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Best WW2 Allied (1/72) model for a newbie


Geo1966
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Thank you for all of the great advice.

 

I have decided to go with the Eduard 1/72 Spitfire F Mk.IX Weekend Edition Model Kit 7460, as @Mark Harmsworth suggested in the first reply. Will do it in the PR version (as a couple of people suggested) so not to hard a paint scheme (hopefully), also it will brighten up my display cabinet next to the various olive drab tanks!

 

I do have 3 years experience of modelling 1/35 armour, so should be ok with the fiddly bits, but I bottled it on the ProfiPack version as i think the PE would kill me 😄

 

Happy for you to keep adding to this tread as it gives me more ideas for future builds (if this one works out). Might start a WIP as i think i might need some help.............

 

Thanks again,

George

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4 hours ago, Hairy Stickler said:

apply a clay wash

What is this strange thing you speak of? Do i need this, and if so, who makes it please?

 

George

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13 minutes ago, Geo1966 said:

What is this strange thing you speak of? Do i need this, and if so, who makes it please?

 

George

 

Hi George,

 

Have a watch of this.  I have just started experimenting with this product (I believe that there are other similar washes available).  Previously,  I was mixing up washes using chalk pastels but there were too grainy.

 

All the best 

 

Peter 

 

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I bought some Flory washes after reading about others using them to great effect in RFI and also watching the Flory video.

 

Personally I found them to be a waste of money as the rubbing often lifts/breaks decals and the wash can only be applied when nothing remotely breakable is attached to the model. Plus when I applied an enamel varnish after the wash the effects, such as they were, completely disappeared. I now use acrylic washes, made from the acrylic paint sold in tubes from art shops (which look like oils) with de-ionised water and a drop of washing up liquid, plus Tamiya pastel weathering sets.

 

As I use enamel varnishes, perhaps a little old school, I can't use thinner based washes, which most washes seem to be, so this is a good compromise for me and considerably cheaper than the Flory stuff, which I've now binned.

 

Regards

Colin.

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Best bet is to check the kit out on Scalemates as this will show the origin of the kit and allow you to know if you are building a relatively modern kit or a much cruder re-box from the 1980's or even earlier.

 

Regards

Colin.

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19 hours ago, contrite said:

I bought some Flory washes after reading about others using them to great effect in RFI and also watching the Flory video.

 

Personally I found them to be a waste of money as the rubbing often lifts/breaks decals and the wash can only be applied when nothing remotely breakable is attached to the model. Plus when I applied an enamel varnish after the wash the effects, such as they were, completely disappeared. I now use acrylic washes, made from the acrylic paint sold in tubes from art shops (which look like oils) with de-ionised water and a drop of washing up liquid, plus Tamiya pastel weathering sets.

 

As I use enamel varnishes, perhaps a little old school, I can't use thinner based washes, which most washes seem to be, so this is a good compromise for me and considerably cheaper than the Flory stuff, which I've now binned.

 

Regards

Colin.

Sorry to hear about your experiences with these Colin but i always make sure that the underlying gloss coat is completely dry before applying the wash (as per the video), and I never attach any readily breakable parts until right at the end of the build (weathering them separately if necessary).

 

Still there is no one size fits all in this hobby!😀

 

Regards

 

Peter 

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Good luck with the Eduard Spit. I have the Profi Pack version and some of that etch scares me (canopy grab handles in multi part brass in 1/72-are they having a larf!?) Read the instructions and use Tamiya extra thin sparingly. Filler should be minimal. 
 

Cheers

 

Trevor

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I must confess I used the Flory washes over a satin varnish to try and get some extra grab to tone down the general area as well highlight the panel lines, but I did apply the enamel varnish and left it for some 48 hours before applying the Flory.

 

My biggest issue was that when I applied my final enamel matt varnish all the effects completely disappeared which was rather disappointing so I contacted the Florys to see if I'd done something wrong. They replied that a top coat of varnish shouldn't make the clay effect disappear but in reality it did so I've decided to come up with my own approach using the 'tube' acrylics, which I have to say seem to work quite well as an alternative - plus it is far cheaper to boot.

 

I appreciate I'm in a minority in that I don't use acrylic varnishes at any stage, so can't use any of the various thinner based washes, so my hands on experience of Flory is rather disappointing as this seemed to provide me with a method that wouldn't eat away at my varnish and paint. But as you say each to their own and my modelling and weathering skills admittedly are very much on the modest side.

 

Regards

Colin.

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On 8/23/2022 at 6:56 PM, contrite said:

I must confess I used the Flory washes over a satin varnish to try and get some extra grab to tone down the general area as well highlight the panel lines, but I did apply the enamel varnish and left it for some 48 hours before applying the Flory.

 

My biggest issue was that when I applied my final enamel matt varnish all the effects completely disappeared which was rather disappointing so I contacted the Florys to see if I'd done something wrong. They replied that a top coat of varnish shouldn't make the clay effect disappear but in reality it did so I've decided to come up with my own approach using the 'tube' acrylics, which I have to say seem to work quite well as an alternative - plus it is far cheaper to boot.

 

I appreciate I'm in a minority in that I don't use acrylic varnishes at any stage, so can't use any of the various thinner based washes, so my hands on experience of Flory is rather disappointing as this seemed to provide me with a method that wouldn't eat away at my varnish and paint. But as you say each to their own and my modelling and weathering skills admittedly are very much on the modest side.

 

Regards

Colin.

 

Clear coats do tend to tone down any weathering effect so better accentuate these a bit more if one or more coats will be applied on top. Of course this means that it's hard to be sure of how much weathering is needed and only experience can help in deciding how much of the effect will still be visible after the final coat.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 8/18/2022 at 6:11 PM, tempestfan said:

 

Move up one scale and get the Eduard Weekend F6F. Not sure how they are priced right now but the 2 or 3 I have cost under 10 € each. I think Eduard also does a 1/72 kit of the Hellcat, which probably is also very inexpensive as a Weekend boxing and should be very well detailed if it shares with its bigger brother.

 

I was going to mention the 1/72 Hellcat as well. One of the best kits I have ever built, and the weekend edition is cheap, easily available and a very quick build because of the simple color scheme (overall Dark Sea Blue).

 

As for washes, I use aquarel paints from Winsor & Newton, but really a tray of kids paints from a poundshop will get you started as well for, well, a pound. They are easy to apply and easy to remove in case of foul-ups. Add the tiniest drop of washing up liquid to break the surface tension and enhance the capillary effect.

Edited by sroubos
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