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Hasegawa Spitfire IXc in 1/48 scale


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A couple of years ago I bought Hasegawa’s Spitfire IXc in 1/48 scale (you can’t have too many Spits and for me this is the fourth one). After having got the kit I became aware of the heated discussion concerning the error in the length of the kit's rear fuselage, it being 2 mm too short. Well, despite the flaw I didn’t want to throw in the towel. Instead, I built the kit which was of very good quality and a pleasure to assemble.

 

As far as Spitfires are concerned I think more than everything has already been told countless times by experts on these pages. So, I won’t put my spoon in that Spit soup.

 

My model depicts the fighter of the Polish Fighter Squadron No. 316 named "City of Warsaw" (in Polish, 316 Dywizjon Myśliwski "Warszawski") The fighter NH214 of the squadron code SZ-G was the personal mount of flight commander Aleksander Gabszewicz.

 

The register number of this particular fighter, NH214 is at the rear of the fuselage. In another picture the register code BS433 apperars in a Spit with the same squadron code of SZ-G. Not being familiar with the marking systems of the RAF, is it so that the code SZ-G was in use in multiple Spits of the 316 squadron?

 

When building the model I followed the painting instructions of the kit. Afterwards, I have become doubtful of the right colour of the landing gear leg and the rim. Were they really metal coloured? Additionally, I do not know if I chose the right type of rims for my model. Should they have been spoked instead of the disk type ones I used?

 

Well, anyways here is my model, not too weathered and painted with Xtracolor enamels in the normal three tone camo.. As to the Hasegawa decals were thick and brittle. In the building process I managed to ruin a couple of decals and decided to order the Techmod ones for the same fighter. Another aftermark product I used was Eduard’s photo-etch set for the cockpit. I also cut out the cockpit door and left it opened.

 

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16 minutes ago, Russmeister 101 said:

Sensational Spit!

There was a double-take moment with that first picture.... For a moment, I thought it was a reference photo of the real airframe!

Bravo that man!!!! 🏆👏

Thanks Russmeister!

 

Einar 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, BerndM said:

Superp Spitfire. Accurate or not its really Hasegawa quality what you get.

Thanks Berndt! How right you are 👍

 

Einar

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I'm just gonna agree with all of the above. It looks like a damn fine Spitfire to me.

Never really bothered me about finer detail points, like your choice of wheel rims/hubs. Whose to say that maybe it needed replacements and they where the only ones in stock? Likewise the colour of the u/c legs. Maybe the guy in the factory just got pee'd off and forgot to paint em.

It certainly does not in any way detract from what is a lovely model.

Regards

Pete

 

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10 minutes ago, keith in the uk said:

2mm short or not , i would never have guessed and who cares anyway ? to my eyes that s one lovely looking Spitfire ( apart from the Red crow bar )

she s a real beauty.  :goodjob:

 

5 minutes ago, Pete Robin said:

I'm just gonna agree with all of the above. It looks like a damn fine Spitfire to me.

Never really bothered me about finer detail points, like your choice of wheel rims/hubs. Whose to say that maybe it needed replacements and they where the only ones in stock? Likewise the colour of the u/c legs. Maybe the guy in the factory just got pee'd off and forgot to paint em.

It certainly does not in any way detract from what is a lovely model.

Regards

Pete

 

 

10 minutes ago, keith in the uk said:

2mm short or not , i would never have guessed and who cares anyway ? to my eyes that s one lovely looking Spitfire ( apart from the Red crow bar )

she s a real beauty.  :goodjob:

Thanks Keith!

 

Einar 

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9 minutes ago, Pete Robin said:

I'm just gonna agree with all of the above. It looks like a damn fine Spitfire to me.

Never really bothered me about finer detail points, like your choice of wheel rims/hubs. Whose to say that maybe it needed replacements and they where the only ones in stock? Likewise the colour of the u/c legs. Maybe the guy in the factory just got pee'd off and forgot to paint em.

It certainly does not in any way detract from what is a lovely model.

Regards

Pete

 

Thanks Keith for your cudos and the good points. I fully agree with you👍

 

Einar

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On 28/08/2022 at 12:58, Einar said:

Afterwards, I have become doubtful of the right colour of the landing gear leg and the rim. Were they really metal coloured? Additionally, I do not know if I chose the right type of rims for my model. Should they have been spoked instead of the disk type ones I used?

