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Land Rover series 3 half ton Lightweight - 1:35 scale


bootneck

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I should have remembered the battery thing, they're between the seats on the FFR. Also I remember the hassle when my alternator failed, trying to find the right pulley one.

 

Talking of memories, I lent my Lightweight to a friend, he took it and about half an hour later phoned me and called me all sorts for leaving it with not much fuel in it, basically he  had ran out of fuel going up a steep hill, causing chaos behind him.  After turning up with a can of fuel to get him moving again, I looked at the tank beneath the seat and noticed that he had somehow knocked the fuel change over lever across and cut off the fuel supply!  Can't remember if it was moved to the middle position or to the left hand tank which I rarely filled.

 

 

Cracking work there agin Mike, and well done Pete for all this attention to detail!

 

 

Edited by 71chally
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1 hour ago, PeteH1969 said:

........ there are two versions of 24v vehicles one with a single belt driven alternator and a twin belt high Amp alternator

I would think that our, Royal Marines, FFR's had the high amp alternator; mainly as we spent much of our time away from any resupply elements, we had to keep our engines running while static in order to keep the radio cage batteries charged.  Although we carried a portable generator, it wasn't tactically feasable to set it up.   The MTO used to go ballistic when we got back to base because our vehicle log sheets showed we were doing about 1 mile per gallon!  :elephant:

 

Mike

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I'm loving this Mike

 

That pale-y looking eau de nil with added oil and road gribble brings back memories of losing the fan into the rad on the upper reaches of the M6 one dark and stormy night.

 

If I lay my hands on one of these I will make it into 24FM12 of which I was a frequent user.

 

Somebody like to explain how I remember that from '78 perlease, when I have trouble remembering why I went upstairs most days?

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7 hours ago, perdu said:

Somebody like to explain how I remember that from '78 perlease, when I have trouble remembering why I went upstairs most days?

Probably the same way that I remember 24BR20 from 1964, yet I've forgotten what I had for breakfast.........or even if I had breakfast!

 

John.

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I know what you are saying,  This morning, I couldn't remember if I had turned the light off in the shed [it's blacked out for 3D printing], so I had to go back down the garden to check;  but I can remember all my car registration numbers, right back to the first one [NNH386H] in 1970.

 

cheers,

Mike

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Hello All,

 

I had a little confusion with the parts, between the original 12v GS and the new 24v FFR parts; so, I decided to print out the original GS kit parts again.   Then, I thought that this would be an opportune time to show you what comprises the full kit.

 

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There are around 50 parts, some are very tiny; such as the shackle bolt and pin.  I shall (re)start the GS over the weekend.

 

cheers,

Mike

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Hi Mike, just found your build, interesting. I'm a fan of the lightweight and might need to investigate getting one somehow. The printed parts look very good, think I'd rather have it in 1/24th scale!

I was at Sembewang the same time you were out there, I was on 847 NAS for a short while.

 

Colin the Wessex grubber.

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Hi Colin,

 

847 NAS was absorbed into 848 NAS when disembarked to Sembawang.  Where you still there then?  Did you come back to UK with us on Albion?

 

847 NAS and 848 NAS MAOT teams at swimming pool, HMS Simbang, Sembawang.  I'm on the left of this photo.

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The camp and airfield are still there but much larger now.  I think the cinema has been demolished and perhaps also the swimming pool.

 

cheers,

Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...

As I mentioned earlier, I had messed up my build; in that I tried to make a 24v FFR with the 12v GS kit.  I hadn't realised that there were so many differences between the two types. 

 

This was my FFR build with the GS type of engine compartment layout.  Differences in the body and electrics would have been more obvious.

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I shall now make a restart, basing my build on the actual kit parts as produced by PDH-Designs.   Fortunately, especially for me, Pete has started making the amendments and updates for a 24v FFR version, with thanks to some very helpful support from @simmerit. :thumbsup:

 

I was asked, offine, by someone as to why I printed the parts horizontally, as the common method seems to be angled.  My answer is time and money.  Printing using liquid resin takes time, measured on the height of the model to print; therefore, the higher the model the longer it takes and that uses more electricity etc.  If this chassis component was to be printed at an angle of about 45deg, it could take about four hours to print.  To keep my time and costs down, I try to print at as low a level as possible but still maintain as high a standard of clarity as possible.

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The same goes for the main body, I can get a decent print with the model being printed horizontally.  Any support stubs on the underside can be filed down quite easily on this type of resin print, any slight marks left over would be hidden by the chassis.   Support stubs are a feature of 3D printing, much like ejector stubs on an injection moulded kit.

