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U.S.S. Ward DD-139 (1/350 by Black Cat)


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That's all the guns mounted.

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Now for the last major deck fitting, the port and starboard mountings for the two boats.

Lots of supports to cut away.

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Once painted I can add the davits, in the holes on the sides, then I'll paint and add the boats, THEN I can mount the entire subassembly on the deck.

Jon

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She's looking very good! I normally use Mr.Color, but I may need to get some Colourcoat enamel when I do to a Western Approaches scheme.

 

24 minutes ago, Faraway said:

Now for the last major deck fitting, the port and starboard mountings for the two boats.

Lots of supports to cut away

Lots of support! How did you cut them away and trim the attach points?

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15 hours ago, dnl42 said:

She's looking very good! I normally use Mr.Color, but I may need to get some Colourcoat enamel when I do to a Western Approaches scheme.

 

Lots of support! How did you cut them away and trim the attach points?

Many many supports.

VERY careful scalpel use and flat bladed nippers AND prayers to the gods.

It’s amazing how only having one of each part concentrate’s the mind.

Jon

 

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This is turning out very fine indeed Jon. Lots of useful tips that I aim to steal (but will certainly forget in the next 5 minutes). Adding some rigging early and before sticking all the delicate bits outside where it's supposed to go, though... possibly a little too deviant for my tastes, I can't imagine it will catch on.

 

On 09/03/2024 at 15:30, Faraway said:

Luckily, I don't have a carpet but a wooden floor, (not that it stops the 'carpet' monster working its magic at times, you'd be amazed :yikes:how far tiny parts can bounce) and when I'd climbed down from the ceiling, I cast my eyes down and low, what do I see ?

Yes, this very mounting, sitting quite calmly by my left foot.

I just knew making those sacrifices to The Great God of Modelling : The Great and Worshipful Sprue were worth it.

So, in light of this miracle, I'm off to sit in a dark and peaceful room, doing any further work here, I think, is pushing my luck.

 

I'm also always amazed how well the carpet monster thrives without an actual carpet. In light of your miraculous discovery, would you mind if I write you a list of missing bits to check for on your floor please?

Andy

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Railings on.

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The masts will be next and then the rigging.

I've not forgotten the propellers and very last, because they are so very delicate, I'll be adding the propeller guards (I think that is what they called)

Part #69 below

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32 minutes ago, Silenoz said:

Splendid work with the painting and detailing. Do you take special preparations to glue that outer railing?

Thanks.

I paint the railings before fitting and then of course have to touch up the paint, where it flakes off and where the railings are attached to the ‘sprue’.

Also, I try to shape them to the curves where they will go, just pull them gently between finger and thumb usually works for deck railings, as the deck curvature is never to acute.

Those that go onto platforms and deckhouse roofs, usually require bending around something.

Jon

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On 3/10/2024 at 12:16 PM, Faraway said:

Forward guns fitted, I believe the little one is a quick firer.

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Exceptional work!

Just as an FYI, the little one -- which the old Revell 1/240 instructions always called a 'practice gun' -- was in fact the USN's first purpose-built anti-aircraft gun, the Mark 14 3"/23 Poole gun. It was a UK-engineered mod of the older 3" gun designed for submarines and small patrol boats.

(Just a bit of the mind-clogging trivia I so rarely get to share.... :D)

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Jon - that is really looking superb :clap2:

What are your plans for the portholes?

I've taken to "Felt-penning" mine with a "Pigma Micron 005" black marker (similar to Uniball Posaca)

And kudos for releasing that boat support from it's lugs - not the easiest........

Rob

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2 hours ago, robgizlu said:

What are your plans for the portholes?

No plans…….at the moment.

Please to be explaining what you are doing.
Jon

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14 minutes ago, Faraway said:

No plans…….at the moment.

Please to be explaining what you are doing.
Jon

Your porthole inners are pale instead of dark - I paint the inners of my scuttles/portholes dark (black) to represent a dark interior then fill with Krystal Klear

Rob

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4 hours ago, thorfinn said:

Exceptional work!

Just as an FYI, the little one -- which the old Revell 1/240 instructions always called a 'practice gun' -- was in fact the USN's first purpose-built anti-aircraft gun, the Mark 14 3"/23 Poole gun. It was a UK-engineered mod of the older 3" gun designed for submarines and small patrol boats.

(Just a bit of the mind-clogging trivia I so rarely get to share.... :D)

You would hope that the AA gun had some kind of limiter to avoid firing on the A gun crew in the heat of action!