The disks as are covers, they go over the spoked wheel hub. They could be remioved, they were to stop ingress of dirt.

 

On 28/08/2022 at 12:58, Einar said:

The register number of this particular fighter, NH214 is at the rear of the fuselage. In another picture the register code BS433 apperars in a Spit with the same squadron code of SZ-G. Not being familiar with the marking systems of the RAF, is it so that the code SZ-G was in use in multiple Spits of the 316 squadron?

SZ is the squadron code, G is the individual letter.   

There could, and were multiple aircraft with the same individual letter, when aircraft were lost.

 There are occasions when two aircraft had the same letter in the squadron,  can't recall it in a fighter unit,  but seen it for bombers, and they got 'squared'  eg PM-M2  (the highest scoring Lancaster by the way, Mike Squared)  is an example. or they had a bar above or below the letter. It's not common though.

 

OK, some digging.  This maybe the one you asking about? this is 1943,  not the Techmod subject, note the larger G and the the stencil breaks in the SZ

 

 

Spitfire-MkIX-RAF-316Sqn-SZG-Jan-Falkows

 

has the wheel covers. Note Wheel wells, same as wing underside, see below.

 

I was curious, Techmod says NH214 was with 316 Sq in 1943,  but the Spitfire productions site has it being with 6 MU (Maintenance unit) in May 1944.  

Hmm, more digging

https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/72nd_aircraft/spitfire-ix-gabszewicz-1-72-hasegawa-t6277.html

gab_-_foto_5_133.jpg

 

which in the link is listed as Spitfire IX SZ-G NH342 , this is likely the Techmod subject, note the letters are the same as the sheet.

 

But

NH342 LFIX CBAFM66 6MU 1-5-44 AST 18-5-44 317Sq 15-6-44 302Sq 9-11-44 317Sq 11-1-45 CB ops 28-2-45 Miles Aircraft 9MU 15-6-45 165Sq 20-6-46 165Sq 27-6-46 66Sq 2-9-46 sold scrap RJ Coley 3-2-50

from http://www.airhistory.org.uk/spitfire/p079.html

 

which is not listed as with 316 Sq either, but the above photo shows no serial .  The above is late summer 44, note the worn remains of the D-Day stripes,  but trees in leaf and shorts no shirts...

 

Note, wheel wells.  Much debated, after much photo observing, the outer wheel part of the well is 'external'  ie visible when wheel op, and is underside colour,  the inner leg part, is not visible when wheel are up, and is internal colour,  which is aluminium paint until late 1943 or so, the only grey green  bits are the cockpit to the seat bulkhead and the engine bearers.

seen here

Spitfire-MkIX-RAF-64Sqn-at-Fairlop-airfi

 

 

 

On 28/08/2022 at 12:58, Einar said:

The register number of this particular fighter, NH214 is at the rear of the fuselage.

Serial number.

NH214 LFIX CBAF M66, 6MU 6-5-44 82MU 19-5-44 GAL 12-8-44 302Sq 19-10-44 ASTH 1-3-45 39MU 5-7-45 sold Turkey 16-10-47

http://www.airhistory.org.uk/spitfire/p078.html

which is the Spitfire production site, and NH214 is not listed as being with 316 Sq. 

 

So, I have no idea what the serial of SZ-G was, Techmod may have other information,  as they are Polish, and do list their sources, though I know they have used profiles as sources on other sheets which are know to be wrong so...(they did Hurricane JX-E, BE581 in the only know from a profile scheme)  I don't know in this case.

 

Possibly far more than you wanted to know.... hope of interest.  Feel free to ask for any clarifications. 

 

Anyway, model is done,  and is a very neat and tidy build

:goodjob:

 

 

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I have to quote Troy above: very neat and tidy Spitfire – not surprising, with all your beautiful airliners in mind!

 

A couple of finer Spitfire points: the cockpit hatch should hang at an angle, not straight down (you can see it in the second of Troy's photos above); the crowbar would be steel or bronze green, never red on a wartime Spit (warbirds always have it red, though) and; the elevator always droops a bit on a parked Spit (unless it has a stick locking bar installed). Next time… 😉

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

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9 hours ago, Spitfire31 said:

I have to quote Troy above: very neat and tidy Spitfire – not surprising, with all your beautiful airliners in mind!

