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Ferrari 312B, Clay Regazzoni. 1970 Italian GP, Monza. MFH, 1/12.


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Hello,
 
With the Dino 256F1 now complete, another victorious Ferrari at Monza shows the tip of its nose: The Ferrari 312B.
Bye bye V12 and hello flat 12.
 
The hull is prepared, which required a little work, then it is drilled in order to be riveted.

The two elements of the under tray  are welded, the cockpit walls are assembled blank to validate the assembly in the hull.
 
The engine is also assembled , as is the gear box. Some modifications are planned on the engine.

 

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Some panels are riveted because they will remain (slightly…) visible.

 

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Then the whole is assembled and welded quite roughly (strong and invisible) on the chassis.
 
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A test validated the positioning of the parts of the bucket, the engine and its upper plate.
 
The welded frame/bathtub unit fits well into the body.
The front part, in particular the box of the nose gear is being prepared with all its elements.
It is mounted here blank in order to validate the positioning:
- the oblique partition,
- hot air extractor,
- the sharp nose of the beautiful red monster.
 
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These preparation and adjustment phases are long, time-consuming and laborious, but nevertheless necessary.

A lot of drilling, preparation, tests... are carried out on the engine and the accessories.
The injection pump is mounted, the “banjos” oriented in the right direction for the order of injection.
 
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The main elements of the box are assembled.
 
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The pedal box and the master cylinder support await installation in the front box.
 
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Drilling the duct that directs the air from the Naca muzzle intake was no small feat…
 
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The assembly of the elements of the front of the car seem promising.
 
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Let’s take out the masking tape, the “Maskol” for a little masking session.
 
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The parts are then primed.
 
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To finally receive a first coat of Alclad.
 
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The parts are ready for finishing and assembly of the main elements.
 
I didn't go into too much detail as almost everything is hidden.
Only the mechanical pump that I added will be detailed.
The shading and highlights are mostly done, except on the top of the block for the reason mentioned above.
 
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It remains only to cut the tail of the “Tyraps”.
 
Same thing for the gearbox.
Maybe I'll make the master clutch control cylinder...
 
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More soon.

 
Pascal

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Looking forward to this one

I will get round to getting an MFH kit at some point, I keep mooching and hovering, but haven't had the confidence to hit the buy it button yet as I'm still not confident I have the skill and patience to carry out one of these beasts 

 

Ian :) 

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That's quite some work already Pascal - very neat and tidy! Another superb build on the way! :)

 

13 minutes ago, Redstaff said:

I'm still not confident I have the skill and patience to carry out one of these beasts 

 

I've been modelling off and on for over 55 years Ian, and I feel exactly the same!

 

Keith

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Good evening,
 
Thank you guys! 


Sad day for the tifosi, the Scuderia, motorsport enthusiasts.
A great man left us today, Mauro Forghieri joined the other legends of motor racing.
The 312B is now an orphan.
 
The assembly continues with the  intake funnel mesh.
To do this, MFH offers a tool for mesh shaping.
 
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Thanks to which we obtain… NOTHING! Nada! Niente!
 
So I quickly turned a small tool to achieve the result that suits me.
 
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I didn’t enjoy the provided mesh more than that: the mesh is too wide and the material does not hold the shape as much as it should in my opinion.
So I did some tests with tighter mesh steel and 100 mesh brass too.
 
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The best result is, without a doubt, the one obtained with brass.
For ease of forming and holding, the grid is annealed.
Test on stacks:
 
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I have currently made the set for a cylinder bank.
 
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The shape is much better, a coat of Alclad will give the expected shade.
 
More very soon.
 
Pascal

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Fantastic!

What is the size of the brass mesh you are using?

PS - I just saw you said 100 mesh (100 holes per inch), do you know the wire diameter or open area?

 

Malc.

Edited by Malc2
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Mauro would be proud you are building one of his most beautiful creations....

