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Recommendations for Kits to Practice on


Philly1860

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I haven't built a model for over 40 years and am getting back into hobby.  Collecting Stash and almost complete and waiting on new house to be completed so I can start.  I'll be modelling mostly Irish Air Corps (IAC) aircraft in scale 1/72 & 1/48 with a mixture of Bi planes, propellor and Jet Fixed wing and some Rotary ones as well.

 

Can anyone recommend what would be a good kit(s) to practice on as I don't want to mess up my stash getting my techniques up to par, IAC colour schemes are quite simple and weathering won't be too complicated either or does it really matter?

 

Regards

Colin

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Colin, Good for you, it sounds like a great project.

If you were in the UK I'd say go onto ebay and buy cheap kits from the 'used plastic model kits' to practice on.

But with your location it depends on what you have available over there. Is there a local hobby shop or will it all be mail order?

I'd still go for cheap, it doesn't matter if you mess it up so much, and you have a steep learning curve to climb.

Filling seams and painting are the main things to learn. Acrylic paints are a good starting point too. Safe and fairly easy to use. Brush paint of airbrush?

So, Airfix, Matchbox, Revell, Monogram. Check out yard sales etc. Grandpa may have just died and left his stash behind!

Good luck

 

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Like Pete says, the most cheapo Airfix, or what's commonly available round your way.

I'd just stick one together straight out of the box ASAP to get the feel of what it's like to assemble a plastic kit again, without stressing to much about it 😁

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It is rather a daunting prospect to be starting over again, particularly since almost everything has changed since I last built a model c.1994.  I packed up my modelling room that year to move house, and subsequently with life, kids, and career I never got around to setting up again.  Getting into restoring 1/1 scale military vehicles took up a lot of my "hobby" time too.

Now that I am in the last house I ever intend to occupy, I shall start afresh. 

But instead of brushes and good old Humbrol enamel paints, I shall be experimenting with the airbrush and these acrylic paint incarnations to see what I can produce.

 

Let us know how you progress, so we can hopefully learn a few things, and perhaps make the odd encouraging remark.  😉

 

And if I haven't sent you those promised 1/48 IAC decals fairly soon, don't be bashful about reminding me, I have a memory like a sieve about such things.

 

Cheers

Edited by CH-53D
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11 hours ago, Pete in Lincs said:

Colin, Good for you, it sounds like a great project.

If you were in the UK I'd say go onto ebay and buy cheap kits from the 'used plastic model kits' to practice on.

But with your location it depends on what you have available over there. Is there a local hobby shop or will it all be mail order?

I'd still go for cheap, it doesn't matter if you mess it up so much, and you have a steep learning curve to climb.

Filling seams and painting are the main things to learn. Acrylic paints are a good starting point too. Safe and fairly easy to use. Brush paint of airbrush?

So, Airfix, Matchbox, Revell, Monogram. Check out yard sales etc. Grandpa may have just died and left his stash behind!

Good luck

 

 

9 hours ago, Pig of the Week said:

Like Pete says, the most cheapo Airfix, or what's commonly available round your way.

I'd just stick one together straight out of the box ASAP to get the feel of what it's like to assemble a plastic kit again, without stressing to much about it 😁

 

1 hour ago, CH-53D said:

It is rather a daunting prospect to be starting over again, particularly since almost everything has changed since I last built a model c.1994.  I packed up my modelling room that year to move house, and subsequently with life, kids, and career I never got around to setting up again.  Getting into restoring 1/1 scale military vehicles took up a lot of my "hobby" time too.

Now that I am in the last house I ever intend to occupy, I shall start afresh. 

But instead of brushes and good old Humbrol enamel paints, I shall be experimenting with the airbrush and these acrylic paint incarnations to see what I can produce.

 

Let us know how you progress, so we can hopefully learn a few things, and perhaps make the odd encouraging remark.  😉

 

And if I haven't sent you those promised 1/48 IAC decals fairly soon, don't be bashful about reminding me, I have a memory like a sieve about such things.

 

Cheers

That's what I was thinking and have a few cheap ones in the stash to start on to brush-up or realistically learn from scratch the skills I'll need.  Thanks for confirming.

 

I will do Rory.

 

Thanks all for the replies, reinforced what I was thinking, just need to check there wasn't something I was missing.  Going to take it baby steps and to answer your question Pete Hairy Stick to begin with, airbrushing will be later I have a 1/350 kit of the USS Kitty Hawk to do (huge Aircraft carrier) that I think will need airbrushing.

 

Regards

Colin

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15 hours ago, Philly1860 said:

Can anyone recommend what would be a good kit(s) to practice on as I don't want to mess up my stash getting my techniques up to par,

Do you want ones IAC related?

 

I'm not up what will be easily available in the US,  you likely want cheaper kits.   But if you did models 40 year ago, the fundamentals have not changed.

There are more add ons, and modern kits often fit extremely well, so much so that if not cleaned up properly they don't!

 

A suggestion, find a kit, or kits,  you did 'back then' that you enjoyed, have a search to see how it fares, and get those.

