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Messeschmitt Bf. 109F-4 - Egypt 1942 - FINISHED!


RainierHooker

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I'm well into decal mode. So far ive used components of four separate decal sheets to come up with the insignia for this little guy: the Eduard kit's crosses, a Hasegawa Bf 109G-6 for the III Gruppe squiggles, a Printscale JG52 sheet for the numbers, a Techmod generic sheet for the atypical borderless-swastikas, and soon I'll be adding two more into the mix for stencils and the III./JG27 logo on the engine cowl...

 

53361107453_1e3017e776_h.jpg0-12 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

53360896281_dbe7880339_h.jpg0-13 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

I stand by my yellow insignia punt...

 

53360012582_179adf12d6_h.jpg0-14 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Yes, I realize that grey-scaling on a computer does not definitively account for the weird things that certain kinds of photography does to certain kinds of colors, but I fink its convincing enough. Once I fade the insignia with pigments, the contrast between the yellow of the insignia and the white of the crosses will be even less.

 

53355723735_b4c5302fbb_k.jpg7IIIJG27-1 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

I'll have a few adjustments to do on the decals and painted on insignia before Im done, but that'll have to wait until I get all the rest on, the Microsol has done it magic, and a coat of clear go on. For lack of any better idea, the "Jabo" stencil under the cockpit will be drawn on with a white pencil.

Edited by RainierHooker
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That's looking very nice now. I think your thought process with the yellow numbers is entirely plausible, and given the lack of definitive proof, no one can prove you wrong ;)

 

James

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After a short work day I came home and whittled out the base for the diorama out of that chunk of mahogany from my scrap bin. It fits the poly carbonate box/hood/cover/thingy rather well for only about 15 minutes of work:

 

53361972787_486a1e75c5_h.jpg0-23 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Its just about the perfect size for a Friedrich, a Kubel, and some desert airfield detritus:

 

53363176599_df90b3a54f_h.jpg0-24 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Also on my way home I stopped into my local hobby shop where they were having an anniversary sale. I was mostly successful in only gathering up some thinner and other small supplies that I needed and not adding to the stash. Sort of. There was a Plastic Soldier brand kit that includes the parts to build three German trucks, either as an Opel Blitz or a Mercedes Benz L3000. I brought the wee trucks home and quickly mocked one together. As it turns out, I stand by my decision to use just a Kubelwagen in this vignette. The wee trucks aren't wee at all, one would dominate the display too much I think, especially once the scenery and other details are added...

 

53361972792_e6580bb9b7_h.jpg0-25 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

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Im waiting for a decal sheet to come in the mail (should be here friday), the III./JG27 shield on the engine cowl. My available sheets only have the Stab./JG27 emblem which is similar except the little airplane silhouettes are gold/yellow on the later and black on the former. In the meantime I've turned to making and painting all the ancillary details for the vignette. Starting with the pilot...

 

53362357382_b68accd62c_h.jpg0-26 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

This little guy is from the Ammo by MIG figure set "Panzer Crew 1943" but this particular fellow is wearing a Luftwaffe Tropical flight jacket. So while it's maybe not ideal for a tanker in 1943, it is perfect for our little scene here. Figure painting is just about my least favorite thing in this hobby, I almost universally avoid it, because I almost universally botch the job. I nerded out on youtube figure painting videos for a while and finally relented and picked up the paintbrush. I'm actually delighted at the result this time around...

 

53363687735_0154a42834_h.jpg0-27 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

From now on though, in this diorama at least, I can rejoice in only having to paint machines and man made junk from here on out...

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Wow, this is looking good! Excellent work on the 109 and the figure. The figure is well detailed for 1/72 btw. Should look great when the vignette is finished.

 

Keep up the great work.

George

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Spent the evening straining y eyes and wits painting boxes, barrels, and what seemed like a million jerry cans...

 

53364771387_141605e8b0_h.jpg0-28 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

The cans came from Shapeways and are really neat for such a small 3D print. You get a bushel of them and there are several variations in "markings" on them. I painted them in four different theoretically correct colors and painted about a third of them with the white crosses denoting their use for drinking water only, essential in any desert diorama. The remainder ostensibly contain gasoline, that other desert-war essential. The pile of boxes is a resin bit from my stash of random bits, I think it came from an HO scale railroad kit, but fits the bill in size and shape here. Im anxiously awaiting my sandy scenery supplies. Alas, the local model shop doest stock much in the way of diorama makings, so I had to order my supplies online a few days ago.

 

Hopefully by the weekend I can get cracking and get to the beginning of the end. Or at least the end of the beginning...

Edited by RainierHooker
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Nothing much new to report other than I'm impatiently waiting for my scenery supplies to arrive in the mailbox and for the varnish to dry on the base...

