just do it and enjoy yourself. Its a hobby and meant to be enjoyed :rolleyes:

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Hi and :post1:

the above advice is sound, getting started again can be frustrating don't be too worried with your first attempts, some of mine were awful. enjoyment is the main thing, build for yourself and ask for advice if needed, there is plenty of people on here willing to help. I've never failed to get an answer to a problem.

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and another thing don't wory about not getting the results we do just yet ours is all practice and technique gained over the years but you are in the right place for help advice and support

the main thing is enjoy what you are doing and post results in the critique area for pointers to help you improve..... :welcome:

mish beat me to it :thumbsup:

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Thanks all for the quick replies.

Just a few questions.

I have seen some builds on here or the aircraft been painted before its been built, is this the way to do it.

How long does it take you to build a kit? Just in the past i have tried to do it in a day which i take it is not how you do it.

Im going to start with my beaver and see what happens.

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I tend to paint smaller more detailed parts on the spure as it's easier to hold them and not loose them.

Time to complete a kit? my first too me months, no depending on the size and the complexity it can take me anything from a few hours to 20+ on average I would say 20 to 25 hours for a 1:48 kit.

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The 1/32 Swordfish I'm doing has taken me 10 months and I'm still nowhere finished! Generally I work in 1/32 scale and they usually take about 4 - 5 months to complete. You learn and get better through building. We're all learning from each other on here and we never ever stop learning new tricks. Go ahead, build and enjoy. As kids, we all wanted to get an airfix done in a day, as we get older, we look at ways of improving what we're doing. You do that by watching others, looking out for new tips and tricks and just enjoying what you're doing.

Oh, and unless you have incredibly large hands, I'd say your beaver is 1/72 :analintruder:

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Hi and welcome, one of the things that you can do to learn more is to invest in some books, when I started I discovered a great book covering the basics to more advanced techniques, I'm still using a lot of the techniques from that book. Do a search on Amazon, I just typed in Scale Models and up popped lots of "how to" type books.

I still try and learn something new on every build, one day I hope I can build THE KIT incorporating all the things that I have learned.

The big thing is to enjoy the process, it is a hobby.

Cheers

Den

Have a look here

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Scale-Aircraft-Mod...1205&sr=1-1

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Thanks again, I will have a look at the books. Is there any magazines of worth out there?

So the idea is to slowly build the kit and let each bit dry complealty and make it as nice as possible and not all in one go.

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Plan your work carefully, read as much as you can about different techniques, try to find pictures with completed models, real photos and work-in-progress pictures. They will tell you many interesting and important things.

Also I'd like to recommend you to start using airbrush from the very beginning. This will cost you some extra money and will require some time to learn how to handle it properly but the result will surely worth it. Well, it depends on the scale you prefer but as soon as you're not building 1/1200 ships I'm quite sure that airbrush is the best choice. Surely you will need hand brushes too but in my opinion it's almost impossible to paint large surface by hand without defects.

My friend presented me DKM Tirpitz in 1/350 scale more than a year ago as the birthday present, and I haven't started it yet except some minor spadework. Instead of this I bought quite simple model of Varyag cruiser and started to perfect my techniques with it -- airbrushing, aftermarket etc. It won't be a tragedy if I spoil something -- this model costs 15$ in Russia while Tirpitz costs 100$ and requires additional 200$ for PE sets.

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Welcome Casfan. Ignore all other posts, build only 1/48 post-war RAF & you'll be just fine! :evil_laugh::whistle: No, seriously, good references, good tools & plenty of light to work by are essential.

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your on the web so everything is at your fingertips in your search engine you tube is good a good one to watch for begginers was ironicaly done by a kid when on you tube look up ( box to bomber ) it is basic fast but he takes you through everything ( not the best modelling skills but it is a good demo ) other tips are shown too such as weathering etc........

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Hi,

Good advice already and really to echo that modelling is supposed to be fun so don't take it too seriously. The more models you build the more experience you will gain and learn by your mistakes (everyone makes them!)

Also if you have a few minutes spare visit Testors Scale Workshop HERE for some good tutorials and basics of getting back into modelling.

Have fun

Doc

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Actually, at my age, I wouldn't mind starting again on a beaver!! ;)

You wish!

