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Project #2 : Round Table Class Minesweeper HMS Sir Lancelot (1/96th scratchbuild)


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6 hours ago, Steve D said:

Just spotted this thread, nice subject, I must buy that book. 

 

Everyone knows I hate plastic but you're doing a great job with it and nice to see some shell plating, that clipper stern is tough. 

 

Personally, I don't think individual planks can be used below 1:48th scale, sheet marking is finer, but you've set a high standard with this one, 👍

 

The maritime bug is strong, it's held me for over 25 years

 

Cheers

 

Steve

Thanks for the feedback... I think plastic has its place, I find its good for medium sized work (superstructure etc) but going too big or too small with it can lead to problems because of the softness. I'm definitely close to the edge with the planking, although the scale width is 15cm there is a tendency for the caulking to be too prominent unless you're careful with the regularity of the planks and/or cut back the colour. Wood is just so tactile !

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  • 1 month later...

A bit more progress, very difficult to sit indoors when the weather is so glorious (well thats my excuse anyway). After some priming/shading i've almost completed the rivets. I just hope the little devils are still visible after painting and that washes/weathering will bring them out a little.

 

rivets1

 

rivets2

 

These are what i've been using  https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/QRV-018?result-token=FWBdY . Pricey but to put it in context the entire hull has used about a pack and a half leaving me with plenty for the superstructure etc. They are normal waterslide decals with a thin carrier film and go on very easily.   

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Per Michal's earlier post, at least two of the Round Table class trawlers were painted in a Western Approaches scheme: Sir Kay (white and WA Blue and perhaps WA Green it seems) and Sir Lamorak (I assume that in the latter, the WA Blue and perhaps WA Green has simply been rendered imperceptible by the bright sunlight):

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

 

They appear to be wearing a variant of the scheme depicted in Plates 26 and 27 in C.A.F.O. 679/42, which can be obtained here:

https://www.sovereignhobbies.co.uk/products/printed-royal-navy-camouflage-c-a-f-o-679-42-sea-going-camouflage-designs-for-destroyers-and-small-ships

 

Basically two trapezoidal and one triangular panels in WA Blue and Green (or maybe just WA Blue) on the hull, and rectangular or triangular panels of WA Blue and Green (or just WA Blue) on parts of the superstructure.

 

HTH!

 

Mike E. 

 

 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/22/2023 at 7:54 PM, michaele said:

Per Michal's earlier post, at least two of the Round Table class trawlers were painted in a Western Approaches scheme: Sir Kay (white and WA Blue and perhaps WA Green it seems) and Sir Lamorak (I assume that in the latter, the WA Blue and perhaps WA Green has simply been rendered imperceptible by the bright sunlight):

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

 

They appear to be wearing a variant of the scheme depicted in Plates 26 and 27 in C.A.F.O. 679/42, which can be obtained here:

https://www.sovereignhobbies.co.uk/products/printed-royal-navy-camouflage-c-a-f-o-679-42-sea-going-camouflage-designs-for-destroyers-and-small-ships

 

Basically two trapezoidal and one triangular panels in WA Blue and Green (or maybe just WA Blue) on the hull, and rectangular or triangular panels of WA Blue and Green (or just WA Blue) on parts of the superstructure.

 

HTH!

 

Mike E. 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for taking the time to post the information. It would be great if Lancelot or Galahad wore a similar scheme but all the photos just show "grey" and they didn't even seem to wear pennants so rather drab. I suppose i could have gone for one of the class with "A" frame but prefer the lines of the 2 without.

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Any a little more progress, after rivetting i was eager to see if a couple of coats of paint would hide them and am very happy to report that they don't. The photos are taken with a camera phone so they are hard to see but they are there and hopefully when i get to washes and dot filters etc i will be able to bring them out a little more.

 

I used colourcoats paints which airbrushed on really nicely when mixed about 50/50 with bog standard white spirit. I've never had much luck with airbrushing and up until now have always approached it with almost a sense of dread but finally i think i'm getting the hang of it. Basically several very thin coats of paint suitably diluted, sounds easy but it has eluded me up until now.

 

I've also now applied some depth markings, i was originally going to use the BECC offering but they just won't settle on the rivetted hull so found these waterslide decals that were just the right size and went on easily.

