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PZL P-37A Los (IBG Models 1/72) - FINISHED


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I want to make a model of this Polish bomber this time. This aircraft is rarely seen in galleries and exhibitions.

I have a very good set from IBG.

It has photo etching and a great decal.

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I will build an airplane with the number 4. There is no photo of it, but there are other photos of PLZ-37A from 211 squadron Polish Air Force.

Samoloty-PZL-37-o-wraz-z-za-ogami-1939.j

 

Regards. Alex.

Edited by AC87
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Welcome, Alex :) Nice to see another unusual subject, this GB’s really been bringing them out in force :D

 

James

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At the moment, I have glued the interior details and installed the photo etching that was included in the kit. Perhaps after painting I will add something to the interior.

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I also made the details of the chassis niches from photo etching

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9 hours ago, JOCKNEY said:

Excellent choice Alex

We don't see enough Polish aircraft being built so I'm delighted you are building this one.

Good luck :like:

Cheers Pat 

Thanks! 

The polish planes were not very good, but this does not mean that they should not be made 😄

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28 minutes ago, AC87 said:

The polish planes were not very good, but this does not mean that they should not be made 😄

Yes, Polish fighters were already antique in 1939, but you can't fault Łoś - the world first production aircraft with a laminar wing profile. Empty weight equal to 48% of the MTOW, size and speed somewhere between Blenheim and Beaufort, but bomb load of 2,500 kg (more than Wellington) with a range of 950 miles. Or 1,700 kg with 800 miles combat radius. Show me a better bomber in service in 1938.

We all know Stalin's quote: quantity itself is the highest quality. From this point of view, the quality of Polish planes was indeed poor - only 120 Łoś bombers were built...

Cheers

Michael

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Laminar flow?  Not really - if it had the thickest point of the profile at 40-45% then it would indeed have been ahead of most - I think that the Arado 240 was the next, followed by the P-51 - but this is really PR spiel not the true case.  I'm surprised that, in any case, Cynk's epic Polish Aircraft 1893-1939 for Putnam makes no mention of anything special about the aerofoil.

 

A better comparison would be the Hampden, slightly earlier in timescale, some 20% larger and heavier empty but only slightly higher maximum weights - though I would like to see a better comparison of weights.  The Los is only some 20mph faster, despite its apparently more aerodynamic shape, and the two have effectively identical ceilings.   The Hampden at 4000lb payload is quoted at some 300 miles less than the Los - though I don't see where a Hampden can carry 4000lb (3000lb, sure).  However, I don't see how the Los can carry its maximum payload and its fuel load - both appear to need the wing inboard of the engines.  The ability to carry bombs one above the other internally does help in a direct comparison.  The cost of this is the inability to replace/help the pilot in the case of injury, as did occur in the Hampden's history.  The two make a very interesting design comparison.

 

Stalin's quote is usually rendered in English as "Quantity has a quality of its own", but what he actually said in Russian I've no idea.  Perhaps there are two different quotes.  Surely the one you give was proven wrong in mid-1941. where the Soviet Army and Air Force suffered crushing defeats despite much higher numbers.

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3 hours ago, Graham Boak said:

Laminar flow?  Not really - if it had the thickest point of the profile at 40-45% then it would indeed have been ahead of most - I think that the Arado 240 was the next, followed by the P-51 - but this is really PR spiel not the true case.  I'm surprised that, in any case, Cynk's epic Polish Aircraft 1893-1939 for Putnam makes no mention of anything special about the aerofoil.

However, I don't see how the Los can carry its maximum payload and its fuel load - both appear to need the wing inboard of the engines.  The ability to carry bombs one above the other internally does help in a direct comparison. 

Dear @Graham Boak, unlike you, I am not an aerodynamicist, but an architect. But the drawing I am attaching comes from Cynk's book. The IAW-743 profile has a maximum thickness at 40% of the chord, which has been reported by all sources for over 70 years.  https://pwm.org.pl/viewtopic.php?f=14&p=1000435

However, the fuel tanks in the PZL-37 were not placed between the fuselage and the engines - only the bomb bays were there. Integral fuel tanks were located in the caissons of the wing outer parts, i.e. outside the engines.

 

4 hours ago, Graham Boak said:

Stalin's quote is usually rendered in English as "Quantity has a quality of its own", but what he actually said in Russian I've no idea.  Perhaps there are two different quotes.  Surely the one you give was proven wrong in mid-1941, where the Soviet Army and Air Force suffered crushing defeats despite much higher numbers.

Stalin went down in history with many more or less accurate sayings. When, in the summer of 1944, the Prime Minister of the Polish government in exile, Mikołajczyk, learned during a visit to Moscow about the project agreed in Tehran to shift Poland's borders by approx. 150 miles to the west, he asked Stalin "why are you taking Lviv from us - after all, Lviv was never Russian." Stalin replied: "OK - Lviv wasn't Russian, but Warsaw was. Do you want to switch?" Well - the Soviet sense of humor...

Cheers

Michael

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Thanks for the drawing, it is not in the Putnam's book I was using. 

 

However he also writes that "All bombs were hung in a series of double tiers across the wing centre-section and fuselage from one engine nacelle to the other".  His phrase about the fuels tanks is "in the wing centre section and the fuselage".  To be consistent with what you say, it could be referring to the optional overload tanks which could be carried as an alternative to some of the bombs, but he says nothing about carriage outside the engine nacelles.  perhaps something was lost in translation.

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18 hours ago, Graham Boak said:

His phrase about the fuels tanks is "in the wing centre section and the fuselage".  To be consistent with what you say, it could be referring to the optional overload tanks which could be carried as an alternative to some of the bombs, but he says nothing about carriage outside the engine nacelles.  Perhaps something was lost in translation.

It is exactly as you write. A quite decent cutaway drawing of the PZL-37 (almost 200 numbered details) you can find in the October 1968 Air International on pages 194-195.

As standard, the Łoś had 5 fuel tanks: one in the fuselage under the cockpit, in front of the bomb bay, two in the outer wing caissons and two in the upper part of the engine nacelles. The maximum bomb load (3010 kg) included: 4x300 kg in the fuselage, 16x110 kg in the central part of the wing and 4x12.5 kg (flares) under the wings. If the 300 kg bombs were abandoned, an additional sixth fuel tank (900 l, roughly 200 Imp gal.) was installed in the fuselage bomb bay. The action radius with the maximum (3,010 kg) bomb load was 435 miles, and with a 1,810 kg bomb load and a tank in the bomb bay - 810 miles. It was not possible to install any fuel tanks in the bomb bays between the fuselage and the engines.

I hope this helps.

Cheers

Michael

 

Edited by KRK4m
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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I'm about to assemble the plane. I can't say that all the details fit together easily. It was especially difficult to install the bomb cover.

Alex.

 

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It might not have been easy to get it all together, but you wouldn't know from how good it's looking now

 

James

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I primed the model.

Also made destroyed panel joint lines when processing parts, and rivets.

Alex.

 

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Edited by AC87
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The model is painted in basic colors. So that the surface does not seem the sames, I performed slightly lightening areas.

Alex.

 

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You've done well with the paint, Alex, I really like the finish variations on the top surfaces

 

James

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Many thanks!

Individual elements have been completed. These are motors, propellers, wheels and udercarriage covers. Machine guns and a front canopy are also made.

Alex.

 

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