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7 hours ago, Faraway said:

 

I'll be adding the propeller guards (I think that is what they called)

Jon, that is exactly what they are called. Not to highjack your thread, but a quick sea story about those guards. . . In a former life I was Operations Officer on a Knox Class frigate in the Western Pacific. We would do naval gunfire support exercises off Tabones in the Philippines. While on the gunline, firing our 5 inch 54 at targets ashore, we would be joined by enterprising young Filipinos in their banca boats. They would grab onto our prop guards for a free ride while collecting the spent powder casings floating down the side after being jettisoned by the gunners mates up forward. Those metal shells would be turned into beautifully tooled ashtrays for sale on Magsaysay Street in Olongapo. I still have one somewhere. 
 

Best,

 

Jeff

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1 hour ago, neilh said:

You would hope that the AA gun had some kind of limiter to avoid firing on the A gun crew in the heat of action!

Can't disagree, but I think it's pretty plain from the gun's odd location that a/c weren't seen as much of a threat at the time. When the Wickes and Caldwell DDs began to be refitted in the '30s and '40s, most of the Mk 14s were replaced with more powerful (and much better situated) AA guns better suited to the threat.😁

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7 hours ago, robgizlu said:

Your porthole inners are pale instead of dark - I paint the inners of my scuttles/portholes dark (black) to represent a dark interior then fill with Krystal Klear

Rob

 

It's time consuming, but you could spot the portholes chrome silver, then apply Tamiya clear blue (or green) for an easy but effective glass effect. All dependant on scale and fine-tipped brush to hand of course. And please, please, please try it out on something expendable first rather than ruining a latest pride and joy project.

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8 hours ago, robgizlu said:

Your porthole inners are pale instead of dark - I paint the inners of my scuttles/portholes dark (black) to represent a dark interior then fill with Krystal Klear

Rob

I thought so, I’ll see what I can do.

Jon

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7 hours ago, thorfinn said:

Can't disagree, but I think it's pretty plain from the gun's odd location that a/c weren't seen as much of a threat at the time. When the Wickes and Caldwell DDs began to be refitted in the '30s and '40s, most of the Mk 14s were replaced with more powerful (and much better situated) AA guns better suited to the threat.😁

It is an odd place to put a gun, not much of an arc of fire.

Jon

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1 hour ago, Andy H said:

 

It's time consuming, but you could spot the portholes chrome silver, then apply Tamiya clear blue (or green) for an easy but effective glass effect. All dependant on scale and fine-tipped brush to hand of course. And please, please, please try it out on something expendable first rather than ruining a latest pride and joy project.

I’ll try else where, but I’m not sure I want to do this.

Could be one of those jobs, that only I know is there.

Jon

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8 hours ago, Jeff.M said:

Jon, that is exactly what they are called. Not to highjack your thread, but a quick sea story about those guards. . . In a former life I was Operations Officer on a Knox Class frigate in the Western Pacific. We would do naval gunfire support exercises off Tabones in the Philippines. While on the gunline, firing our 5 inch 54 at targets ashore, we would be joined by enterprising young Filipinos in their banca boats. They would grab onto our prop guards for a free ride while collecting the spent powder casings floating down the side after being jettisoned by the gunners mates up forward. Those metal shells would be turned into beautifully tooled ashtrays for sale on Magsaysay Street in Olongapo. I still have one somewhere. 
 

Best,

 

Jeff

Interesting.
I’m surprised that empties were discarded.

Couldn’t they be reloaded ?

I used to reload shotgun cartridges, but then they are a bit smaller.

Jon

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My Cheat for port holes is using an HB pencil it gives a dark sheen when you swirl the point in the hole.  :idea:

 

Coming along very good Jon

 

beefy

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3 minutes ago, beefy66 said:

My Cheat for port holes is using an HB pencil it gives a dark sheen when you swirl the point in the hole.  :idea:

 

Coming along very good Jon

 

beefy

I like the sound of that.

Using one of those, click out the lead, pencils is less hazardous than trying to get paint etc in such a tiny hole.

Jon

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Not to hijack the build thread but Bobs Buckles were mentioned, and not to take anything away from his fine products,  I thought I had some 1/48th and 1/72nd ones left over from aircraft builds but either have used them all or lost them so as advised by @thorfinn I made a few up myself in 10 minutes or so this morning.

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I used wire from an old shielded computer cable, but the inside of any cat 5/network cable is probably the same, chucked a piece of beading wire that I uses to apply superglue in a pin vise and used tweezers to hold the looped wire.  I think it would be even easier with a pin vise with an archimedes screw or longer shank.

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