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On Heather's Workbench - Strike Hard, Strike Sure: RAF Bomber Command 1940


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Looks good to me. 

I find that sometimes it is a question of trial and error depending on the conditions existing, heat, humidity, etc. 

No one ever said modelling was dull. 

Keep at it, what you are doing clearly works. 

Thanks for sharing 

Kevin 

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Looking excellent Heather. The wavy line demarcation has come out perfectly (at least from here).

I'm not sure I'll trust to copydex any time soon though.

 

Ian

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Airfix Wellington MkIC

 

And we're done. Pitot tube stuck in and painted, aerial wire installed, masking all removed - and not much dust inside at all. The side glazing has suffered a little from glue penetration during the build. I’ll consider options to avoid that on the MkII in due course. For @AdrianMF, the props spin. They’re designed to, albeit a little bit wobbly on their pins. The access ladder is in the paint shop and will be posed properly when the official portraits are done for RFI.

 

Airfix Wellington MkIC


Retouching aluminium around the turret locations got me accidentally splodging a bit onto the exterior black. I haven’t decided in the level of weathering, if I do any at all, but I figured a bit of paint chipping in such areas might be expected. The Special Night finish was notoriously prone to weathering, and I’ve not figured out a way to replicate a truly scabby bomber finish without it look absolutely rubbish!

 

I should clear the bench and let the official photographer set up. Thanks for watching along on this build, and for all the comments. Back to the Stirling - after what’s left of the week doing paying work at least!

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In full agreement with what everyone else has said. Looking excellent indeed.

 

Now that i know  of the Copydex idea, I will have to give it a try of course ....

 but carefully!

 

Terry

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It looks good Heather. Years (50?) ago when I acquired the Airfix first edition Wimpy I figured pinking shears would do to cut a scalloped edge for the camo. Never tried it though and have currently invested in masking set for the Airfix Merlin Wimpy. 

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On 7/16/2023 at 11:30 AM, Heather Kay said:

Today I learned that Halfords Grey Acrylic primer is pretty much exactly the same colour as Medium Sea Grey. Let’s just say I couldn’t actually see where I’d applied the MSG for the serial and codes! 

 

It's also very useful for US Neutral Gray too. (But I expect you won't be interested in any contraption painted in that!) 

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With the first of the Wimpys safely in the display cabinet, thoughts return to the Stirling.

 

Airfix Stirling


I did mention things needed some remedial work. There’s a bit of scribing slippage to tidy up, and the modifications to the ailerons leave something to be desired. I also still need to make a better fist of the landing lights. Otherwise, not looking too bad.

 

The turrets are still exercising the old bean, so I decided instead to start taking a proper look at whether my plan to graft the Lanc MkII engines and cowlings onto the Stirling's nacelles is actually feasible or not.

 

Airfix Stirling

 

Raw materials. In theory, I just make up this lot and slap them onto the Stirling wings. In practice, it’s not quite so easy. The most obvious problem is the Lanc props are quite different to the Stirling. That means I’ll need to see if these…

 

Airfix Stirling


… from the Stirling kit can be made to fit. While I am there, I need to use the original kit carburettor intakes as the Lanc ones are, again, quite different.
 

As I am making a rod for my own back by aiming to recreate one of the first ten Stirlings to be delivered, such things as exhausts and lack of oil coolers are also pertinent to this investigation. Did you know the original Hercules installations on the big birds had handed exhausts? They all went outboard. Before long, things were rationalised so the port engine exhausts moved inboard - quite probably to make servicing easier. I expected some work to sort that little conundrum out, but was pleased to find the Lanc engines were arranged in a very similar fashion. In other words, the cowling exhausts were also handed, which will make life a bit simpler. 
 

Now, part of me isn’t too keen on the Lanc's cooling gills being open. I may have to scratch closed replacements. I’ll also need to make four identical exhausts: sadly, neither kit has suitable parts. 
 

There will be quite a bit of fiddling about to do, but I’m pretty confident the engine grafts will work out. First, though, more filler required on the wings!

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There's the possibility of getting a couple of Airfix Beaufighter kits and use the engines and cowlings from those. They do have both carb intakes styles. But, the cowl flaps are still the open type.

As you are modelling the early Stirling, those Lancaster collector rings are wrong, as they show the later type with the outer cover over the main collector.

 

See Fig.12:

 

36409228180_e1090f0950_c.jpg

 

 

 

 

Chris

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6 hours ago, dogsbody said:

As you are modelling the early Stirling, those Lancaster collector rings are wrong, as they show the later type with the outer cover over the main collector.


I have to disagree, Chris! I know. What is the world coming to? :blink:
 

I’m modelling N3641, and the photos I have clearly show the outer cover on the collectors. (Assuming we are talking about the same thing, of course.)

