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F163 - Vickers Vimy - Across the Atlantic with Alcock and Brown


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13 hours ago, R T Fishall said:

I’ve been reading the Instructions in readiness to get building and there’s one thing that’s jumped out at me. The FROG Vimy appears to have a nosewheel (parts 39, 40, and 41) but I’ve checked period photos and there doesn’t appear to be a nose wheel on Alcock and Brown’s Vimy at the time of their flight, nor is there one on the Vimy in Science Museum now.

 

Is this a known issue with the FROG kit? It seems an odd mistake to make given the actual aircraft is on public display, unless when the Vimy was reassembled after the crash at the end of the crossing it had a nosewheel added which has since been removed (It looks like there may have been a restoration in the early 60’s)? Or did the Vimy originally have a nosewheel when it was built by Vickers but this got left off when it was re-assembled in Newfoundland after being shipped over?

 

I’ll be leaving the nosewheel off my build, that’s three more parts I don’t need to worry about sifting through 2 kits worth of loose items to find…

 

 

Makes a lot of sense, I'm guessing pigmented dope would have added to the weight and they were trying to keep everything as light as possible. Perhaps that 60's restoration may have used pigmented dope to counter colour changes of the linen over time.

 

The colour looks very light in all the period photos; I'll probably blend some paint to my best guess or layer up thin coats of greys, whites and creams. I'll have a play!
 

 

Thanks very much for the offer Pete, I may take you up on that.


Oddly, the first thing that sprang to my mind when I thought of Alcock and Brown's Vimy was a scene from a Children’s encyclopedia I had (I may still have it somewhere...); it had an article on the Atlantic crossing and a picture showing Brown climbing onto the wing to knock ice off during the flight. I’m sure that showed the Vimy as a Khaki Brown, but then no one said Children’s encyclopedias had to be accurate; or indeed my memory of them...

Cheers,

 

Richard.

Hi Richard,

 

Production Vimy's had a skid under the nose but the A&B version did not, perhaps to save weight. As it turned out they may have been better leaving it on as they still had fuel for another 800 miles (according to at least one source) when they made their landing in what turned out to be a bog - apparently the next field was firm ground so they were unlucky. Whether or not the skid would have stopped them nosing over or just made it worse I don't know!

 

Pete

13 hours ago, R T Fishall said:

I’ve been reading the Instructions in readiness to get building and there’s one thing that’s jumped out at me. The FROG Vimy appears to have a nosewheel (parts 39, 40, and 41) but I’ve checked period photos and there doesn’t appear to be a nose wheel on Alcock and Brown’s Vimy at the time of their flight, nor is there one on the Vimy in Science Museum now.

 

Is this a known issue with the FROG kit? It seems an odd mistake to make given the actual aircraft is on public display, unless when the Vimy was reassembled after the crash at the end of the crossing it had a nosewheel added which has since been removed (It looks like there may have been a restoration in the early 60’s)? Or did the Vimy originally have a nosewheel when it was built by Vickers but this got left off when it was re-assembled in Newfoundland after being shipped over?

 

I’ll be leaving the nosewheel off my build, that’s three more parts I don’t need to worry about sifting through 2 kits worth of loose items to find…

 

 

Makes a lot of sense, I'm guessing pigmented dope would have added to the weight and they were trying to keep everything as light as possible. Perhaps that 60's restoration may have used pigmented dope to counter colour changes of the linen over time.

 

The colour looks very light in all the period photos; I'll probably blend some paint to my best guess or layer up thin coats of greys, whites and creams. I'll have a play!
 

 

Thanks very much for the offer Pete, I may take you up on that.


Oddly, the first thing that sprang to my mind when I thought of Alcock and Brown's Vimy was a scene from a Children’s encyclopedia I had (I may still have it somewhere...); it had an article on the Atlantic crossing and a picture showing Brown climbing onto the wing to knock ice off during the flight. I’m sure that showed the Vimy as a Khaki Brown, but then no one said Children’s encyclopedias had to be accurate; or indeed my memory of them...

Cheers,

 

Richard.

Hi Richard,

 

Production Vimy's had a skid under the nose but the A&B version did not, perhaps to save weight. As it turned out they may have been better leaving it on as they still had fuel for another 800 miles (according to at least one source) when they made their landing in what turned out to be a bog - apparently the next field was firm ground so they were unlucky. Whether or not the skid would have stopped them nosing over or just made it worse I don't know!

