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BMW 507 Cabrio 1957 - Elvis Presley's one - Based on a Revell old kit 1:24


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Is anti-aliasing off? 8 seconds seems about right for a Mars V1 from memory. This calibration is per resin as well by the way which is why I never change mine, I always use Elegoo ABS-like grey, yes the colour makes a difference too. Getting the last 3 cylinders is the important bit for your grille to print well. How are you cleaning, do you have a washer?

 

So how I work is to get my calibration dead on, never change resin, temp, levelling or anything else, then if my print fails I know it's because my support strategy is wrong. You need to eliminate as many variables as possible or you're just guessing!

 

Looking better though. The good news is once this is right, you don't really need to do it again if you don't change resins etc.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, nick said:

Is anti-aliasing off? 8 seconds seems about right for a Mars V1 from memory. This calibration is per resin as well by the way which is why I never change mine, I always use Elegoo ABS-like grey, yes the colour makes a difference too. Getting the last 3 cylinders is the important bit for your grille to print well. How are you cleaning, do you have a washer?

 

So how I work is to get my calibration dead on, never change resin, temp, levelling or anything else, then if my print fails I know it's because my support strategy is wrong. You need to eliminate as many variables as possible or you're just guessing!

 

Looking better though. The good news is once this is right, you don't really need to do it again if you don't change resins etc.

 

 

Yes, antialiasing was turned ON, I forgot to cancel it !

I clean in my Elegoo washer.

 

I'm currently finishing to print with 8 s AND antialias, I'll see if it is OK or not, and in this last case, I'll print WITHOUT antialiasing

Thanks so much again for your advices @nick

 

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By the way is your resin all shook up? you do need to have suspicious minds to figure out what's going wrong with 3D printing, I'm doing it everyday so It's always on my mind.  

 

I tried not to do that, I really did. But the temptation was just too great.

 

I'll get me coat.

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1 minute ago, nick said:

By the way is your resin all shook up? you do need to have suspicious minds to figure out what's going wrong with 3D printing, I'm doing it everyday so It's always on my mind.  

 

I tried not to do that, I really did. But the temptation was just too great.

 

I'll get me coat.

Yes it is shaken up.

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Now I'm over my Elvis thing, this was sprayed with Molotow yesterday, not fully hardened yet, but not super fragile by any means.

 

53038290485_2cbf957249_b.jpg

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7 minutes ago, nick said:

Now I'm over my Elvis thing, this was sprayed with Molotow yesterday, not fully hardened yet, but not super fragile by any means.

 

53038290485_2cbf957249_b.jpg

How much time do you wait for handling it without gloves and away from risking damaging it ?

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Just now, CrazyCrank said:

How much time do you wait for handling it without gloves and away from risking damaging it ?

ideally, I try and leave it for about week. I usually have it mounted on a cocktail stick and avoid touching as much as possible. It LOOKS LIKE it 'dries' very quickly which is the problem I think , it takes a long time to harden though, so it's tempting to think its OK before it is.

 

I only discovered this by forgetting about something and coming back to it much later and was surprised how tough it was. It's so shiny and nice it's so tempting to handle it too soon!

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Result with 8 s exposure time AND antialiasing 

 

53038320825_c646f54597_c.jpg

 

It's a bit more better for the holes and we now can see one cylinder more, but the 2 tinier are not present
I start a new print with 8s and WITHOUT antialiasing

 

 

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OK you may have just hit the physical limits of your printer then. How are you washing, it looks to me like the holes aren’t flushing clear of resin rather than a printing issue?

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1 minute ago, nick said:

OK you may have just hit the physical limits of your printer then. How are you washing, it looks to me like the holes aren’t flushing clear of resin rather than a printing issue?

I wash in my Elegoo washer, 10 minutes, and then I blow up all the remaining fluids with my airbrush, and I insist heavily over the more little holes, to remove rest resin, if there is, but even before curing, the last holes remain clogged !

 

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Try adjusting the resting time - the time between the platen reaching the build position, and the lights coming on. It could be there's not enough time for the resin to escape before the cure cycle starts.

When the platen reaches the build position it takes a little while longer for all that extra resin to move out of the way.

 

I had an issue recently where detail wasn't being reproduced as finely as I knew it could be. The problem was solved when I introduced a delay between when the build plate reached the build position and when the UV lights came on.

 

 

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2 hours ago, hendie said:

Try adjusting the resting time - the time between the platen reaching the build position, and the lights coming on. It could be there's not enough time for the resin to escape before the cure cycle starts.

When the platen reaches the build position it takes a little while longer for all that extra resin to move out of the way.

 

I had an issue recently where detail wasn't being reproduced as finely as I knew it could be. The problem was solved when I introduced a delay between when the build plate reached the build position and when the UV lights came on.

 

 

Thanks @hendie

 

`I'm not sure I could set this kind of parameter in Chitubox...

Do you mean the" light-off delay" or the "bottom light-off delay". (Both are set to zero at the moment)

Which value would you give its ?

 

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Yes, it's one of those.  Chitubox descriptions are quite confusing. I had to search through the help file to understand what each one does.

Basically when the platen reaches its lowest position, you want to deal the UV lamp turning on to allow excess resin to escape from under the plate.  I think I used a setting of 0.75 seconds. That worked for my application but you may need to adjust depending upon the build geometry

 

 

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3 hours ago, hendie said:

Yes, it's one of those.  Chitubox descriptions are quite confusing. I had to search through the help file to understand what each one does.