 

A couple of finer Spitfire points: the cockpit hatch should hang at an angle, not straight down (you can see it in the second of Troy's photos above); the crowbar would be steel or bronze green, never red on a wartime Spit (warbirds always have it red, though) and; the elevator always droops a bit on a parked Spit (unless it has a stick locking bar installed). Next time… 😉

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

Thank you very much for your positive comments and information Joachim. In my future Spits I will keep in mind the points you mentioned! 

 

Best regards,

 

Einar 

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11 hours ago, Troy Smith said:

The disks as are covers, they go over the spoked wheel hub. They could be remioved, they were to stop ingress of dirt.

 

SZ is the squadron code, G is the individual letter.   

There could, and were multiple aircraft with the same individual letter, when aircraft were lost.

 There are occasions when two aircraft had the same letter in the squadron,  can't recall it in a fighter unit,  but seen it for bombers, and they got 'squared'  eg PM-M2  (the highest scoring Lancaster by the way, Mike Squared)  is an example. or they had a bar above or below the letter. It's not common though.

 

OK, some digging.  This maybe the one you asking about? this is 1943,  not the Techmod subject, note the larger G and the the stencil breaks in the SZ

 

 

Spitfire-MkIX-RAF-316Sqn-SZG-Jan-Falkows

 

has the wheel covers. Note Wheel wells, same as wing underside, see below.

 

I was curious, Techmod says NH214 was with 316 Sq in 1943,  but the Spitfire productions site has it being with 6 MU (Maintenance unit) in May 1944.  

Hmm, more digging

https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/72nd_aircraft/spitfire-ix-gabszewicz-1-72-hasegawa-t6277.html

gab_-_foto_5_133.jpg

 

which in the link is listed as Spitfire IX SZ-G NH342 , this is likely the Techmod subject, note the letters are the same as the sheet.

 

But

NH342 LFIX CBAFM66 6MU 1-5-44 AST 18-5-44 317Sq 15-6-44 302Sq 9-11-44 317Sq 11-1-45 CB ops 28-2-45 Miles Aircraft 9MU 15-6-45 165Sq 20-6-46 165Sq 27-6-46 66Sq 2-9-46 sold scrap RJ Coley 3-2-50

from http://www.airhistory.org.uk/spitfire/p079.html

 

which is not listed as with 316 Sq either, but the above photo shows no serial .  The above is late summer 44, note the worn remains of the D-Day stripes,  but trees in leaf and shorts no shirts...

 

Note, wheel wells.  Much debated, after much photo observing, the outer wheel part of the well is 'external'  ie visible when wheel op, and is underside colour,  the inner leg part, is not visible when wheel are up, and is internal colour,  which is aluminium paint until late 1943 or so, the only grey green  bits are the cockpit to the seat bulkhead and the engine bearers.

seen here

Spitfire-MkIX-RAF-64Sqn-at-Fairlop-airfi

 

 

 

Serial number.

NH214 LFIX CBAF M66, 6MU 6-5-44 82MU 19-5-44 GAL 12-8-44 302Sq 19-10-44 ASTH 1-3-45 39MU 5-7-45 sold Turkey 16-10-47

http://www.airhistory.org.uk/spitfire/p078.html

which is the Spitfire production site, and NH214 is not listed as being with 316 Sq. 

 

So, I have no idea what the serial of SZ-G was, Techmod may have other information,  as they are Polish, and do list their sources, though I know they have used profiles as sources on other sheets which are know to be wrong so...(they did Hurricane JX-E, BE581 in the only know from a profile scheme)  I don't know in this case.

 

Possibly far more than you wanted to know.... hope of interest.  Feel free to ask for any clarifications. 

 

Anyway, model is done,  and is a very neat and tidy build

:goodjob:

 

 

Hi Troy Smith! Thank you very much for the cudos and the overwhelming Spit information you took the pains to write to me. I will still read your text many times over and absorb all the points you mentioned.

 

Cheers

 

Einar, the Spit fan :-)

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This is great work! We all know that the Hasegawa Mk.IX is a slightly shorter than it should be, but here it is hardly noticeable.