 

Pete

13 hours ago, R T Fishall said:

I’ve been reading the Instructions in readiness to get building and there’s one thing that’s jumped out at me. The FROG Vimy appears to have a nosewheel (parts 39, 40, and 41) but I’ve checked period photos and there doesn’t appear to be a nose wheel on Alcock and Brown’s Vimy at the time of their flight, nor is there one on the Vimy in Science Museum now.

 

Is this a known issue with the FROG kit? It seems an odd mistake to make given the actual aircraft is on public display, unless when the Vimy was reassembled after the crash at the end of the crossing it had a nosewheel added which has since been removed (It looks like there may have been a restoration in the early 60’s)? Or did the Vimy originally have a nosewheel when it was built by Vickers but this got left off when it was re-assembled in Newfoundland after being shipped over?

 

I’ll be leaving the nosewheel off my build, that’s three more parts I don’t need to worry about sifting through 2 kits worth of loose items to find…

 

 

Makes a lot of sense, I'm guessing pigmented dope would have added to the weight and they were trying to keep everything as light as possible. Perhaps that 60's restoration may have used pigmented dope to counter colour changes of the linen over time.

 

The colour looks very light in all the period photos; I'll probably blend some paint to my best guess or layer up thin coats of greys, whites and creams. I'll have a play!
 

 

Thanks very much for the offer Pete, I may take you up on that.


Oddly, the first thing that sprang to my mind when I thought of Alcock and Brown's Vimy was a scene from a Children’s encyclopedia I had (I may still have it somewhere...); it had an article on the Atlantic crossing and a picture showing Brown climbing onto the wing to knock ice off during the flight. I’m sure that showed the Vimy as a Khaki Brown, but then no one said Children’s encyclopedias had to be accurate; or indeed my memory of them...

Cheers,

 

Richard.

Hi Richard,

 

Production Vimy's had a skid under the nose but the A&B version did not, perhaps to save weight. As it turned out they may have been better leaving it on as they still had fuel for another 800 miles (according to at least one source) when they made their landing in what turned out to be a bog - apparently the next field was firm ground so they were unlucky. Whether or not the skid would have stopped them nosing over or just made it worse I don't know!

 

Pete

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On 18/01/2024 at 12:24, PeterB said:

As it turned out they may have been better leaving it on as they still had fuel for another 800 miles

 

They were worried (unnecessarily) that the rival Handley Page aircraft might have left Newfoundland at about the same time and could conceivably be ahead of them headed for England. Touching down first, anywhere in the British Isles was all that was needed to win the £10,000 prize so they landed asap in the first flat green field, which turned out to be a bog but that was irrelevant. 

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Thanks all!

 

I did some further digging. The modified Vimy kit that FROG and NOVO released as the Vimy Bomber Mk. IV does include the skid under the nose, which ties in with what @PeterB and @AdrianMF said.

 

FROG weren’t making up the nosewheel up, it was definitely on the Alcock and Brown Vimy at one point. There’s a photo, that appears to be one of the most common period photos of that Vimy, that shows it with it. Now, despite this image being all over the place I’ve had trouble tracking down the original source. However the image library below has the picture with the note “The nosewheel shown here was removed for the actual flight to save weight and reduce drag.” but of course no source for either the photo or the note...

 

https://www.granger.com/results.asp?image=0013090&itemw=4&itemf=0001&itemstep=1&itemx=3

 

I’m guessing that “As Built” at Vickers it had the nosewheel and that photo was taken there. Then it got removed (or left off “As Reassembled” once in Newfoundland) for the flight. Here’s a photo presumably taken not long before the flight showing that, like Macavity, it's not there.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transatlantic_flight_of_Alcock_and_Brown#/media/File:Captain_John_Alcock_stowing_provisions_aboard_Vickers_Vimy_aircraft_before_trans-Atlantic_flight_Jun_14_1919.jpg

 

4 hours ago, Bertie McBoatface said:

They were worried (unnecessarily) that the rival Handley Page aircraft might have left Newfoundland at about the same time and could conceivably be ahead of them headed for England. Touching down first, anywhere in the British Isles was all that was needed to win the £10,000 prize so they landed asap in the first flat green field, which turned out to be a bog but that was irrelevant. 

This is the sort of little nugget I like, if the competion rules just say you've got to land, well, just whack yourself down as soon as you're sure you've hit the British Isles! Thanks Bertie!