But I agree with everyones comments,as for a starter,I'm suprised no one suggested one of those kits Revell & Airfix both do that come with knife,glue,paints & brushes.That way you'll get to know what you need & they're quite cheap too.

Merv

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Thanks for the tips so far.

Not started it yet as all i have is the kit and the glue.

Is it worth painting inside the cockpit and pilot on this model?

The version i have is either the british or us with wheels skis or floats depending on what parts i use. But im thinking of doing it as a livery that i fly on Flight sim with for a charter company. Or is this to ambitiouse for a first project.

Looking into knifes and that, how many paints will i need to start with? and will the paints differ if im going to get a air brush?

TIA

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Thanks for the tips so far.

Not started it yet as all i have is the kit and the glue.

Is it worth painting inside the cockpit and pilot on this model?

The version i have is either the british or us with wheels skis or floats depending on what parts i use. But im thinking of doing it as a livery that i fly on Flight sim with for a charter company. Or is this to ambitiouse for a first project.

Looking into knifes and that, how many paints will i need to start with? and will the paints differ if im going to get a air brush?

TIA

all paints can be used with airbrush but start with brushes first and get to grips with airbrush for weathering washes ( very thined paints ) as the cleaning routine on an airbrush is to be very thourough as it is a precision instrument

usualy your paints get built up by buying the ones needed for each kit you eventualy find yourself buying less and less as you will have accumulated a comprehensive list of colours

on smaller scales the cockpit is less critical when first starting but i would personaly paint all interior grey pilots overalls green white helmet and flesh face for a representation

if available in your area get hold of the humbrol paints colour chart this not only gives you most of the readily available humbrol colours but also gives a basic conversion chart on the rear for other paint companys products

and also why not try that charter companys livery it is all a learning curve if you feel confident enough give it a try ( whats the worst that can happen ) it may not be brilliant but it is practice

it is now the stage to get on and give it a go with all the info here for you to check and taking your time with methodical work you should be o.k.

come back with questions as you are underway

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the main thing to remember for paints is to use the correct thinners / cleaner for each paint type

1 acrylics use water for thinning and cleaning

2 humbrol enamels use humbrol thinners for thinning white spirit or turps for cleaning

3 cellulose is rarely used now but if by chance you have or get any old humbrol clear colours red green etc for clear parts like navigation lights these are a cellulose laquer paint and as such will need cellulose thinner to clean and thin ( although with the recent eec ban on cellulose paints think they may have a new formulation

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Welcome. As a relative newcomer myself I would echo the advice you have been given. Never be afraid to ask questions even if you think they are stupid. 99 times out of 100 they are not and you do tend to get quick and helpful answers. Finally I think the best advice is to join a club. The internet is a great tool but nothing can beat speaking face to face. Finally finally never forget its a hobby and you do it for fun!!

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been to the shop got a funny look when i asked if i needed acrylic or enamel paint, then i realised i had my wooly hat with a pom pom on.

Got 3 paints a white matte , silvey metal matte, and a burnt red gloss. when painting is it best to keep the finishes the same?

goint to start painting the insides then i can start slowly building

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Best source for emery boards & files?

The make up counter of the local chemists,oh & nick your missus's blusher brush! Great for dusting off models without knocking things off!

Merv

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been to the shop got a funny look when i asked if i needed acrylic or enamel paint, then i realised i had my wooly hat with a pom pom on.

Got 3 paints a white matte , silvey metal matte, and a burnt red gloss. when painting is it best to keep the finishes the same?

goint to start painting the insides then i can start slowly building

when asking about finneshes i presume you mean matt silk or gloss this depends on the finnishes of the model you are building for instance some camo finnishes are all matt some are all gloss as are civil finnishes but seldom maybe even never do you get both on the same aircraft unles painted on diffrent surface textures

for instance wartime cammo is usualy matt finnish after the war some were gloss ie meteors but modern you have satin finnishes like modern tornado f3s and early camo gr1 tornados

the clues mostly will be on photos but if you are putting in your civil liverie it will allmost deffinately be gloss

but detail parts props tyres etc would be matt black

bot if you need to use a colour thats matt that you realy needed to be gloss you can put gloss varnish over the top and vice versa to give matt or satin finishes

also if you remember to use correct things with types of paint there is no reason why you cant use enamels and acrylics on the same model just bear in mind they do not mix

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