As for the plane, despite the code "SZ" this Spitfire did not serve with no 316 Squadron, but was the personal aircraft of the commander of the 131st Polish Fighter Wing, and one of the Polish aces, Aleksander Gabszewicz. NH342 was delivered to the Polish Wing just before D-Day, and by that time 316 Squadron was already flying Mustang IIIs. Previously, Gabszewicz had commanded 316 Squadron and had another Spitfire Mk.IX SZ-G. From then on he considered the "SZ-G" a lucky combination and used it as his personal wing commander codes well into 1945. The last Spitfire SZ-G was the Mk.XVI TD240 with a teardrop canopy.

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51 minutes ago, Tomasz Gronczewski said:

This is great work! We all know that the Hasegawa Mk.IX is a slightly shorter than it should be, but here it is hardly noticeable.

As for the plane, despite the code "SZ" this Spitfire did not serve with no 316 Squadron, but was the personal aircraft of the commander of the 131st Polish Fighter Wing, and one of the Polish aces, Aleksander Gabszewicz. NH342 was delivered to the Polish Wing just before D-Day, and by that time 316 Squadron was already flying Mustang IIIs. Previously, Gabszewicz had commanded 316 Squadron and had another Spitfire Mk.IX SZ-G. From then on he considered the "SZ-G" a lucky combination and used it as his personal wing commander codes well into 1945. The last Spitfire SZ-G was the Mk.XVI TD240 with a teardrop canopy.

Thank you Tomasz very much for the detailed info!

 

Einar

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1 hour ago, Tomasz Gronczewski said:

but was the personal aircraft of the commander of the 131st Polish Fighter Wing, and one of the Polish aces, Aleksander Gabszewicz. NH342 was delivered to the Polish Wing just before D-Day, and by that time 316 Squadron was already flying Mustang IIIs. Previously, Gabszewicz had commanded 316 Squadron and had another Spitfire Mk.IX SZ-G. From then on he considered the "SZ-G" a lucky combination and used it as his personal wing commander codes well into 1945. The last Spitfire SZ-G was the Mk.XVI TD240 with a teardrop canopy.

Thanks @Tomasz Gronczewski  for the explanation.  

 

@Einar  one 'quirk' of RAF codes, (among many*) a Wing Commander (usually commanding 3 squadrons) had the privilege of being able to pick his code letters,  very often these were the his initials, classic example of this

72BDB590-498A-4A82-9257-FD3CC964A73B-652

 

Wing Leader – James Edgar ‘Johnnie’ Johnson, 

"Johnson with Spitfire IX, EN398, at Kenley during 1943. Leading the Canadian Wing, 'Johnnie' scored 12 outright aerial victories flying this Spitfire, without having to break off from a sortie due to technical failure, or suffering a scratch due to enemy action."

 

Picking a 'lucky' code is a new on for me, but, well, as the next says

 

*by this, RAF codes are the underappreciated complex part of RAF markings,  there was not specified 'font',  and no running order,  and an unrealsitic size.... so, like SZ-G,  in the pics it read G-SZ on the starboard, and SZ-G on port, but could read SZ-G/SZ-G, or  G-SZ/G-SZ.....  

The more you look, the more you find..

 

cheers

T

 

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37 minutes ago, Troy Smith said:

Thanks @Tomasz Gronczewski  for the explanation.  

 

@Einar  one 'quirk' of RAF codes, (among many*) a Wing Commander (usually commanding 3 squadrons) had the privilege of being able to pick his code letters,  very often these were the his initials, classic example of this

72BDB590-498A-4A82-9257-FD3CC964A73B-652

 

Wing Leader – James Edgar ‘Johnnie’ Johnson, 

"Johnson with Spitfire IX, EN398, at Kenley during 1943. Leading the Canadian Wing, 'Johnnie' scored 12 outright aerial victories flying this Spitfire, without having to break off from a sortie due to technical failure, or suffering a scratch due to enemy action."

 

Picking a 'lucky' code is a new on for me, but, well, as the next says

 

*by this, RAF codes are the underappreciated complex part of RAF markings,  there was not specified 'font',  and no running order,  and an unrealsitic size.... so, like SZ-G,  in the pics it read G-SZ on the starboard, and SZ-G on port, but could read SZ-G/SZ-G, or  G-SZ/G-SZ.....  

The more you look, the more you find..

 

cheers

T

 

Thanks Troy again for leading me deeper into the exiting world of RAF markings and codes:-)

 

Cheers

Einar

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