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Questions about Capital Ships of the 1930’s.


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        Hello everyone, Im thinking of building a ship in the “Golden age of Transport” group build. I normally build wingy things but feel like doing a ship for this era. Im looking for answers to which 1:700 kits most likely. Though the old revell 1:426 Arizona may be a possibility as it’s cheap and can be found relatively easily. I want to build either the USS Texas, USS Arizona, or HMS Hood, Iron Duke, or Royal Oak in 1932.


So question #1 would be what are the best kits ?

 

Question #2 best paint colors for these ships?  

 

I know there is some contention to Arizona’s colors in 1941 but will not be worried about this as this is long after I wish to model. I will build a 2nd Arizona someday in 1941 colors to reflect her last days. Thank you in advance and I will leave a link in case anyone is curious. 
 

 

Dennis

 

 

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle
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I can't really help with the paints, but I can for kit recommendations.

 

For the Texas, there's the Trumpeter kit, but it's her late war fit festooned with AA guns, so backdating it would be a substantial undertaking. You'd probably need to replace the main deck completely rather than try to remove all the gun tubs.

 

Arizona has the Dragon kit, but it hasn't been released for while and might be hard to find. IIRC, there's a HobbyBoss kit as well but it's on the basic side.

 

Flyhawk have done the Iron Duke in her WW1 fit, but it's "arm and a leg expensive".

 

Trumpeter have done a 1931 boxing of the Hood with an aircraft catapult on the quarterdeck, shouldn't be too difficult to get, I would think.

 

Finally, the Royal Oak has only been done in resin, by WSW and Orange Hobby. Both are in her as-lost in 1939 condition, so would also need backdating.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Mike.:)

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6 hours ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

I want to build either the USS Texas, USS Arizona, or HMS Hood, Iron Duke, or Royal Oak in 1932.

Gidday, I can only advise on the Airfix kits I'm afraid and as they're no longer in production (AFAIK) I don't know what my advice is worth.

 

The Airfix HMS Hood OOB depicts her as at about 1932 as far as I can determine but I found the shaft struts a bit out. No problem if you decide to waterline the kit.

Their HMS Iron Duke kit is a bit of a hodge-podge of eras. It has the coffee-pot searchlight towers on the second funnel and the heavy spotting top above the tripod so this suggests sometime after 1917 I think. It also has the 6-inch casemate guns under 'Y' turret which were removed very early in her life due to them being unworkable in any sort of sea - too close to the waterline. They can be omitted and plated over, I did that.

 

This is a bit academic though, unless you can pick up the kits second hand.       Regards, Jeff.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Is your subject matter fixed? Other than the kit of Hood, there are no kits of the others that wouldn't need fairly significant chopping about to represent them in their inter-war appearance.

 

There are relatively few inter-war subjects made by the mainstream manufacturers. For obvious reasons, they tend to focus on warships fits during WWI, or WWII. 

 

There are some good interwar kits out there though. HMS Hermes by Flyhawk is one that I have experenience of building- and is an excellent, if expensive, kit. Trumpeter's USS Saratoga is also available in a 1930s fit, and is a good kit (if getting quite old now). An aircraft carrier might be an interesting choice for a 1930s themed group build as this was the decade when the technology really matured.

 

Just a thought!

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1 hour ago, Killingholme said:

Is your subject matter fixed?

Thank you for responding to my post. No I think I will be going with HMS Hood in the 1931 boxing. Its the most logical choice as well as in my budget. 

 

1 hour ago, Killingholme said:

There are relatively few inter-war subjects made by the mainstream manufacturers. For obvious reasons, they tend to focus on warships fits during WWI, or WWII. 

Yes that makes sense, sad though as Im sure others would like to do interwar subjects. 

 

1 hour ago, Killingholme said:

There are some good interwar kits out there though. HMS Hermes by Flyhawk is one that I have experenience of building- and is an excellent, if expensive, kit. Trumpeter's USS Saratoga is also available in a 1930s fit, and is a good kit (if getting quite old now). An aircraft carrier might be an interesting choice for a 1930s themed group build as this was the decade when the technology really matured.

If I could afford the carrier it would be my primary choice as an aviation person. Sadly most flattops are way out of my $ range. They would take almost 2 years of my budget to purchase let alone all the A/Market bits & bobs I would want. 

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To be honest, I'd have chosen HMS Hood too! Despite the fact she was entering 'middle age' in the 1930s, Hood was still the absolute embodyment of British international naval supremacy. She arguably played a much more significant role during the time she spent in the '20s and '30s cirumnavigating the globe to "show the flag" than she did during her tragically short wartime career.

 

As to paint colours- if you're modelling her in 1931 as claimed by the kit (if I remember rightly Trumpeter introduced a few anachronisms for a 100% accurate 1931 fit which you may want to look up), then Hood would be wearing 507B Home Fleet Admiralty Grey, with black boot topping, dark grey anti-fouling beneath the waterline, and many areas of deck that were not exposed teak being covered with corticene (a red-brown tinted linoneum product). Sovereign Hobbies offers this precise shade of grey in their range- and they do have US distributors https://www.sovereignhobbies.co.uk/. If you cannot source it, or don't want to use enamel paint, there's more useful info on paint options here. http://www.hmshood.org.uk/hoodtoday/models/tips/hoodpaint.htm

 

(By the way, Royal Navy paint colours is a can of worms you might wish to avoid opening. It's a huge topic!) 

 

Will

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  • 3 weeks later...

Bit of an update I did purchase the 1:700 Trumpeter HMS Hood. @Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies would you know if these colors depicted in the instructions are accurate for 1931 ? 
 

https://i.imgur.com/R3r0qiT.jpg

 

If not what are you're best suggestions for paint colors ? The two distributors your site has listed. Maine doesnt have the colors. Or the California store want’s £10.00 ? But a bit out of range for my budget. So I will need to color match to my rack and or buy Tamiya or Mr.Color (Gunze) lacquers. 
 

Dennis

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5 hours ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

Bit of an update I did purchase the 1:700 Trumpeter HMS Hood. @Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies would you know if these colors depicted in the instructions are accurate for 1931 ? 
 

https://i.imgur.com/R3r0qiT.jpg

 

If not what are you're best suggestions for paint colors ? The two distributors your site has listed. Maine doesnt have the colors. Or the California store want’s £10.00 ? But a bit out of range for my budget. So I will need to color match to my rack and or buy Tamiya or Mr.Color (Gunze) lacquers. 
 

Dennis

 

Hi Dennis, the drawing there is no good I'm afraid. In 1931 she would have been wearing the then-current Admiralty Pattern 507B which went through 3 different appearances. This version was after some blue pigment was added to the formula at the end of the 1920s but it was changed again in 1936 adding more to give the version most people will be familiar with. I add this context to save you from deciding to go shopping for 507B - save your time and money there! Whilst not perfect, FS26099 with a satin finish will look ok for this intermediate appearance. Rather than grey as shown on the illustration above, most of the boat deck which was not planked in wood was covered with Corticene, a brown coloured mat product shamelessly stolen from the man who invented Linoleum but couldn't afford to patent it. The boot topping at the waterline was indeed black, but below the waterline the anti-fouling paint was dark grey. This looks to have been a touch darker than the 507B above the waterline based upon contemporary photographs of the ship in drydock, and suspected to have been fairly neutral in hue but this estimation of hue is based on contemporary models.

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