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🇩🇰 F-100D Super Sabre, 1/32, Scratchbuild


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Happy 75 Birthday NATO 🇩🇰 

 

It is probably true to say that there is no organization in the world that I admire more than NATO.  I don't want to go into depth why since I might just get a bit 'political' and we cannot have that here,  but I am prepared to say that - in my belief- if NATO had not existed for the last 75 years, the world would be a much more dangerous place and many fewer people would enjoy security and freedom.With this in mind I think I have no choice but to take part in this most excellent group build.

 

 I really like the idea of the flags! It's unique and intriguing and might just give an incentive to folks to model some of the smaller nations that might sometimes be overlooked. ‘My’ flag is The Netherlands; however, try as I might, I cannot find a Dutch subject that grips me quite as much as a Royal Danish Air Force F-100D! Yes, a Super Sabre complete with grotty, patchy, olive-green, livery! Admit it... you know the kind of filth I mean!

 

jEYodW3.jpeg

 

Another reason to pick the Danish Air Force is that a friend of mine who collects models lives just 5km outside of Denmark and yet has not a single Danish item in his collection. (In the interests of transparency I should probably point out that I am referring to 'Denmark' the small coastal Western Australian township rather than 'Denmark' the Scandinavian constitutional monarchy - but you get the idea).

 

I really like the F-100!  It just looks so damned mean. It has to be the most shark-like looking aircraft ever made and its relatively simple geometry makes it a great subject for scratchbuilding. When I was a teenager I scratchbuilt one in roughly 1/100 scale and it came out OK, but it did not survive the various parental 'junk purges' that punctuated my many years living away from home and now - alas - it's in landfill someplace. Never mind, let's just make another one... a bigger one!

 

Here are my references...

JqEQ3nW.jpg

 

some inspiration...

R2S09Wt.jpg

 

and the raw materials!

K3WooQ7.jpg

 

I'm hoping this will be a good chance for me to practice and improve on many of the methods that i used for the first time during my - still ongoing - Mirage IIIO build.  This project I'm hoping will be relatively simple. Much of its success or failure will depend on the final painting and weathering as I'm hoping I can make this look like a jet as battered and worn as those in the pictures above.

 

But let's start at the beginning. 

 

As usual I have selected Jarrah for the fuselage and have used cheap photographic spray adhesive to stick the relevant plans on the side.

Mbq7pKd.jpg

 

Here is the very first cut of the entire project.  Shockingly that's not a bandsaw, but don't worry I will be using one very soon.

PdTPhXA.jpg

 

 

OK - here it is, the first bandsaw cut!  Let's call this the moment that the ‘project proper’ begins.  

MwnPwaj.jpg

 

To get to this shape does not take long.

U2wdwPk.jpg

 

After some sanding and general tidying up we have this...

5LJPnLl.jpg

 

Which is only the starboard half of the fuselage. I will be cutting out the port side tomorrow night.

 

I have absolutely no hope whatsoever of finishing this project within the allocated four month timespan, especially since this new build must compete with the ongoing Mirage project which must be finished by August 2024. Nevertheless I do think that in the limited time available I can probably bash together sufficient shapes so that it is unmistakably an F-100. Following that I'll just transfer this thread back to the 'main pages' and carry on to the end.

 

In the meantime I hope that this is of interest to you NATO enthusiasts and that you can all get some enjoyment out of watching my humble attempt to turn out a Danish Hun.

 

Go Team NATO!

Bandsaw Steve 

 

 

 

 

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Whoah! A totally hand carved project?!?! I am going to follow this with great interest.

Good luck and I eagerly await your next update

Cheers,
Mipps

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:analintruder:

You're gonna carve a F-100 from a piece of wood. :shocked:

This I got to see... 

Good luck with your build. 

/Bosse :popcorn: :beer: 

 

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5 hours ago, Marlin said:

:analintruder:

You're gonna carve a F-100 from a piece of wood. :shocked:

This I got to see... 

Good luck with your build. 

/Bosse :popcorn: :beer: 

 

At the risk of shameless self-promotion, if you want a sort of sneak preview of how this project might go, just click on the shortcut above.

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G'day @Bandsaw Steve, does the expression "a beggar for punishment" mean anything to you? 😁 Who-ever first coined the phrase must have had you in mind. 🙂

 

On 4/4/2024 at 10:17 PM, Bandsaw Steve said:

Here is the very first cut of the entire project.  Shockingly that's not a bandsaw,

Yeah, shock, horror, shame on you, what's the world coming to? 😲 But then you redeemed yourself shortly after.