 

I’ve never really looked beyond the basics of this flight before but having started I’m really keen to learn more. The video below is an interesting overview, and I like the inclusion of the little notes they passed each other during the flight, especially “This is a great trip, no ships, no stars or anything. Have a Sandwich?”

 

https://www.rafstories.org/story/raf-wp-16278#

 

I’ve ordered a book, Brendan Lynch’s Yesterday We Were In America: Alcock and Brown, First to Fly the Atlantic Non-Stop to see what it has to say.

 

Slowly pootling along with the build, adding some greebles into the cockpit to just make it a little more interesting than the 'Seat and Stick' FROG provide. I'll be leaving out the figures but the cockpit does appear to be a delightful red brown wood (it looks like mahogany to me but I'm not an expert) so it should add a tiny splash of colour to things!

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Neither the Windsock book not the entry in the Putnam's Vickers book have any pictures/plans showing a nosewheel on any Vimy, though a double nosewheel was fitted to the heavier Vimy Commercial. The only mention of a nosewheel in either source is the comment that the nosewheel on the A & B one (which was the 13th post war production one taken off the production line apparently) was removed before take-off to reduce both weight and drag. We know that all military equipment was removed to save weight and that extra fuel tankage was fitted, but there is no mention of the normal skid being given a wheel so maybe that was to help with ground handling?

 

Pete

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48 minutes ago, R T Fishall said:

This is the sort of little nugget I like, if the competion rules just say you've got to land, well, just whack yourself down as soon as you're sure you've hit the British Isles! Thanks Bertie!


I just happen to have read an essay on the flight within the last two days. That makes me an expert for the next two days and then I’ll have forgotten it all. 😄

 

Here’s another nugget for you. The last thing that the irrepressible Alcock said to his ground crew before they started the engines for the trip. And bear in mind that pilot and navigator were actually seated side-by-side.

 

“Here we go lads, Alcock in front and Brown behinds.”

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R T, looking forward to when you start fiddling with the Vimy. I have three builds to do but then may do a Vimy Commercial. Frog Vimy wings and tail 😊

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This is the Vimy Commercial kit that I'm referring to. Has Frog wings engines and tail. I'm not trying to hijack this post but just putting it out for all to see.

Fty

 

Fty

 

Fty

 

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My mistake - the commercial did have only a single nosewheel not the two I had thought!:banghead:

 

Pete

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The Vimy was the first aircraft to fly from UK to Australia as well as the first across the pond. That was in 1919, crewed by the Australian Macpherson-Smith brothers. It wasn't in one go though 😁 They needed fifteen flights, totalling 136 hours approx to win another £10,000.

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On a cycling holiday in Ireland a few year ago I visited Clifden. Being the first there ahead of my friends I was wracking my brains over a well earned pint as to why the name was familiar. It was only when I stood upI looked down the road and saw the “Alcock & Brown” hotel 😊

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Who wouldn’t stop for a pint there… that’s just oozing with aviation historical importance. 
Nice to see the parts for the Vimy Commercial, I didn’t know it had decals for an RAF version? 
So can this kit be built up as a Vickers Vernon (if my Vickers naming convention is correct)? 
 

Cheers.. Dave 
 

 

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2 hours ago, Adrian Hills said:

Dave, Yes there are two decal options for a Vernon 🙂


Nice, a type operated by my favourite RAF Squadron (No.45), I probably should consider getting one of these one day. 

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On 1/22/2024 at 5:04 AM, Bertie McBoatface said:

The Vimy was the first aircraft to fly from UK to Australia as well as the first across the pond. That was in 1919, crewed by the Australian Macpherson-Smith brothers. It wasn't in one go though 😁 They needed fifteen flights, totalling 136 hours approx to win another £10,000.

That Vimy, G-EAOU (God ‘elp all of us) is preserved here at Adelaide Airport.  It has recently been renovated and rehoused in the new terminal, I must go and check it out.

 

AW

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Some actual modelling has been going on.

 

PXL_20240126_215950667~2.jpg

I’ve finished greebling up the cockpit and slapped some paint around. It’s very roughly based (It's only got to give the impression of the cockpit!) on a picture of the Vimy Cockpit as it now is in the Science Museum.While entirely trusting preserved aircraft is not always wise from everything I’ve seen the Science Museum hasn’t really mucked about much with it; there might have been some work done in the 1960’s but otherwise it’s pretty much as it was when it was transferred there from Vickers once they’d rebuilt it after the momentous landing in Ireland.

