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WWII British Aircraft Armament (48407) 1:48


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WWII British Aircraft Armament (48407)

1:48 ICM via H G Hannants Ltd

 

boxtop.jpg

 

During WWII, numerous weapons systems (as we’d call them now) were developed to fight the Axis forces, standardised for mass manufacture, and for ease of interoperability between types of aircraft in use at the time.  These were adapted and improved over time in light of operational experience, the Allies finishing the war with a much more potent arsenal than it started with.

 

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This set depicts some of these designs, and arrives in a small top-opening box with a captive flap on the lower tray.  Inside are four sprues of grey styrene, a decal sheet, two instruction booklets and a pamphlet advertising the recently launched ICM range of acrylic paints that we’ve reviewed on this here forum.  One sprue depicts the British 18” Mk.XII Torpedo that was an air-launched variant of the earlier Mk.XI, entering service in the early 30s.  The Mark.12 was the variant used by the Fleet Air Arm and RAF Coastal Command during WWII, and could be fitted with a break-off wooden tail fairing to reduce entry speed into the water, and the nose was painted red for a training round, or the less visible black for a live round, which goes against the “red for danger” methodology normally used. It is the most complex assembly of the set and has its own booklet that details construction.  The torpedo is made first, built from two halves with a double row of screws and a pair of perpendicular fins at the rear, two of which are moulded-in.  The optional break-off tail is made from two rectangular end panels, with a single horizontal plane stretching between them.  The wooden tail includes the tail fins of the torpedo and is a straight replacement to the standard fins, then a spacer and large spinner are fitted to the front.  The guts of the trolley consists of two scissor jacks, and these are both made from four parts each that are mounted onto a slotted base, then surrounded by a framework with two small balancing wheels at either end.  A short axle projects from the centre of the rails, and these mount a larger wheel with integrated tyre, plus a winder at each end that operates the scissor-jacks (on the real thing).  The torpedo is lowered into the cradle along the trolley’s direction of travel to finish off.

 

sprue1.jpg

 

The other three sprues are identical, containing parts that allow you to make the following:

 

3 x 1,500lb Aerial Mine

6 x GP 250lb Bomb

6 x MC 250lb Bomb

6 x MC 500lb Bomb

6 x GP 500lb Bomb

6 x SAP 250lb Bomb

6 x Bomb Rack, combination of left & right wings, plus two bomb bay racks

 

Each bomb is made from two halves, adding end caps and parachute bundle to the mine, additional fins and circular rings to the majority of the others, and a choice of sway-braces to the bomb racks, depending on which bombs you will be mounting.

 

 

Markings

The torpedo and trailer have no stencils, but the bombs have stencils and designation bands around them, which are curved on the sheet to ensure that they conform to the shape of the weapon they’re intended for.

 

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profiles.jpg

 

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Decals are by ICM’s usual partners, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas.

 

 

Conclusion

A useful set for anyone with a need for munitions for their latest British WWII project.  There are a lot of them in the box, and despite their simple construction, they have plenty of detail moulded-in.

 

Highly recommended.

 

Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd.

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Review sample courtesy of

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Most of these are the prewar weapons.  One detail point is that the top torpedo is not a training weapon (apart from the red nose) but the original version suitable for slow aircraft such as the Swordfish, Vildebeeste etc.  The lower "combat" one was for faster torpedo bombers such as the Beaufort, barracuda etc.  The Monoplane Air Tail at the rear held the torpedo steady so that it entered the water and the right angle and neither broke-up nor dived too deep.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi

    great review

 

  i just ordered a set from a seller in poland due to free shiping to canada 

 

    hopefully they release another set with sbc, 1000lb, etc 

    cheers

       jerry 

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  • 7 months later...

I think it will probably be standard MAP Dark Green. So Tamiya XF-81 RAF Dark Green 2, from the top of my head. Don't use the other paints so can't tell you those sorry.

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  • 2 months later...
On 1/31/2024 at 1:00 PM, treker_ed said:

I think it will probably be standard MAP Dark Green. So Tamiya XF-81 RAF Dark Green 2, from the top of my head. Don't use the other paints so can't tell you those sorry.

The colour used in British Deep Bronze Green

 

Selwyn

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On 31/01/2024 at 11:24, Aeon said:

Hi,

Anyone knows a colour equivalent, of  camouflage green, from Mr.colour, Tamiya, or Ak real color?

Thanks.

AFAIK not made by any of them.

 

A Tamiya mix is this 

https://mafva.co.uk/?p=2607

BS381C: 1930 COLOURS.

Deep Bronze Green BS.24 

Mix: 6 x Humbrol 3 + 3 x Humbrol 10 + 1 x Humbrol 2. 

Tamiya: 8 x XF5 + 5 X XF63 satin over.

In use: 1934-39 then post-war from 1948.

It was used on British vehicles,  but the armament colour was not gloss.

 

There is a Vallejo which is very close.

https://alliedarmour1940.wordpress.com/vallejo-paint-mixes-for-british-armour/

 

Vallejo Model Color

 

24 (Deep Bronze Green)

 

70975 Military Green is just slightly lighter than the BS.381 standard (Mike Starmer, 2019)

 

Description:  Very dark yellow green – a rich black green.

 

35 minutes ago, Selwyn said:

The colour used in British Deep Bronze Green

 

Selwyn

Same as the tank colour?  BS 24? 

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7 hours ago, Troy Smith said:

AFAIK not made by any of them.

 

A Tamiya mix is this 

https://mafva.co.uk/?p=2607

BS381C: 1930 COLOURS.

Deep Bronze Green BS.24 

Mix: 6 x Humbrol 3 + 3 x Humbrol 10 + 1 x Humbrol 2. 

Tamiya: 8 x XF5 + 5 X XF63 satin over.

In use: 1934-39 then post-war from 1948.

It was used on British vehicles,  but the armament colour was not gloss.

 

There is a Vallejo which is very close.

https://alliedarmour1940.wordpress.com/vallejo-paint-mixes-for-british-armour/

 

Vallejo Model Color

 

24 (Deep Bronze Green)

 

70975 Military Green is just slightly lighter than the BS.381 standard (Mike Starmer, 2019)

 

Description:  Very dark yellow green – a rich black green.

 

Same as the tank colour?  BS 24? 

Yes. Now Bs381c 224

Selwyn

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