 

Great job with the mesh. How did you cut the shapes out after forming ? I've tried this in smaller scales but struggle to produce a clean edge with the precision required.

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Hi Roger,

Good quality medical grade scissors, I use them on brass PE with no problem, they will still cut paper cleanly afterwards.

You have to be sensible and not to use them on the thick silver PE or piano wire!

They should handle mesh like this easily. I will let you know when I get some!

 

Malc.

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1 hour ago, Malc2 said:

 

Good quality medical grade scissors

Hi Malc,

Scissors are fine for cutting straight edges like radiator meshes, etc. But they're no good for cutting out formed shapes. What you end up with is something like a wobbly table which touches at a couple of points, but there's daylight everywhere else. What's needed is something to grind the cut edge smooth, or a precision cutting method that gives a more accurate cut edge ...

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Good evening Mates,

 

Thanks a lot for your comments! ;) 

@Malc2: this is a mesh with 100 wires per inch.


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@Roger Holden: I use small medical grade scissors as Malc2 does.

They are perfect and I use them for years, cutting PE, decals, all my thermo formed parts like windshields… 


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And now the 12 stacks mesh covers are done. ;) 

Just need to spray Alclad Alu.

 

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Pascal

 

 

 

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Thanks Pascal, I have ordered an A4 sheet!

Should be enough for a few models..........

@Roger Holden another method is to drill a hole in some good tool steel , the same diameter as the formed mesh dome, then harden the steel. Place the formed dome downwards in to the hole, put a ball bearing (about 30% larger than the drilled hole) on top, give it a sharp whack with a hammer and it will cut the edge in a perfect circle. I have done this with copper expanded mesh and it worked very well. Same way as making holes in gaskets for full size engines.

 

Malc.

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50 minutes ago, Malc2 said:

!

@Roger Holden another method is to drill a hole in some good tool steel , the same diameter as the formed mesh dome, then harden the steel. Place the formed dome downwards in to the hole, put a ball bearing (about 30% larger than the drilled hole) on top, give it a sharp whack with a hammer and it will cut the edge in a perfect circle. I have done this with copper expanded mesh and it worked very well. Same way as making holes in gaskets for full size engines.

 

 

Thanks Malc. Now you're talking....sounds like a good method. I can probably adapt a punch set, especially as I'm working in tiny 1/43 scale.  I have some appropriately fine mesh material, although I think it may be nickel silver.  

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Good evening,


Thank you! ;) 
Well, that's it, we now have 12 intake mesh!
 
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The engine is almost finished, it is necessary to take care of the front.
The parts are prepared and test fitted to make sure that there are no anomalies.
Masks are made and identified: the chassis frame was painted black and the aluminum sheets riveted on it.
 
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Then we weld the front partition for more solidity and a better visual aspect in the continuity/junction of the tubes.

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The assembly is again tested in its location to validate a final installation without problem.
 
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The seat, the dashboard, the arch and the support of the rear fins do not seem to be a problem either.
 
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More soon.

Pascal:pilot:

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Good afternoon,
 
 Thank you! ;) 
The structure is painted and the assembly of the elements continues.
 
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I made the connector that supplies the rear brake and clutch master cylinders by soldering copper wire.
It's easier for the front brakes.
 
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Shock absorbers are installed.
The springs are painted black, but they are a bit short…and very stiff to stretch them!
So I quickly turned shims 6.2mm in diameter for 0.5 in thickness: impeccable! (Perfect)
 
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The front box is gradually being completed.
 
First, the small tank that comes in the kit needed a bit of work.
I started to take care of him, but was not satisfied with what I would obtain… I made a new one.
It is turned in a log of 2024 (…) detailed with strips of Speed tape and equipped with a brass tenon also taken out of the lathe.
The front bulkhead is riveted.
 
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Next soon.
 
Pascal:pilot:

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  • 1 month later...

Hi, I have never seen one of these kits but they look superb, I'm liking your work. Excellent result with the intake trumpet mash covers, I'll try to remember your method.

 

Colin

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