 

https://www.diomedia.com/stock-photo-the-cockpit-of-alcock-and-browns-vickers-vimy-aircraft-1919-image5521064.html

 

I’ll be leaving things there I think, a trial closure of the fuselage told me what I expected; there’s little of the cockpit to be seen (except from extreme angles) so much more effort won’t be worthwhile. I'll tidy up the leather cockpit rims when the whole aircraft gets painted.

 

PXL_20240126_215624959~2.jpg

 

PXL_20240126_215719076~2.jpg

 

In fact, the bit most visible is the seats where I think my attempt to represent the buttoned leather seat cushions has been a little too heavy handed.


PXL_20240126_215804211~2.jpg

 

Engine pods next I think.

My copy of Brendan Lynch’s Yesterday We Were In America: Alcock and Brown, First to Fly the Atlantic Non-Stop arrived the other day from an online second hand book seller. Signed by the author and everything!

In the process of reading it through but already really engrossed in the story. I didn’t realise quite how much of a competition it was to get across the Atlantic from Newfoundland; 4 aircraft in the running, three of them named ‘Atlantic’! (The Handley Page entry was a V/1500 called Atlantic, the Sopwith entry was the Sopwith Atlantic, the Vimy is apparently referred to as the ‘Atlantic Vimy’ in the surviving Vickers paperwork (although a lot about the origins of this particular Vimy appears to be disputed); only Martinsyde venturing for something different with their Raymor (named after the crew, Freddie Raynham and Captain Morgan (Not he of the Rum…)))

Thanks @PeterB for mentioning the Putnam’s book on Vickers aircraft. I do have a copy in my library and pulled it out. Interestingly there’s a photo in there of the Vickers works showing the Prototype Vimy Commercial under construction at the same time as the Atlantic Vimy. That does make me think that the nose wheel for the Atlantic Vimy was probably related to the one on the Vimy Commercial. I’m wondering if it was fitted just for some of the test flights in England (possibly to help prevent nosing over during tests?) No point damaging the aircraft in a dodgy landing when Vickers were in rather a rush as other contenders for the transatlantic flight were already in Newfoundland while they were still building their aircraft.  

       

On 23/01/2024 at 23:18, Andwil said:
On 21/01/2024 at 18:34, Bertie McBoatface said:

The Vimy was the first aircraft to fly from UK to Australia as well as the first across the pond. That was in 1919, crewed by the Australian Macpherson-Smith brothers. It wasn't in one go though 😁 They needed fifteen flights, totalling 136 hours approx to win another £10,000.

That Vimy, G-EAOU (God ‘elp all of us) is preserved here at Adelaide Airport.  It has recently been renovated and rehoused in the new terminal, I must go and check it out.

 

Come on folks, just because I've got most of the parts to build another Vimy doesn't mean it's fair to dangle tempting ideas like that in front of me! Looks like that Vimy wasn't much modified from the standard Bomber version, even down to the paint?

 

@Adrian Hills Hope you do get around to building the Vimy Commercial, whether it’s done in Civilian or Vernon guise. I’ve always had a soft spot for the tubby Vickers transports of the period, especially the Valentia, not too distant descendent, which apparently was actually used as a bomber in early WWII! I’m sure I remember a Commando Comic featuring one.

 

Thank you as well for those pictures of Clifden; remarkably Alcock actually joked before the flight that “we shall hang our hats on the aerials of the Clifden wireless station as we go by!”. They were aiming for that part of Ireland, with the plan apparently being to touch down to win the prize then have a kip, check the aircraft over and finally fly home to Brooklands. There’s a comment in Lynch’s book from Steve Fossett, who reenacted the flight in a replica Vimy in 2005; “During the flight they only got three usable sextant shots. Yet, they flew and navigated the longest distance flown by man up to then. And, after 16 hours and almost 1,900 miles, they landed just a few miles off course.”

Just amazing.

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16 minutes ago, R T Fishall said:

my attempt to represent the buttoned leather seat cushions has been a little too heavy handed.


I disagree. I think we have to exaggerate a bit, use bright colours etc, in order to overcome the black hole effect of these tiny cockpits. That sofa looks just right to me. 😃

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Really nice progress and the cockpit looks great. I’m equally impressed how such a humble kit has you delving back into history books to understand and capture the mood and spirit of the times… who said modelling is not educational? 
 