 

53367869927_68987275f3_h.jpg0-29 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

hopefully both of those things will have occurred by the time I return from work this afternoon. Then I have the whole weekend worth of evenings to shut myself in and get back to diorama-ing.

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Okie dokie... I've started on Afrikan scenery.

 

First, I started off by finalizing the positions of all the major players in the scene, including some real rocks that looked that part:

 

53369709996_5ad308e492_h.jpg0-30 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

The rocks were then fixed to the base with hot glue:

 

53369710001_8e41878caf_h.jpg0-31 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

After watching a bunch of how-tos on YouTube, I decided to use AK's "Terrains" line of diorama base materials. They do several different consistencies and textures suiting a wide variety of locales. I'm using two similar but noticeably different types; "Desert Sand" is very light in color and texture supposedly simulating the fine light sand of dune type deserts, and "Sandy Desert" a slightly darker orangey color and with a bit more grit to simulate the more rocky fringes of a sand desert. Either way, they come out of the pot looking and feeling like slightly demented custard:

 

53369903003_17b1221358_h.jpg0-32 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

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Using a mixture of a butter knife, an old sponge, and a couple different brushes I started slathering the gritty custard, I mean "terrains", on the base. I started with the rougher and darker "Sandy Desert" around the rocks and built up into mounds along the back and right edges of the base:

 

53369903008_0babb62ce9_h.jpg0-33 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

This was followed by a thinner layer of the "Desert Sand" mostly in the middle of the base and leading a little path through the mound to the right edge. I tried to maintain troughs and ditches, via my applicators, in the directions that tracks would have been left by the aircraft and the Kubelwagen. They are a bit exaggerated now, but that's just temporary. I also plopped the pile of boxes and the fuel drums into their positions so the sand formed around their bases without gaps:

 

53369709966_39383e66ec_h.jpg0-34 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Then the most important tool came out: an opaque black beer. This was useful while I was waiting for the "terrains" to start to set up. As it was doing so and started to fir up, I came back every so often with a brush wetted with water to stipple and knock down the edges troughs and craters of the sand:

 

53370162605_9bc145584f_h.jpg0-35 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Finally, as everything further firmed up, I went through with a few sprigs pulled from some Woodland Scenics brand "Fine Leaf Foliage" which is usually used to make fine trees for model railroads:

 

53370025039_d8b9b62b54_h.jpg0-36 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

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The base is looking fantastic though I agree that the textured terrain material does look like a strange, thick custard but it looks like it is going to have the desired effect and create a realistic setting for your 109 and Kubelwagen. A good idea to add the boxes and fuel drums before it set as it has made them look like they have been there for a while and have sand built up around their bases.

A fine looking choice of tipple too, I do like dark beers, and the perfect opportunity to enjoy it while patiently waiting for the ground work to set.

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Overnight the terrains had mostly set, it's still a bit soft in the most built up areas. It definitely shrinks a bit, so I'll have a little remedial patchwork on some of the more noticeable shrinks and some cracks. The "Desert Sand" is a touch rougher than i expected, but it's supposedly sandable after fully cured, so I'll probably knock it back a bit with fine sandpaper before all is said and done. I did add some more leafy and tufty plant bits from my random assemblage of model railroad scenery supplies:

 

53370765311_6a7bc72a09_h.jpg0-41 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

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The postman delivered the final decal sheet that I needed to complete this Messerschmitt; a sheet of JG27 emblems from Peddinghaus. After applying the shields to the engine cowling, I've undertaken the task of finishing off the million or so stencils included on the Eduard decal sheet. For my sanity, I'm only doing a handful at a time, starting with the little dashed lines denoting the walkways on the wing roots...

 

53377862629_c225e61f01_h.jpg0-9 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Also, over the weekend I finished up the landing gear. I thought I had taken pictures of the construction and painting process of these little, but important bits. Alas, such photos aren't anywhere to be found in my  phone's album.

 

53377724933_0d97899462_h.jpg0-10 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Once I get the last decals on, and spray a matte clear coat, I'll put on the "Jabo" insignia on the fuselage and turn my sights back on the cockpit and glazing. Should be wrapping up this build soon.

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All decals on, matte clear applied, and onto final weathering. Since I'm modeling this Messerschmitt as it was before the incident that resulted in it being yard art at an RAF Aerodrome, I'm trying to tread the line between "used" and "nearly derelict". Starting with a thin pin wash of Tamiya Dark Brown Panel Liner:

 

53378962934_9aa721d990_h.jpg0-11 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

53378962939_5dd99eb2af_h.jpg0-12 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

 

Next will be another thin spray of matte clear followed by powders and pigments...

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Not sure about the porter, that & stout are fine for putting a gloss on the u know wot but little else to my mind, still each to their own, I'm more a Pilsner or Hazy IPA type myself, a lager lout from way back. :)  The rest of it is looking pretty darn fine. 👍

Steve.

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