 

IMG_1386

 

https://www.themightybrush.com/product/roman-numerals-waterslide-transfers-decals/

 

I can now get down to detailing the decks and superstructure (the really fun stuff) although part of that will involve me getting some custom photo etch made which will be a new experience.....

 

Anyway apologies for the quality of the photos i will get some properly lit ones organised down the road.

 

IMG_1398

 

IMG_1399

 

IMG_1400

 

 

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I laminated a funnel earlier but even after much sanding i wasn't happy with it so have decided to make it from 2 vacformed halves. Anyway spent an afternoon sitting in the garden sanding and now have a master for the funnel and the oropesa float ....

 

IMG_1401

 

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Just catching up with this, lovely job you are doing here, those rivets really work, seriously impressive piece of model making !!

 

Funny handshake from the fellow "scratchers"

 

David

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On 10/6/2022 at 8:38 AM, Bandsaw Steve said:

I Love what you are doing on this one!

 

I particularly like what you have done with the plating. I have to make a similar ‘to plate or not to plate’ decision on Xantho soon and you are pushing me in the ‘have a crack at it’ direction. 🤔

 

Having gone through the process i'm not sure i'd do it again tbh. I spent a lot of time trying to flood small gaps between the plates with mr surfacer so i could avoid sanding and losing the edges the plates are intended to provide. I think with hindsight i'd probably mask off areas and build them up with primer and scribe some lines for the joints. I can definitely recommend the rivets though even after a couple of coats of paint and varnish they are still there to see and feel (although my cruddy photos don't show them).

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I used some .5mm plastic card bolted into my high tech vacforming machine to produce the funnel / oropesa halves.

 

IMG_1408

 

This is basically an mdf box with a vacuum connector sticking out of the side and lots of small holes drilled into the top. Its made as airtight as possible using bathroom silicone on the inside. The masters are glued onto small mdf plinths so the plastic can form a sharp edge when it is pulled over the molds. The wingnuts hold the plastic and a securing frame in place. I then use a little vaseline on the masters to make the process of separating the parts easier. Put the whole thing under a grill for 30 seconds and switch on the vacuum. Plastic, petroleum jelly and heat what could possibly go wrong ?!?

 

Here is one after grilling....

IMG_1407

 

and after i've wrestled the molds from the plastic sheet...

IMG_1409

 

A bit of cleaning up, some plating and rivets (of course) and they should do the job. Now onto something slightly less hazardous......

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Finally started the work on detailing up the decks and superstructure, starting from the stern for some reason.....

 

IMG_1467

 

 

The depth charges are 3D printed from Shapeways. There are still a lot of details to add to the area in the picture, depth charge racks, crane, reels, hinges on the water tanks and other boxes, vents etc etc. I'm going to investigate custom PE for some of these are the size and detail are beyond my saveloy fingers. Next job will be the rails for the carley float and the platform for the lifeboat. The lifeboat itself will probably be another job for the vac form box and i haven't yet worked out a strategy for the clinkering on it so if anyone has any bright ideas on that please feel free to share !

Edited by theskits62
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Great job!  👍

 

It's amazing how these draught scales rise so high on the hull... 

 

When you get to 18 feet, you know you're sinking... 😂

 

Capture-d-e-cran-2023-08-19-a-22-56-39.j

 

I had designed a cannon for this type of ship.

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, Iceman 29 said:

Great job!  👍

 

It's amazing how these draught scales rise so high on the hull... 

 

When you get to 18 feet, you know you're sinking... 😂

 

Capture-d-e-cran-2023-08-19-a-22-56-39.j

 

I had designed a cannon for this type of ship.

 

Thanks for posting the link to your work on the 12 pounder, as well as being being really useful it is incredibly impressive ! I've been following your Bretagne project (superb) but must have missed this one. 

 

 

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Another trickle of progress. Wasn't looking forward to the gallows as they have an "H" profile so had to be fashioned with sand paper rather than bending. Also made the oropesa cranes and finalised the oropesas themselves (apart from the lifting handle which will be brass). You can also see the master for the lifeboat which will be vacformed. At this rate i should be done round about 2030.....

