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Buccaneer intake colour.


Muzz
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Intake colors are a difficult one and specific photos should be sourced if you endeavor to be precise.  It varied from green to off white or the blue grey like wheel wells and the inside of the air brake (until the 80s at least for the air brake which Airfix has wrong on the paint diagrams).  Throw weathering in the mix and it becomes even more uncertain.  I think green is a good choice for your era/scheme choice, but that could be dark grey.

Edited by wadeocu
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Yes, I knew there were a few variables in there. Thanks for your reply, going to go with green I think.👍

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Worth having a look in the Walkround section here on BM. There's several Buccs to be found, loads of detail including some intakes. Unfortunately, some have fOD covers on but XV350 has a picture straight down an intake and it's definitely green inside. 

 

I often forget what a brilliant resource the walkround  section is. 

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4 hours ago, 825 said:

 

 

I often forget what a brilliant resource the walkround  section is. 

There is a lot of good stuff hidden in there

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3 hours ago, tweeky said:

Why do people call Intake and exhaust blanks..... FOD covers ? after all FOD is actually Foreign Object  Damage  

I always thought it was because they are intended to prevent ingress of foreign objects and thus prevent Foreign Object Damage. I may be wrong and there is another more correct term for them. 

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5 hours ago, tweeky said:

Why do people call Intake and exhaust blanks..... FOD covers ? after all FOD is actually Foreign Object  Damage  

What SHOULD they be called then?  You can't just throw that down & not follow through with an answer!🥴

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On 8/25/2022 at 6:29 PM, Graham T said:

What SHOULD they be called then?  You can't just throw that down & not follow through with an answer!🥴

I think I answered that in the question Why do people call Intake and Exhaust Blanks...... FOD covers.

 

 

In my time on Lightning, Jaguars and Tornado's they were always know as blanks. The only covers were the Pitot, and covers that when over things like Canopy's Main wheels, theses were only used for storage or if a jet was left outside.  

 

Bungs went it little holes (static vents and the likes).  Locks when in movable things like undercarriage, arrestor hook and canopy some times things like airbrakes when you was working on the system and didn't want them closing on you.

Edited by tweeky
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12 hours ago, wschurr said:

USAF jargon was intake/exhaust cover. We also had a foam filled one that could fit inside the nozzle. We called those “butt plugs”

But its a UK jet operated by HM armed forces. USAF has their own jargon plus their own systems.

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On 8/25/2022 at 12:36 PM, tweeky said:

Why do people call Intake and exhaust blanks..... FOD covers ? after all FOD is actually Foreign Object  Damage  

It's a bit of anomaly. May it should be called PFOD as in potential FOD. But it's  become the standard  term in aviation. Every  airport has bins marked FOD where you deposit anything that could potentially cause FOD.

Once something slammed into the side of the fuselage as I was taking off from a major airport. I immediately reported to the tower that I'd been hit by some  FOD which is ridiculous if you  think about it. But everyone knew what I meant. 

That's the point. That everyone understands.

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On 8/29/2022 at 6:54 PM, noelh said:

It's a bit of anomaly.

No its Not, the RAF call them what they call them, it drummed into you on basic trade training chocks, locks, bungs and blanks when ever a jet is on the ground.

Edited by tweeky
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  • 3 weeks later...

Always “blanks” in the RN, too.  “FOD guards” was an expression that was used, but in my experience it meant permanent structures (e.g the Sea King “barn door” or the Lynx grilles over the ECU intakes.

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