Jump to content

The fastest steam locomotive in the world


Recommended Posts

Having repainted the wheels, I reassembled the driving axles, taking care to quarter the wheels properly.

 

spacer.png

 

The leading truck was glued to a piece of sprue using Araldite Rapid.  The Cartazzi truck was screwed into poistion.

 

spacer.png

 

Well, the colour issue is resolved. :thumbsup:  This is Railmatch 622.  I'm still polishing the valances.

 

spacer.png

 

Handrail knobs were added with handrails from 0.4mm copper wire.  If this were a brass kit, it would be easy to attach the handrails, as they could simply be soldered into place.  Can't do that with a plastic bodyshell...   :lol:    The handrails still need a bit of tidying up.  I have also added steps to the rear of the tender.

 

spacer.png

 

Coupling rods added.  All the time spent carefully quartering the wheels paid off as the rods fitted perfectly on both sides.  The cylinders have also been fitted.

 

spacer.png

 

There is still significant work to be done on the chassis.  It looks very bare behind the drivers, but a keeper plate with the springs and brake rigging will solve that.  If you have a low enough viewpoint you can see daylight above the Cartazzi truck, so that needs to be sorted.

 

 

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All seems to be going well for you here boss. Nice work.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

The valve gear was then added.  As a Hornby spare, it all comes as two seperate assemblies.  They were easy to fit, once I had opened up the slots in the cylinder rear faces.  I still need to close the gap above the Cartazzi truck.

 

spacer.png

 

Let's move on to the tender.  The wheels were painted with Lifecolor UA-821.  The buffer beam on the tender chassis was masked off and the chassis assembly was given a coat of Tamiya XF-69 to take away the plasticky sheen.

 

spacer.png

 

The tender components ready to be joined.   Just visible is the semi-depleted coal load.   I will show better photos of that later on.  

 

spacer.png

 

Preliminary assembly.  

 

That bent handrail really needs some attention!

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks great! I may have missed this: Are the chrome-steel wheels made of metal or is this chrome colour?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 5/20/2024 at 3:32 PM, Toryu said:

Looks great! I may have missed this: Are the chrome-steel wheels made of metal or is this chrome colour?

AFAIK most model locos available on the more recent UK market have/had this type of metal wheel (I have not bought one for 30 years so they may have changed) - they form part of the electrical pick-up system and are perhaps nickel/silver. When I bothered to weather my locos I darkened up the outer surfaces but left the part that was in contact with the track unpainted. The old Airfix tender drive on my LMS 4F 0-6-0 was unusual in having spoked black plastic wheels as they did not pick up electricity, but Hornby ones were either metal or perhaps plastic with a metal tyre as they formed one side of the electrical circuit. On the real A4 I believe the outer faces of the rims/tyres would have been red. Some old Hornby Dublo locos used a different type of metal alloy for the wheels which was a greyer colour but they seem to have a habit of degrading for some reason and becoming brittle (aka "wheel rot"),  as I found out when repairing one for a friend many years ago.

 

Pete

Edited by PeterB
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 20/05/2024 at 15:32, Toryu said:

Looks great! I may have missed this: Are the chrome-steel wheels made of metal or is this chrome colour?

 

As @PeterB said, they are metal to enable pick-up of current from the track.  However, in this case the driving, bogie and tender wheels were all from different sources so I sprayed them all silver so that they would match and then painted the spokes/centres.

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, PeterB said:

When I bothered to weather my locos I darkened up the outer surfaces but left the part that was in contact with the track unpainted.

 

On the real A4 I believe the outer faces of the rims/tyres would have been red.

 

 

 

There are some solutions available which will darken the metal but leave the electrical conductivity unaffected. 

 

As preserved, Mallard has the wheel rims in chrome.  I don't know whether that was true on the day of the speed record but I've gone with it anyway.  :) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Enzo the Magnificent said:

 

 

There are some solutions available which will darken the metal but leave the electrical conductivity unaffected. 

 

As preserved, Mallard has the wheel rims in chrome.  I don't know whether that was true on the day of the speed record but I've gone with it anyway.  :) 

Fair enough

 

Pete

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Excellent subject Enzo and coming along a treat,when My Dad was demobbed at the end of the war he did a few jobs while settling back into civvy street one was at the loco sheds

in Gateshead and one of his tasks was the lighting of the boilers ready for the engine's daily work mallard was one of the more famous footplates he stood on.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...