Cheers.. Dave 

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On 27/01/2024 at 05:01, Rabbit Leader said:

who said modelling is not educational?


Now you've set me thinking.

 

When I was younger my much loved Grandparents used my Uncle's old toys (stashed in the attic) to keep me entertained. There were various treasures, old Triang trains, Airfix railway kits (he'd taken his other Airfix kits!) but the one that sticks in my mind wasn't quite a kit but a working Morse set that you had to assemble (I suspect my grandfather was trying to guide me towards engineering as a career). I've just been doing some quick internet poking and it appears that this came from the Tri-ang Lionel Famous Inventors and Science Sets which appeared in the UK in 1963 after a deal between Lionel in the US and Lines Bros.

I've just been checking out Scalemates and it seems to suggest that the first in the Trail Blazers series of kits were released in 1964; I'd guess that the Trail Blazers series are intended to be more educational than the 'NEOWWWMMMM, TACCCA TACCCA TACCCA' Spitfires, Messerschmitts etc.?

 

If I recall Triang and FROG were both part of the Line Bros empire and so maybe with the above sets of releases taking place in the early sixties perhaps someone in Lines Bros was thinking some 'educational' toys would be good sellers?

Or was it just the era? Some of the old Airfix kits my Uncle must have taken with him when he moved out were from the Historical Figures series which I think were from around the same period and probably also count as vaguely educational? He built some of them with my cousin and I saw them on visits, I definitely remember one or two Knights in Armour (I think they may have been Richard the Lionheart and/or Edward the Black Prince?) and on being told it was an Airfix kit thinking that it couldn't be, as I'd not seen anything like it in my local model shop!

 

On 26/01/2024 at 22:47, Bertie McBoatface said:

That sofa looks just right to me.


Cheers Bertie, across the Atlantic by Chesterfield it is!

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  • 4 weeks later...

I’ve been doing one of my favourite things; scouring archives.

In this case I’ve been poking Library and Archives Canada (https://library-archives.canada.ca/eng) that has a rather nice selection of photos of the Atlantic Vimy in Newfoundland. 


The Vimy was pretty much assembled in a field with basic tools and a crowd of interested bystanders. Small children seem to appear frequently; people just lie around on the grass near the aircraft, looking for all the world like they’re having a picnic; at times people crowd round the aircraft inquisitively; Lynch notes that a favoured pastime of visitors was poking the fabric of the aircraft with their umbrellas, probably much to the consternation of the crew…

It appears that anyone could pop along, and, if they had a camera handy, take a picture. So there are some posed photos but also some evidently taken when those working on the Vimy were occupied.


The Vimy as assembled in Newfoundland had some differences to the Vimy as built at Weybridge and as it is currently preserved in the Science Museum. It looks like when the Vimy was reconstructed by Vickers after the transatlantic flight before being donated to the Science Museum it was reconstructed more in line with a ‘normal’ Vimy. So I’m relying on the photos from Newfoundland to give me an idea of what it looked like at the time of the actual flight.This has revealed a number of interesting things.


1. The Vimy in the Science Museum is clean! Probably as a result of being assembled in the open in a muddy field  with visitors poking it, the Vimy as it flew ended up being rather grubby. I’ll have to bear this in mind for weathering. 

 

2. The engine nacelles are different. Looks like on the Vimy at the Science Museum and G-EAOU some extra side panels covering the exhausts have been added to the nacelles. The kit doesn’t have these extra panels but I’d been wondering if I’d have to add them. Based on photos of the Vimy in Newfoundland and Ireland these extra panels weren’t there at the time of the flight. Bit of a relief not to have to scratch them…

 

3. The Vimy as it flew had a turbine to provide electricity to their radio and Alcock and Brown’s heated flight suits. Lynch refers to this as failing in flight (leaving Alcock and Brown without radio and heated flightsuits running only off a battery) because someone failed to secure a grub screw so the rotor fell off. This isn’t on the Vimy in the Science Museum or included in the kit so I’ll have to scratch up a generator turbine to pop on the starboard fuselage by the cockpit.

 

4. The kit, the Vimy in the Science museum and G-EAOU as preserved have small turbines (these are marked as fuel pumps in Atlantic Wings 1919-1939 by Kenneth McDonough) on the forward inner nacelle struts on both port and starboard sides. A photo of the Atlantic Vimy being assembled in Newfoundland shows these on both sides.
 

https://www.scienceandindustrymuseum.org.uk/sites/default/files/styles/smg_carousel_zoom/public/2019-06/Vickers Vimy Being Assembled.jpeg


And while there are plenty of photos of the assembled Vimy in Newfoundland, there are usually people standing in just the wrong place. Here’s one, although it does nicely show the turbine for the generator. 