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9 hours ago, Heather Kay said:


I have to disagree, Chris! I know. What is the world coming to? :blink:
 

I’m modelling N3641, and the photos I have clearly show the outer cover on the collectors. (Assuming we are talking about the same thing, of course.)

 

Ah! Well, if you have photographic evidence, then by all means follow that!

 

 

Chris

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Have you given any thoughts to the look of the exhausts yet? The ones fitted to N3641 look very similar to those fitted to Beaufort mk 1s (definitely not the porcupine type fitted to later Stirlings or Lancaster IIs).

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7 minutes ago, elger said:

Have you given any thoughts to the look of the exhausts yet? The ones fitted to N3641 look very similar to those fitted to Beaufort mk 1s (definitely not the porcupine type fitted to later Stirlings or Lancaster IIs).


There has been much cogitating on the exhausts. I’m going to have to scratch build them, because they were, as you say, short. It’s one of those situations where being cleverer and able to create the things in 3D would be helpful. 

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11 hours ago, Heather Kay said:

cleverer

I think you're cleverer enough already, as all the mods so far show.

 

The IWM picture of N3641 shows the cooling gills open on the ground, so using open gills is surely OK?


It looks to me that if you assembled the Lancaster exhausts, sanded down the intakes at the front and the pips on the back, then cut the exhausts short at a level with the rear of the cowling, you would only have to add a short piece of tube with the front edge cut at a suitable offset angle.

 

If you built a little template for cutting the tube at an angle then four off the same would be easy.

 

I think I would be more worried about how to get the engines on straight and level without a big positive mounting location around the edge of the cooling gills.

 

Sorry to blather on but I'm getting aeroplane modelling withdrawal symptoms...

 

Regards,

Adrian

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3 hours ago, AdrianMF said:

Sorry to blather on but I'm getting aeroplane modelling withdrawal symptoms...


That’s bad, but I’m also getting Ark Royal envy!

 

I sat at the bench and assembled the engines and cowlings, as I figured that would be the best way to see if things will fit at all. The answer is, yes, things will fit, with a bit of help.

 

There are gaps all round the cooling gills, designed to fit the various intakes and exhausts. This worried me at first, because I need to rotate the units to suit the Stirling exhaust arrangement and gaps will appear in the wrong places. My initial idea was to remove the moulded gills and replace them with scratched replacements. Then, as Adrian pointed out, the gills were often open on the ground. (Thinking about how radial engines are cooled, the reason should be obvious, but it had escaped me!) now I think I can graft replacement parts in to the gaps.

 

That leaves mounting the units to the Stirling. The Lancaster kit has the engines fitted to the nacelles, and there are pegs at the top and bottom of the cylinder banks that match slots in the cowlings. The whole thing is aligned, as far as I can tell, by the prop shaft and the various intakes. Not as neat a solution as more Airfix recent kits, but acceptable. From quick dry-fits, it seems I may need to add a spacer plate to the Stirling's inner nacelles, but the outer should take the grafts without additional work.

 

The exhausts are still to be worked out. I have some ideas, but I’ll take Adrian’s idea on board as well. I think I can also repurpose the Stirling props to fit the new engines. This crazy idea might just work after all!

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I was doing some work on the Stirling yesterday. I even took some photos. I forgot to update the thread, though.

 

Airfix Stirling


I spent far too much time sorting out divots and niggles. Most of the work was on the wings, but I also worked over the fuselage. I hope to get another witness coat of primer on things later.

 

Airfix Stirling


The tail wheels needed some remedial work. Essentially, one side had been badly moulded. To match the "axle" on the other side, I drilled into each wheel and plugged it with suitable rod. Once the cement had set, I dressed the ends of the plug to tidy things up. Incidentally, I discovered the tail wheel bay was divided into two along the centreline. I need to add a strip to simulate it. The DF teardrop has been tidied, and a bit of work on the antenna mast. The pitot tube has since been replaced by brass rod, and the mast and teardrop have been fitted to the fuselage. 
 

Airfix Stirling

 

The cowlings and engines were assembled yesterday. Having reviewed the cowlings this morning, I decided to plug the gap meant for the carburettor intake. On the Lancaster, this is at the top of the cowling. I have to invert the cowlings for the Stirling, to bring the exhausts to top. I used some thin Evergreen strip, shaped to fit the gap, and I’ll use some filler to refine things once it’s all set hard. You can make out a reinforcing strip inside just for moral support. On the left, you can see the 1975 exhausts and carb intakes. The short intakes are for the MkI, but have massive sink holes. I could fill them, but perhaps it’ll be easier to chop the MkIII longer intakes back. 
 

Airfix Stirling


These are the Lancaster exhausts. Adrian suggested modifying the parts in the right as a basis for some scratch building, which I shall do. Thanks Adrian!

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