 

Seriously, I've seen your scratch built models first hand and I have no doubt of your ability to do another superb model here. But yeah, please finish the Mirage by August. (This August).

Regards, Jeff.

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Another wooden aeroplane to follow and see it take shape!  Splendid!

 

And the F-100 has long been a favourite of mine.  In my much younger days, when the TxANG still flew them, I'd visit San Antonio and sit at the approach end of the runway at Kelly AFB to watch them flying around and landing.

 

Cheers

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8 hours ago, CH-53D said:

 

 

  In my much younger days, when the TxANG still flew them, I'd visit San Antonio and sit at the approach end of the runway at Kelly AFB to watch them flying around and landing.

 

 

That would have been a thing to see!

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I’m old enough to have seen quite a few F-100s.

The two lasting memories are watching a Danish F100 on the apron at Yeovilton changing colour as the sun went in and out, and a USAF aircraft departing  Finningy after a display, who for some reason decided not to use the afterburner and staggered off the end of the runway with only a few ft to spare.

Also eagerly awaiting the next update.

 

John

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  • Bandsaw Steve changed the title to 🇩🇰 F-100D Super Sabre, 1/32, Scratchbuild
On 4/5/2024 at 7:31 PM, Bandsaw Steve said:

That would have been a thing to see!

It really was.  The 1970s were a great a great time for an aeroplane-mad kid recently moved to America, there was such a splendid assortment of aircraft flying then. 

We lived in Corpus Christi, Texas, two miles from and almost under the approach path to the Naval Air Station, so I saw pretty much everything that flew into there, which included just about every type the Navy, and other services, operated. 

Trips to San Antonio, with the three Air Force bases there, yielded most of the USAF aircraft then in operation, which included types reaching the ends of their service careers, like F-100s, being flown by Guard and Reserve squadrons. 

Kelly AFB was a flying base, Lackland AFB had become a non-flying training base with no runways, but was adjacent to Kelly.   When the base closures happened in the 1990s, it was decided Kelly would be closed, but Lackland would remain.  The Air Force, whistling innocently, quietly extended the boundaries of Lackland AFB to encompass around 90% of what had been Kelly, and became a flying base again while Kelly AFB officially went away.

 

Cheers

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I think the seventies must have been a sort of ‘golden age’ for jet enthusiasts. Back then you could probably spot everything from the odd Korean War era jet all the way through to types that are still in service (sometimes even still in production! ) today…

 

…and they weren’t all painted grey either!
 

 

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We need a bigger bandsaw! 🦈

 

At the end of the first post I had managed to cut one half of the fuselage into this 2D outline.

5LJPnLl.jpg

 

I generally make my fuselages by temporarily joining two blocks of wood and then making just one cut around the side view shape.  Doing it this way ensures that there is a natural centerline running through the middle of the project which helps me ensure symmetry later on. Generally I can cut both halves at the same time but since this fuselage is so chunky I couldn’t fit both bits of wood into the bandsaw at once and had to work on the two halves separately. We need a bigger bandsaw! 🦈

 

Here's the second half cut out and laid up against the first half.

pTnFqRk.jpeg

 

Now I hold the two together in a vice and drill out holes for a series of small dowels that will ensure that the two halves go together in exactly the same way each time the model is assembled.

jpv5Fi6.jpeg

 

Since the two halves were not cut out at the same moment there were inevitably slight differences between the two shapes and there was quite a bit of rasp and file work required to get them both the same size and shape.

8BptrIG.jpeg

 

There was also a fair bit of sanding required to really eliminate the differences.

PRNKyao.jpeg

 

Which gave me this.

shlRqbe.jpeg

 

The next phase of work was just too ugly to photograph. Suffice to say that the plan view shape was defined by a paper cut out of the underside view stuck on the lower half of the fuselage. Then a  great deal of sawing and rasping and sanding was completed to get the plan view shape correct.  The problem was that the height of the fuselage (distance from bottom-most to the top-most surface) was too great to fit in the cutting throat of the bandsaw so I had to do this work manually using hand-saws and other such contemptible primitive methods.  Consequently, a job that should have taken about 15 minutes took a couple of hours.  We need a bigger bandsaw! 🦈

x9spcJF.jpeg

 

I got there in the end though!