 

As a pretty fool proof building experience Tamiya are noted for ease and accuracy of construction,  and older kits maybe available cheap,  worth having a look on ebay or US model sites,  Hyperscale Plane Trading has a large US membership, and you maybe able to get some now 'obsolete' kits to practice on, things now replaced by some wonder kit.   The old tool Spitfire is a good example.

 

Or just don't worry,  work on the principle a modern $20 or $30 kit is a small price to pay for the learning.

 

Speaking as someone who built up a vast stash waiting for the right moment and space etc,  and ended up building a model in the kitchen aiming purely to get it finished.

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235052380-hurricane-airfix-72nd-fabric-wing-mki-oob/

It has it's faults, but I was pleased with how the washes and decal application went, and the oil leak.  And it was finished.

 

15 hours ago, Philly1860 said:

IAC colour schemes are quite simple and weathering won't be too complicated either or does it really matter?

Weathering can easily be over done, but some signs of use, and careful use of washes can make a model less toy like.    But it's up to you.

 

This is why I have a sig line on what works for you, it easy to get intimidated by new techniques and materials,  some are just fashion. (see Youtube, full of examples of this, superficially impressive models that are factually wrong)

 

Personally I use acrylic brushed, then use oil paint dissolved in lighter fuel for washes and stains, and pastel chalk for exhaust deposits.  

I do use Kleer to dip canopies and a gloss coat,  and like superglue. (it was very expensive in my youth) 

The new tools I  use compared to 'back then' are ones I mostly should have had 'back then'  pin vice, tweezers, vernier caliper. foam backed sanding pads,  though I also use 4 grade pad sold for doing fingernails.   Mr Surfacer is useful.  

 

I just did a pretty much OOB build of a retro Frog kit in IAC colours which may amuse.

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235136191-hawker-hurricane-iic-f171f188-novo-78104/

 

The worst that will happen is that it will go wrong, and even then you will have a paint and technique mule to practice on, which are always useful, I'd say essential,  as you really want to test out things on something that doesn't matter!

 

HTH

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Troy, I like your Frog(ish) IAC Hurricane!

 

Coincidentally, the first model I ever built was a Frog Hurricane as a kid in Ireland. 

All the bits were scattered in a drawer with a load of other stuff belonging to a friend's older brother.  Said older brother told me I was welcome to dig them out and take them.  I got the decals and part of the box, but no instruction sheet, I figured out the build from looking at the pictures. 

For the markings, I carefully cut each one out of the sheet with small scissors, and glued them to the aeroplane, I had no idea they were supposed to be dipped in water first!

I still have that wretched looking thing in a box somewhere.

 

Cheers

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7 hours ago, Troy Smith said:

Do you want ones IAC related?

 

I'm not up what will be easily available in the US,  you likely want cheaper kits.   But if you did models 40 year ago, the fundamentals have not changed.

There are more add ons, and modern kits often fit extremely well, so much so that if not cleaned up properly they don't!

 

A suggestion, find a kit, or kits,  you did 'back then' that you enjoyed, have a search to see how it fares, and get those.

 

As a pretty fool proof building experience Tamiya are noted for ease and accuracy of construction,  and older kits maybe available cheap,  worth having a look on ebay or US model sites,  Hyperscale Plane Trading has a large US membership, and you maybe able to get some now 'obsolete' kits to practice on, things now replaced by some wonder kit.   The old tool Spitfire is a good example.

 

Or just don't worry,  work on the principle a modern $20 or $30 kit is a small price to pay for the learning.

 

Speaking as someone who built up a vast stash waiting for the right moment and space etc,  and ended up building a model in the kitchen aiming purely to get it finished.

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235052380-hurricane-airfix-72nd-fabric-wing-mki-oob/

It has it's faults, but I was pleased with how the washes and decal application went, and the oil leak.  And it was finished.

 

Weathering can easily be over done, but some signs of use, and careful use of washes can make a model less toy like.    But it's up to you.

 

This is why I have a sig line on what works for you, it easy to get intimidated by new techniques and materials,  some are just fashion. (see Youtube, full of examples of this, superficially impressive models that are factually wrong)

 

Personally I use acrylic brushed, then use oil paint dissolved in lighter fuel for washes and stains, and pastel chalk for exhaust deposits.  

I do use Kleer to dip canopies and a gloss coat,  and like superglue. (it was very expensive in my youth) 

The new tools I  use compared to 'back then' are ones I mostly should have had 'back then'  pin vice, tweezers, vernier caliper. foam backed sanding pads,  though I also use 4 grade pad sold for doing fingernails.   Mr Surfacer is useful.  

 

I just did a pretty much OOB build of a retro Frog kit in IAC colours which may amuse.

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235136191-hawker-hurricane-iic-f171f188-novo-78104/

 

The worst that will happen is that it will go wrong, and even then you will have a paint and technique mule to practice on, which are always useful, I'd say essential,  as you really want to test out things on something that doesn't matter!

 

HTH

Thanks Troy appreciate all your insights and advice.

 

Colin

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