Jump to content

Using Ammo weathering products?


TeaWeasel
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've made a small investment in some of Ammo's weathering products, mainly the Streaking Effect, a couple of Oilbrushers, Ammo's own thinner and some brushes, but I'm having trouble achieving anything close to the effect even after following the techniques on AMmo's videos.

 

The issue I'm having is two-fold; either the product is just obliterated by any thinner applied or it just leaves horrible brushstreaks. I had some success previously using an Oilbrusher but it wasn't much, still didn't look that realistic. 

 

With that in mind I have a few questions I haven't been able to find out myself:

  • How much product and thinner should I apply ideally?
  • How should I apply the Oilbrushers? I've seen videos of them applied in thin streaks or large blobs, neither seems to work.
  • How long do I need to wait for the product to dry before working on it?

 

Cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, TeaWeasel.

 

I'm a bit confused here. I'm certainly no expert on weathering matters, but I thought the technique for adding "modulating" streaks was to put a small dot of colour on the surface and then use a feathered-edge brush to spread the colour in a very, very thin, diffused layer and break up the uniformity of the background paint. If you can see any of the added colour directly, you need to diffuse it a lot more. I would take an educated-guess that letting the paint-spots dry is a bad idea. They need to be as flexible / wet as possible.  

 

I can understand it's a bit frustrating seeing the excellent results achieved in the demo-videos, but these guys have been doing their thing for years and probably use all the tricks-of-the-trade without even thinking about it. 

 

Keep going and let us know how you're getting on. 

 

Cheers. 

 

Chris.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, spruecutter96 said:

Hi, TeaWeasel.

 

I'm a bit confused here. I'm certainly no expert on weathering matters, but I thought the technique for adding "modulating" streaks was to put a small dot of colour on the surface and then use a feathered-edge brush to spread the colour in a very, very thin, diffused layer and break up the uniformity of the background paint. If you can see any of the added colour directly, you need to diffuse it a lot more. I would take an educated-guess that letting the paint-spots dry is a bad idea. They need to be as flexible / wet as possible.  

 

I can understand it's a bit frustrating seeing the excellent results achieved in the demo-videos, but these guys have been doing their thing for years and probably use all the tricks-of-the-trade without even thinking about it. 

 

Keep going and let us know how you're getting on. 

 

Cheers. 

 

Chris.  

 

Cheers Chris. I'd initially tried that method but I saw another video where the colour was applied in rough lines. I went back just applying a dot and it seems to have come out ok. I tested it out on a couple of spare parts from the TSR-2 which I also tested the chipping medium on. 

 

20220729_153740

 

 

20220729_153745

 

 

The Streaking Effect I'm not really that happy with, as it was still mostly obliterated as soon as the thinner was applied. The rest is actually not bad if I don't say so myself. The black streaks of Starsthip Filth* are a bit too stark but again, I'm happy with the overall result.

 

*Yeah it's actually misspelt on the packaging.

 

Cheers,

Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, Joe.

 

The TSR-2 bits look very good, to my eye.

 

I once saw a weathering demo at a model-show, which used Marmite as the chipping-medium (someone had to find a decent use for it, eventually!). I have often wondered if toothpaste could be used for chipping, as it will naturally stay in place once it's applied. 

 

I've also seen folks apply chipping with a small bit of low-density packing-foam, twisted from side-to-side to vary the chipping pattern. 

 

I guess it's a case of whatever works well for you...

 

Chris.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a very friendly word of advice, here (not a criticism). Some of the chipping looks a bit "carefully-applied" to my eye - and not random. I fully understand how this happens - I've done it myself. There's always the feeling of "just a little bit more and then it's done!". If you can, I'd recommend stopping application the very moment you think that. Less is definitely more in this situation. 

 

There's always the urge to fill all the space you have. In nature, there are nearly always awkward gaps and unaffected patches in things, which modellers often forget or ignore.

 

You see it in dioramas all the time. Most model-makers are inclined to fill every last inch of spare ground with branches, shell-cases, guns, spare ammo, discarded helmets, etc, etc. I fully understand why they do it, but "natural" it ain't.

 

Hope this helps. 

 

Chris.      

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Joe,

 

From my experience with Mig's Streaking Effects, it's a case of dot on small amounts, then streak them in the direction you want to go with a barely-damp brush (meaning dipped in a little thinner, then dry almost all of it off). If the brush has too much thinner, it will simply remove the effect. Once you've done it once, you need to go back and do it all again until you're happy. It's very subtle, but then you have greater control. Also, by working with smaller amounts of the product and thinner, it should dry much quicker.

 

I haven't used Oilbrushers, as it's just thinned oil paint in a package which, in my opinion, delivers far too much at a time. It seems wasteful to me, and I can get much more precise application by thinning actual oil paint with Turpenoid and using a 00 brush to apply it where I want. Perhaps dabbing the Oilbrusher brush into a bottle cap, then using a brush from that might help?

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the feedback everyone, given me some stuff to consider next time I give it a go.

 

Next question is how this'll all interact with different paints. The example above was just a Vallejo metallic base with the chipping fluid and more Vallejo on top, but what if I were to introduce Tamiya, Gunze or even Alclad into the mix? I'm already aware of how badly Alclad can go wrong but what other combos should I avoid? 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...