AZLhdVN.jpeg

 

Here is the progress to date shot showing the F-100 parked up against the Mirage III. Both are 1/32 scale but I think you can already see just how much bigger the F-100 is. BTW the paper on top is just normal photocopier paper held in place with spray-on photo adhesive. I've found this makes a really strong really tight 'lock' between the two halves that's easily removed at any time just by wiping it with white spirits. In the photo below, the paper on the top and bottom and the handful of small dowels ensures that the whole structure is absolutely rigid; it's as if it's just one block of wood at the moment. 

ewVXLRD.jpeg

 

Anyway, all of that sawing and rasping and sanding has made me think... ‘We’re gonna need a bigger bandsaw if we want to build something as big and sharky as this!’ 🦈

 

Well - maybe not. The fuselage is probably the only part that is really going to punish us for lack of bandsaw capacity on this project. The biggest bit is under control now. From here on it's just little details like wings and tails and tailplanes and stuff that need to be built. Stay tuned folks there's plenty more NATO action to follow. 

 

Best Regards,

Bandsaw Steve

 

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1 hour ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Since the two halves were not cut out at the same moment there were inevitably slight differences between the two shapes

G'day Steve, I thought they looked very similar. But I guess you're in a better position to see. If you want to save yourself all that filing and sanding in future you might consider a bigger bandsaw. In fact, I'm surprised that you haven't thought of that yourself. 🙂

Compared to the Mirage it does look a bit chunkier. But I suppose it'll look a little slimmer with the square edges trimmed off her. Maybe a job for a bigger bandsaw.       Regards, Jeff.

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9 hours ago, ArnoldAmbrose said:

you might consider a bigger bandsaw. In fact, I'm surprised that you haven't thought of that yourself. 🙂


Maybe a job for a bigger bandsaw.       


Both good suggestions, worthy of my consideration. I should have thought of that myself! 🤔

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@Bandsaw Steve Im in awe of you're work on the Mirage so far. I hope you can get all the subtle curves of the Hun right. The nose has a particular double hump on top in front of the cockpit. 
 

https://wingsmuseum.org/exhibits/north-american-f-100d-super-sabre/

 

The first photo in the link shows the hump that Im talking about. 
 

Dennis

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1 hour ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

 I hope you can get all the subtle curves of the Hun right. The nose has a particular double hump on top in front of the cockpit. 
 

 


It is worth noting that this may be the first time in human history that the word ‘subtle’ has ever been used in any discussion regarding Super Sabres.

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Blocking-out

 

For me scratchbuilding a model is a bit like drawing a picture.  Typically an artist creating a drawing will 'block-out' the biggest shapes first and then, once the basic structure is established, will add details.  Not all artists work that way, but many do, and it's a good analogy for how I attack making models.  I start with the biggest shapes and try to cut out the blocks that will represent them. Later on I can contour those shapes and move on to finer details. I also tend to start at the center, in this case the fuselage, and work outward.

 

Since the fuselage is already 'blocked-out' it's time to start cutting out the wings, tailplanes and tail.

 

Using the 'biggest to littlest' rule of thumb, lets start with the wings.  Here I have one sheet of 6mm thick MDF with a topside and bottomside view of the wings glued on.

uBlHWX4.jpeg

 

Here I've used the bandsaw to make an initial cut-out of both the top and lower half of the wing structure. The next step will be to cut in much more closely to the final shape and then finish with a bench-mounted belt sander.  Unfortunately I took no photos for either of those two stages but I'm sure you get the idea. It's a good idea to make the wing in two pieces, an upper and lower half, because then you can contour each independently of the other and ensure that the flat plane between upper and lower remains completely consistent.

TBxN6ex.jpeg

 

For the vertical tail I spot-glued two sheets of 3mm MDF together and stuck on an outline of the tail plus a deep 'root' or 'base' to the tail that will set into the fuselage and will be used to attach the whole structure.  I then cut the tail outline out using a scroll-saw. You do not need a scroll-saw for this kind of work - a coping saw would handle this easily - but using a power-tool does save time.

Note that when I glued the two sheets together I ensured that none of the glue was within the area defined by the tail outline. This way, once the cut was complete, the tail naturally split into two 3mm thick halves. This - once again - creates a centreline for me to work to. 

MxrhM0n.jpeg

 

For the tailplanes I chose to use a single layer of high-quality plywood.  The F-100's tailplane was a very thin structure, so to ensure that it was strong enough to withstand handling, I chose plywood, which is much better than MDF in this regard. There could be some minor complications with this choice when I come to taper this structure but I'm confident I can manage.