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A nice element of this kit is the provision of a canopy/tilt frame.  I can envisage at least three settings for this:  the frame fitted as-is, without a tilt;  the frame with a tilt fitted, made from paper and glue etc., and also with the rear frame removed and just the driver compartment cover frame fitted.  Having looked at many photos, there seems to be even more scenarios for how the top canopy is fitted, or not.

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I've said this before, but I just feel that I want to say again, how good the components are when printed.  As another example, the doors are really fine with exquisite detail on the exterior

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and the interior.  Note the door handle, plus just how thin the door skin is; it is almost translucent yet quite strong.

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The kit comes with a nice set of wheels with bar type treads, although other treads could be made available, and consist of four full wheels and a spare.

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Finally, before going back to the build, this gearbox is really nice and sharp; unfortunately, my photography isn't up to the standard to show it off at its best.

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So, getting back to the build,  here is a view of the chassis with the engine, gearbox, axles and leaf-suspension fitted.  I have only primed the parts this time, planning to paint the model at a later stage.

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Slightly off topic but looking ahead, in addition to this 12v GS Lightweight and the future 24v FFR full kits, I have learned from Pete that he is planning some conversion sets, based on the Revell and Italeri Land Rover 109" LWB kits, of the following:

 

Land Rover Centaur

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Land Rover TACR1

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Land Rover Ambulance with full interior - with a choice of either a series II or a series III body.

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Any enquiries on these models should be directed to Pete on his website, using his "contact us" facility.  Let's hope that these models become very popular and that they entice Pete to produce more vehicle kits and conversions.

 

That's it for tonight and I hope to provide another update by the weekend.

 

cheers,

Mike

 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello everybody,

 

I am back on track now and have the chassis', engines, batteries and air filters for both the 12v GS and 24v FFR Lightweights.  I have printed the FFR pieces, as can be seen below beside the GS version, and will be cleaning them up and priming over this weekend.
 

The original GS version with the new parts for an FFR version on the right.

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I am really impressed with the front grill of this kit and also this series 3 grill, possibly a teaser for the future?

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I hope to show more progress soon.

 

cheers,
Mike

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Hello all,

 

after a few minor amendments, the chassis' are progressing nicely.  Just the exhausts and shock absorbers, plus the battery for the GS version to fit.  Then I can move on to the bodies.  Apologies for the less than sharp images, it was all so very much easier with the old Box Brownie.

 

I have received updated versions of the Lightweight bodies as can be seen here.  The earlier model has had worked stopped on it.

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cheers,

 

Mike

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Sad question.  How did he get on with the alternator mount on the engine on the FFR?  I only just sent the last piccies last weekend having finally got to the spare engine at the back of my garage!  I send a shed load of piccies of the engine - sadly I'd be interested in looking he's he got on with the 3D design (when printed).  Not that I'm a sad rivet counter or anything............

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Hi S,

 

yes, I seem to have two, maybe three engines now.  Each has a different alternator mount and some have different fans.  I'm just off to the shed to give them a spray of primer and then I'll post some photos.

 

cheers,
Mike

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It's cold out there tonight. :cold:

I've actually got four engines from Pete, each working up in size and alternators.   I gave these a quick spray of primer, followed by a blast from a hairdryer, then finished with a spray of aluminium.

 

I broke a couple of fan blades in my fumbling of opening the shed door in the dark! :doh:  I'll add new fans tomorrow.  Also shown in the centre is the standard gearbox.

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Whilst looking at my previous work, I noticed how dark everything looks, with just greens and blacks etc., and that makes it difficult to show off how good these parts are.  As such, I have decided to print off another set of parts, in order to make parallel build, only this time I shall give everything a light coat; starting with this freshly printed chassis.

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cheers,
Mike

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An amazingly detailed and accurate kit! I have fond (if cold) memories of driving our RAF Mountain rescue Landy to some very remote locations in Wales. Looking forward to following this build’s completion.

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27 minutes ago, Pete in Lincs said:

I seem to remember that RAF Land rovers were always cold. Even in the Summer!

You must have had the air con set too low. :whistle:

 

I passed my driving test in a short wheelbase rag top L/R back in 1977.  St Athens school of motoring. :rofl:

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I just found this thread, what a great subject.

A friend of mine had one of these in the late 1980s.

It was purchased in the UK and came to Australia by a circuitous route- on a ship though, not overland!

As best I can remember it was good for about 80km/h flat out but it was great off the road.

 

 

 

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