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What to do??? New or Repair


Paul J
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My NIkon A900 decided to throw a wobbler on me yesterday. The lens started to clunk during operation and then decided to do somersaults and not retract properly with the eyelid bit not closing. I've only had it since Feb 2019.  I got a quote for a repair but is just short of 200.  Ouch. But, do I do this or go for a new one of same make and model for nearly 280. ???

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Considering that a brand-new camera (with warranty) is not a huge amount more than the repair, I would recommend going for new. I know from personal experience that Sony video-camera spare parts are EXTREMELY expensive. I would be surprised if their still-camera parts are far behind, in terms of price. 

 

Hope this helps. 

 

Chris.  

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If the price difference doesnt bother you............................Its not much is it?  Go for new, if only for piece of mind and the knowledge that you have a new guarantee

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Cannot agree more with what has been said already, or save and buy something better.

 

Might be worth asking Nikon why it has broken after such a short time?

 

Andy

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My father in law had a Nikon that started playing up when only a year or two old.  After a bit of back and forth it was completely repaired at no charge to him, but a lot to SONY for a whole batch of defective cameras they’d supplied the offending parts to Nikon for!!!

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Having a quick look at various things - you could claim under the Consumer rights act 2015 that the camera should not have broken within such a short period of time. Under the old Sale of goods Act, you should not expect good to break or fail within 6 years of purchase (that is for new goods), however, under the new Consumer Rights Act (2015) things changed slightly, and now they talk about durability and the difference between cheaper goods and more expensive goods - for example - you would not expect a cheap £10 kettle off the market to last as long as a more expensive £100 branded item from Harrods, so if the market item broke after 4 years you would have had good value from it and it would have lasted a reasonable time scale, but if the item from Harrods broke after a week, then you expect them to sort it pretty quickly!

 

Similarly with your camera, you would not expect a £280 camera to break within 3.5 years! If it's anything like my old Nikon, it had a small internal battery that would keep the settings when swapping batteries, that gave up and I would have to re-set everything that would not be covered by anything and could not get that repaired (replaced after 10 years of use, but still working, and kept as a back-up!). The camera itself however, was still working perfectly fine, and had no problems with it at all! 

 

It's always worth trying that approach - they may not repair for free, but get the repair cost reduced. Alternatively try to find a specialist camera shop to see if they can carry out the repair.

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Thanks for all your comments and suggestions. When I looked up the cost of the same model camera I didn't notice that the 280 price tag was for a used second hand one. Not for me that. I found that a new one will be around 480 ish. And I can't seem to find one on line anywhere. So I have decided to go with the repair. Incidentally, I bought this one in New Zealand while on a holiday over there because I ruined  the Canon I had wth me at the time so that might make things tricky to claim on.

It will also save on recycling, landfill etc and the fact that I won't have to 're learn' as one would with a new camera. So, it's going to a very local proper camera repair shop and hope for the best.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Not wanting to shoot-down the idea of getting you old camera repaired, but it's worth remembering that (most) repair-centres will only give you an official, one or two month guarantee on the work they do. I have read one or two stories of repair places flatly refusing to consider failed cameras from just outside this warranty-period, but these places are obviously not at all concerned about having repeat-custom. IMHO, they deserve to fail with that attitude. 

 

I'll leave that with you. Whatever to decide to do, I wish you all the best. 

 

Cheers.

 

Chris.  

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If I'd had a relatively expensive camera go US after only a couple of years I would first try the consumer tactic suggested by @treker_ed, and if that's not successful I'd go for a different brand and model, as you might well suffer that same problem with the new one in a couple of years.  You're also leaving that brand as an expression of your dissatisfaction with their products.  I've done that with Samsung, as so much of their gear is shoddy and they offer minimal support for software after you've purchased it.  They might not feel it from just me, but if everyone shows their disgust in the same way it'll hit them where they do care.  Their bottom line.  Screw 'em! :poop:

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19 minutes ago, Mike said:

If I'd had a relatively expensive camera go US after only a couple of years I would first try the consumer tactic suggested by @treker_ed, and if that's not successful I'd go for a different brand and model, as you might well suffer that same problem with the new one in a couple of years.  You're also leaving that brand as an expression of your dissatisfaction with their products.  I've done that with Samsung, as so much of their gear is shoddy and they offer minimal support for software after you've purchased it.  They might not feel it from just me, but if everyone shows their disgust in the same way it'll hit them where they do care.  Their bottom line.  Screw 'em! :poop:

 

Trouble is that he bought it in New Zealand, so I don't think you us UK consumer laws.  Also, even if you could get Nikon to consider a warranty repair, they might insist that you return it to the Australasia repair centre at your cost.

 

For what it's worth, sounds like the OP has committed to a repair - not what I would have done for the sake of £80 but he is free to do as he wants.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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2 minutes ago, nheather said:

not what I would have done for the sake of £80 but he is free to do as he wants.

A total of £280 if he wants a new one. :owww:

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The trouble is, I bought the camera in New Zealand  back in 2019 so taking it back is a no brainer. I could contact Nikon here in the UK but I feel it will be a bit of faffing around. And the fault may have been a bit to do with me .

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5 hours ago, nheather said:

 

Trouble is that he bought it in New Zealand, so I don't think you us UK consumer laws.  Also, even if you could get Nikon to consider a warranty repair, they might insist that you return it to the Australasia repair centre at your cost.

 

For what it's worth, sounds like the OP has committed to a repair - not what I would have done for the sake of £80 but he is free to do as he wants.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

I mentioned that a new one would be around 280 but on checking back,  it was an e bay price for a used one. A brand new one of the same model goes for near twice that. So going for a repair ses the only way or find something else.

 

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On 8/29/2022 at 11:38 AM, treker_ed said:

Having a quick look at various things - you could claim under the Consumer rights act 2015 that the camera should not have broken within such a short period of time. Under the old Sale of goods Act, you should not expect good to break or fail within 6 years of purchase (that is for new goods), however, under the new Consumer Rights Act (2015) things changed slightly, and now they talk about durability and the difference between cheaper goods and more expensive goods - for example - you would not expect a cheap £10 kettle off the market to last as long as a more expensive £100 branded item from Harrods, so if the market item broke after 4 years you would have had good value from it and it would have lasted a reasonable time scale, but if the item from Harrods broke after a week, then you expect them to sort it pretty quickly!

 

 

It be honest if something broke within a week no matter if it was £10 or £100 you would be entitled to a full refund or replacement anyway 😉

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11 hours ago, Paul J said:

I mentioned that a new one would be around 280 but on checking back,  it was an e bay price for a used one. A brand new one of the same model goes for near twice that. So going for a repair ses the only way or find something else.

 


Thanks, missed that - that does make a repair a more sensible option.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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