 

IMG_1493

 

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Next job on the (long) list is the compass deck. One feature of this is a raised grating that houses the compass/binnacle. I was originally going to PE this but decided to have a go at making it with a milling machine.

 

I’ve come to realise that I need more power tools, up until now I tend to rely on hand held drills etc and I figured it was about time I got a drill press. I was looking at the proxxon offering but then decided on an MF70 mill that I found on ebay. I figured that since I rarely drill more then 1mm into anything the slow z axis feed on the mill wouldn’t be an issue.

 

Anyway the basic process was to make a simple jig and mill a 0.5mm wide and deep trench across it. At right angles to this I then milled 0.25mm deep trenches (again 0.5mm wide) 1mm apart. I then inserted 0.5mm by 0.5mm evergreen strips into the main trench and used the shallower trenches as guides to mill out half the depth on the strip.

 

Repeat this many times !! The idea was then that these pieces would slot together to give me the grating. Didn’t think it would work but it did although it took 5 hours and the end result is smaller than a postage stamp !!

 

IMG_1500

 

IMG_1499

 

IMG_1501

 

 

 

 

 

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Great progress on this really interesting topic.  Interesting detail on vacuforming thanks for that explanation. While I struggle to understand people shying away from using metal in place of plastic, I really appreciate to skill on display here

 

cheers

 

steve

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5 hours ago, Steve D said:

Great progress on this really interesting topic.  Interesting detail on vacuforming thanks for that explanation. While I struggle to understand people shying away from using metal in place of plastic, I really appreciate to skill on display here

 

cheers

 

steve

 

 

I definitely do want to transition more towards wood/brass but tbh I’m not sure I’d know where to start, particularly when it comes to working with brass. Basic jobs like cutting/joining etc particularly small parts, feel like they would be quite difficult, hopefully thats more down to my lack of knowledge/experience.  Presumably I’d also need a lathe and to learn the art of soldering. I think I will take the plunge when it comes to project #3 by which time I will hopefully have retired and have found the room for a dedicated workshop rather than camping out on the dining room table. In the meantime I’ll watch and hopefully learn from your Havock project !

 

Thanks

Brett

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I thought it was about time i started some work on the minesweeping winch and windlass since these are 2 of the bigger and more complex deck items remaining. The plans don't include a lot of detail on the winch and i was wondering if anyone has any idea where i can find more information on this ???

 

winch_plan_2

 

 

winch_plan_1

 

As you can see the plans don't really give you much more than an outline. I found a coupe of useful images which give more detail but unfortunately both from the same side.

 

minesweeping winch_2

 

minesweeping winch

 

At 1/96th the winch will only be a couple of cms across so i won't be able to do more than create an impression of the main points but I'd like to try to get some more info on the other side where the controls are.

 

My other question is whether it is possible to buy something that will pass as the cable on this. Ropes of scale ( https://ropesofscale.com/) looks like the best bet so far but i was wondering if anyone knows where i could buy woven metal wire preferably 0.25mm diameter or smaller ??

 

Thanks

Brett

 

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On 03/09/2023 at 14:12, theskits62 said:

I’ll watch and hopefully learn from your Havock project

Thanks for the vote of confidence Brett, I try to explain everything I do (and also the stuff I get wrong) to encourage others to take a more classical path.  Personally, I can't make plastic sheet do anything I like so watching this thread and other scratchbuilds in plastic leaves me speechless.

 

There are two tools I cannot live without, a mini-drill with sanding disks and my oxy-propane torch with micro jet.  Everything I do in metal involves these key tools.  Master using oxy-propane and hard solder (actually easier than soft solder once you get the hang of it) and you can make anything.  Obviously a lathe helps a lot as well...

 

Lastly, I know my techniques work at 1/48th scale, but have zero experience in smaller scales.  The robustness of the materials work at the scale I use, but would suffer when you go smaller, what people do with PE at tiny scales simply mystifies me...

 

Sir Lancelot is a really impressive build, I bought the book and am tempted once the long list of vessels I have me eye on gets a little shorter

 

If I can help you with the PE artwork or resin items, please drop me a PM, I'm always happy to assist scratch-builders

 

Cheers

 

Steve

 

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