 

http://central.bac-lac.gc.ca/.redirect?app=fonandcol&id=3194169&lang=eng

 

But the below image shows no turbine on the starboard nacelle strut but a possible turbine on the starboard undercarriage.


http://central.bac-lac.gc.ca/.redirect?app=fonandcol&id=3598274&lang=eng

 

Clear image, from behind here, very evident that there’s no turbine on the starboard strut.

 

http://central.bac-lac.gc.ca/.redirect?app=fonandcol&id=3212816&lang=eng

 

This one doesn’t clearly show the strut but you can see the turbine peeping out from below the wing. 

 

http://central.bac-lac.gc.ca/.redirect?app=fonandcol&id=3598262&lang=eng

 

So I’m fairly certain that ‘ll have to chop the starboard turbine off and move it to the undercarriage.

 

I previously mentioned the nosewheel. I went to Scalemates to check out the original instructions to see if it noted anything on colours. I spotted a note on the instructions “Our model is of the Vimy as constructed by the manufacturer but Parts 39, 40, 41 and 44 were not fitted to the aircraft for the Transatlantic flight.” So FROG did know the Nosewheel wasn’t there but left that note off their later instructions.

In terms of modelling there has been progress but it’s not the photogenic kind, rather the dull mundanity of sanding and scraping the corrugations off the wing surfaces and drilling out holes in preparation for later rigging. Lots of holes to do, oh, so many. It’s well over 100 now, I’m not sure I want to count! Just to illustrate here's the centre section of the upper Wing, complete with 26 holes.

 

PXL_20240226_203034490~2.jpg


I’m coming to the conclusion that the rigging on the Vimy was designed by a Spider who was drinking pals with M.C. Escher. Some of it runs within the nacelles, or into the fuselage at all manner of awkward angles that have been fun to drill. That’s without thinking about the control lines...

I mentioned above a children’s Encyclopedia I had with a picture showing Brown climbing onto the wing of the Vimy to knock ice off (Lynch is clear that this never actually happened and is an invention from the 1950s misinterpreting Brown having to lean from the cockpit (but not leaving it) to clear ice off some instruments…). I found the book and the illustration! I’m thinking the illustrator must have drawn their picture from a FROG Vimy model rather than anything else, it’s got the nosewheel, absence of the generator, pretty much a perfect match for an OOB build! It’s also Khaki… 


However, it also has the clearest illustration of the rigging I’ve yet found; somehow this rigging matches all the other diagrams but it’s the easiest to follow, possibly because it’s a three quarter view. So, new source to support the build, The Junior Reference Library - Transportation, recommended for children aged 8 to 12…

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I must have been wearing the wrong glasses or something when I looked at the Windsock book. I have now noticed a photo of the machine which the caption says was taken outside the Brooklands factory, with a nosewheel "to stop it nosing over", and then one of it reassembled in Newfoundland wih no wheel. Your last source sounds as if it is a bit like the ancient volumes of the "Arthur Mee Childrens Encyclopaedia" my parents picked up for me second hand in the 1950's which featured amongst many subjects the new-fangled "Kinema"😄.

 

Pete

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More references for the Vimy:

1.Aeromodeller June 1959-George Cox drawings to 1:72

2.Aeroplane Monthly Nov&dec 1992-Mainly military Vimy`s.

3."The Vickers Vimy" by P.St John Turner

    Published by  Patrick Stephens

    SBN 85059 039 6

 

HTH

Derek S

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What I like about this forum is the readiness with which the members share their knowledge, information and references for the benefit of us all; thanks Pete and Derek.

 

What my wallet does not like about this is the number of tools, paints, kits, and especially BOOKS that this then causes me to purchase...

This may apply to The Vickers Vimy by P.St.John Turner; fortunately for my fiscal wellbeing it doesn't also apply to Arthur Mee's Children's Encyclopaedia (as much as I wish to learn more about this magical sounding "Kinema" business!)

That said; it was, according to Wikipedia (ever reliable source), the cause of rioting in Kashmir in 1973 which resulted in "four dead and over a hundred wounded" which isn't something you'd expect a Children's Encylopaedia to manage...

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