Jump to content

In The Bag (New Pictures) --- Bulgarian P.24b


Recommended Posts

B2baDLr.jpeg

 

I thought I'd try and do something quick, just assemble a rough kit I got a long time ago. The major parts seemed to fit well enough, tacked together with white glue. But it seemed a better kit would be appropriate for a Greek example, and its surface detail would not support the silver lacquer finish of a Turkish machine. So I looked around for something else, found Bulgaria brought a few of these, found their national markings charming, like something out of a thirties 'secret agent' flick of Balkan derring-do. It really was a mistake, and this is what came of close enquiry....

 

i7VARSZ.jpeg

 

 

wGv8QVi.jpeg

 

 

 

SLKMI9C.jpeg

 

 

 

7sFNvst.jpeg

 

CCugNPu.jpeg

 

PO0oIyu.jpeg

 

I'd scarcely suspected a Bulgarian air force existed at the time, and it certainly saw little use during WWII. Bulgaria began to acquire modern aeroplanes in 1937, among them 14 PZL P.24B fighters (for reasons which must have seemed good to Poland's government, PZL offered for export fighters better than those purchased for the Polish air service). They did little of note flying for Bulgaria, and had been sidelines by the time the country became involved in WWII directly, assisting the invasion of Greece and Yugoslavia. The Government and Crown of Bulgaria weaved a delicate path, allied with Hitler yet not at war with Stalin, and for a time profited by it in slices of Greece and occupation duty in Serbia.

 

The kit would build well enough as a late-model P.24F, I suppose, as pictured on the header. I was fairly well into assembly before I found out about the Bulgarian sale, and so began a conversion on the fly, after the wing was attached to the fuselage (though not yet strutted), and the motor and cowling already assembled. There's a link to the WIP below. I'd have done a lot of things different had I set out to do this. Apparently these were usually flown open cockpit, and I'd have done an interior, and my own windscreen. I like to think I'd have gotten copious louvers sorted better, too. I'd certainly have had a better line on painting the flash. It's freehand, and either it's a bit too thick or I laid out the decals a bit small. Usually I would lightly scribe a demarcation, it sort of guides the paint. I don't know if various reshapings I found needed to get the nose/wing/cowling juncture close to how drawings (consulted late of course) depict the area. Things might have proved fine with the original pieces. I had a great time horsing something good enough for a shelf out of it. For a look at what a Bulgarian P.24B ought to look like, see this by Ray_W, about halfway down pg 1 of the Hi-Wing GB:

 

 Here's my WIP, for a blow by blow....

 

 

James

 

 

Edited by Old Man
  • Like 29
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, MilneBay said:

A very good job on a difficult kit. I built one of those years ago, and did it in the Turkish scheme. It was a battle.

 

The Bulgarian scheme is interesting.

 

Thanks, Milnebay.

 

It is an awful rough kit, but it is different when you know that going in. Basic fit isn't bad, the canopy fit with very, very little fettling. A lot of the problem is that it's just weird. Their interior and motor detail is mirror image and back to front, it's hard to see how it got quite so botched. The single-socket joints for struts and undercarriage are a real bother, too. I think Revell did the same on their P.11.

 

It was the cockades that got me to the Bulgarian subject. Crossed swords over a maltese cross in red with a gold crown in the center. By the time war began, they'd gone to the black 'X' on white field. Flashes like that red ornament were fairly common. USAAC and Japanese units were the chief offenders....

 

 

James

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice work and result.

The kit is a Polish product from "Spółdzielnia Wielobranżowa" (~a "multi branches cooperative" ) . As one can learn from Scalmates it was released in 1989 ( this  is exactly your "bag" kit) and then was reboxed in mid 1990s  by  RPM and WK models (another small Polish more or less ephemeridae companies) and currently it is available as MisterCraft product (https://www.scalemates.com/pl/kits/spo-dzielnia-wielobran-owa-pzl-p-24-f-g--137091 ).

I never have it since in seventies I did a scratch conversion of Revell P11 into Greek P24 and I those days I thought I do not need another P24... (currently I have in stash the IBG P24, so I have changed my mind meanwhile...)  However,  as for the standards of the time  and place it does not look very bad in box... :) 

Regards

J-W

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, stevehnz said:

Nicely done James, I enjoyed the build & am enjoying the result. 👍

Steve.

 

Thanks, Steve. I had a good time with it, and it doesn't seem to offend the eyes. I rushed a few things towards the end, but it deserved better by now than the 'shelf o' doom'....

 

 

James

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, JWM said:

Very nice work and result.

The kit is a Polish product from "Spółdzielnia Wielobranżowa" (~a "multi branches cooperative" ) . As one can learn from Scalmates it was released in 1989 ( this  is exactly your "bag" kit) and then was reboxed in mid 1990s  by  RPM and WK models (another small Polish more or less ephemeridae companies) and currently it is available as MisterCraft product (https://www.scalemates.com/pl/kits/spo-dzielnia-wielobran-owa-pzl-p-24-f-g--137091 ).

I never have it since in seventies I did a scratch conversion of Revell P11 into Greek P24 and I those days I thought I do not need another P24... (currently I have in stash the IBG P24, so I have changed my mind meanwhile...)  However,  as for the standards of the time  and place it does not look very bad in box... :) 

Regards

J-W

 

 

Thanks, J-W. That's more background than I had before, I appreciate the translation very much.

 

You have missed nothing by not taking a run at this. It could work if you resolved to scratch all detail and discarded what is supplied. The major pieces do go together well, though the struts/undercarriage mating is awful tricky, The corrugation is a bit underdone. Before sanity returned, I thought of swapping in a wing from a Heller P.11 (which I keep meaning to build as an early Rumanian example).

 

 

James

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Old Man changed the title to In The Bag (New Pictures) --- Bulgarian P.24b

Thanks for showing what could be done with an old bag kit from way back when that is not particularly accurate, nor detailed, nor fits too well.  Through perseverance, effort and skill you have turned it into a really nice kit that is quite colorful and easy on the eyes to look at.  Thanks for sharing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...