Bb9AwzK.jpeg

 

Here is the empennage as it currently stands. Obviously the tail looks weird because it has not yet been set into the center of the fuselage.   

lz5TEqs.jpeg

 

Here's the current state of play of this project.

0bUDlTJ.jpeg

 

 

The biggest shapes are now 'blocked out'. The next step will be to cut rebates into the fuselage so that each of these pieces fit together in the correct way making a rudimentary 3D 'picture' of an F-100. In the meantime, if you blur your eyes and stand well back it's almost starting to look like... something. 👍

AtfXQ41.jpeg

 

Stay with me NATO potatoes!

 

Best Regards,
Bandsaw Steve

 

 

 

 

 

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       G'day Steve, it doesn't take you long before the general shape of your models begin to manifest themselves. Although at present she's looking a bit 'angular'. 😁 I'm sure you'll rectify that in due course and make her look a little more curvaceous. Regards, Jeff.

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4 hours ago, Biggles87 said:

Definitely taking on the shape, have you tried gliding it yet?  😁

Probably not until Steve gets steel-capped boots. 😁

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21 hours ago, Biggles87 said:

Definitely taking on the shape, have you tried gliding it yet?  😁

 

John


No, but my guess is it would glide just about as well as a real F-100! 

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Nozzle and intake.

 

Experience has taught me that when building these models there are several things that are best done early on.  Now is the best time to cut any rebates that are needed to hold any major structures in place and it's also the best time to complete any work that makes use of access to the centreline. In this case  cutting the nozzle and the intake.

 

The biggest - almost disastrous - mistake that i made on the Mirage project was when I drilled out the jet exhaust nozzle and the two halves of the fuselage slipped relative to one another causing the spade bit to almost rip out a large chunk of the rear fuselage. On this project i therefore decided to complete this high risk drilling early on in the project. This way, if it goes badly I can start again with minimal loss or at least have the best possible chance of correcting it.

 

Here's the initial mark-up.  Here you can see just how useful it is to have a natural centreline to ensure that the drill is centered correctly. 

9ChvrZV.jpg

 

It even looks like a high risk operation.  Next time I think I might even drill out the exhaust nozzle before cutting out the basic fuselage shape; just to be sure.

Ac8vB5H.jpg

 

 

The two halves of the fuselage are firmly held together with dowels and glued-on paper (which is remarkably strong) but just to be sure that nothing slips I've also bound the two halves together with wrapped layers of masking tape which you can see in this photo.

When using a spade bit for delicate work like this, I aways start by running the drill backwards, this cuts a circular scoring mark on the surface of the wood that prevents it chipping-out when the actual drilling begins.

IQozZZF.jpg

 

Drill slowly and carefully and a few minutes later you will - hopefully - have a nice circular hole in exactly the correct spot.

lB7uDxq.jpg

 It looks tidy this time.

VAN9isa.jpg

 

Splitting the model in half like this allows us to see how it went & I'm thinking this time things went well.

Mvaftdz.jpg

 

At the opposite end of the aircraft is the air intake. This is a highly visible and very distinctive component of the F-100 and is likely to be the most difficult part of the entire project. Getting this right is 'make-or-break' on this model and frankly I'm not sure i can get the intake 'lips' sufficiently sharp and accurate using only wood. I do have a 'plan B' in mind,  but for now, 'plan A' goes like this... 

 

Stick a paper pattern showing the required shape on the front of the jet and drill a chain of small holes about 1mm inside that perimeter as shown below.

wTjKeeP.jpg

 

Then drill out a dense pattern of small holes scattered throughout the entire volume within the chain drilling.

K8nd5jv.jpg

 

Once we separate the two fuselage halves we can drill more holes at 90 degrees to the first set. This creates a weakened volume of wood that is prepared for removal.

XmjFuVj.jpg

 

The removal itself can be done with a chisel...

mYObgoQ.jpg

 

or a Dremmel tool. 

uyE2dEW.jpg

 

At this point we have the first signs of an intake. So far the intake's aperture has been intentionally made too small. Once the external contouring of the fuselage is complete I will return to slowly - very slowly - enlarging this hole and sharpening its leading edges. 

M1gsql2.jpg

 

There's been a lot more than this going on with this project, especially various rebates being cut for major structures such as the wings and tail surfaces but all that can wait for another post.

For now though, this jet has a rudimentary intake and nozzle and that's enough to keep me happy.

 

See you soon,

Bandsaw Steve.

 

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