Basically when the platen reaches its lowest position, you want to deal the UV lamp turning on to allow excess resin to escape from under the plate.  I think I used a setting of 0.75 seconds. That worked for my application but you may need to adjust depending upon the build geometry

 

 

I've made my last calibration tests, with modified settings in Chitubox, using your tip of 0,75 sec for Light-Off delay.

I made tests without Antialiasing, taking in account @nick advice, with an exposure time of 7 seconds ans 8 seconds, and for that, I've used a different calibration piece, this one:

 

53039395694_ae596541b3_c.jpg

 

The best print allows to see 12 hollowed holes and 11 pins. It' been printed with an exposure time of 8 seconds without antialiasing, and with 0.75 sec bottom light-off delay:

 

53039601925_59db4fb22b_c.jpg   53039212316_c088b64596_c.jpg

 

53038630832_dbd7388e6b_c.jpg

 

I consider that my printer is now calibrated to the best of my ability

 

53039712578_cfd4ac62d0_c.jpg

 

Many thanks to @hendie  and @nick for their advices and patience :)

 

The newt step is to get a 8 or 12K Elegoo Saturn printer...I've to wait Santa Klaus :)

 

 

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1 hour ago, CrazyCrank said:

I've made my last calibration tests, with modified settings in Chitubox, using your tip of 0,75 sec for Light-Off delay.

I made tests without Antialiasing, taking in account @nick advice, with an exposure time of 7 seconds ans 8 seconds, and for that, I've used a different calibration piece, this one:

 

53039395694_ae596541b3_c.jpg

 

The best print allows to see 12 hollowed holes and 11 pins. It' been printed with an exposure time of 8 seconds without antialiasing, and with 0.75 sec bottom light-off delay:

 

53039601925_59db4fb22b_c.jpg   53039212316_c088b64596_c.jpg

 

53038630832_dbd7388e6b_c.jpg

 

I consider that my printer is now calibrated to the best of my ability

 

53039712578_cfd4ac62d0_c.jpg

 

Many thanks to @hendie  and @nick for their advices and patience :)

 

The newt step is to get a 8 or 12K Elegoo Saturn printer...I've to wait Santa Klaus :)

 

 

Looks pretty good now.
 

That’s one of the better calibration pieces, the main thing to look at when you’re tuning is the intersection of the cross over point of the infinity symbol bit, if it’s sharp, not undershooting or overlapping your settings are good. Yours looks fine from what I can see of it. 
 

the last bit to tune is Z axis (build plate zeroing) which is a minefield.
 

The best method I have found is the dry print one. So slice anything you like at 10 micron layer height, drain your printer, loosen the build plate clamp and print your dummy job with the Vat in place but no resin, pause it immediately on the first layer, apply slight pressure to your build plate and clamp it up tight. This should give you perfect adhesion with no elephant foot and accurate z height. You can prove this by drawing a 10mm cube and printing directly with no supports, then just measure it. If you do this before calibrating then again after, I bet the first cube will be about .3mm short in Z.
It’s a long story, but Z=0 probably doesn’t do what you think it does, plus the firmware does all kinds of ‘helpful’ things between zeroing your plate and printing. This method actually lets you set the height your first layer is physically printing at regardless of what the machine is trying to do under the covers. 

 

it’s not super critical on small printers like Mars, but really is on the bigger ones and has caused me endless problems that you wouldn’t believe due to this. 

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9 hours ago, nick said:

Looks pretty good now.
 

That’s one of the better calibration pieces, the main thing to look at when you’re tuning is the intersection of the cross over point of the infinity symbol bit, if it’s sharp, not undershooting or overlapping your settings are good. Yours looks fine from what I can see of it. 
 

the last bit to tune is Z axis (build plate zeroing) which is a minefield.
 

The best method I have found is the dry print one. So slice anything you like at 10 micron layer height, drain your printer, loosen the build plate clamp and print your dummy job with the Vat in place but no resin, pause it immediately on the first layer, apply slight pressure to your build plate and clamp it up tight. This should give you perfect adhesion with no elephant foot and accurate z height. You can prove this by drawing a 10mm cube and printing directly with no supports, then just measure it. If you do this before calibrating then again after, I bet the first cube will be about .3mm short in Z.
It’s a long story, but Z=0 probably doesn’t do what you think it does, plus the firmware does all kinds of ‘helpful’ things between zeroing your plate and printing. This method actually lets you set the height your first layer is physically printing at regardless of what the machine is trying to do under the covers. 

 

it’s not super critical on small printers like Mars, but really is on the bigger ones and has caused me endless problems that you wouldn’t believe due to this. 

 

Thanks @nick for this new advice.

I'll re-calibrate my Z-axis using your method, once my current print is finished.

 

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On 7/12/2023 at 12:23 AM, nick said:

Looks pretty good now.
 

That’s one of the better calibration pieces, the main thing to look at when you’re tuning is the intersection of the cross over point of the infinity symbol bit, if it’s sharp, not undershooting or overlapping your settings are good. Yours looks fine from what I can see of it. 
 

the last bit to tune is Z axis (build plate zeroing) which is a minefield.
 

The best method I have found is the dry print one. So slice anything you like at 10 micron layer height, drain your printer, loosen the build plate clamp and print your dummy job with the Vat in place but no resin, pause it immediately on the first layer, apply slight pressure to your build plate and clamp it up tight. This should give you perfect adhesion with no elephant foot and accurate z height. You can prove this by drawing a 10mm cube and printing directly with no supports, then just measure it. If you do this before calibrating then again after, I bet the first cube will be about .3mm short in Z.
It’s a long story, but Z=0 probably doesn’t do what you think it does, plus the firmware does all kinds of ‘helpful’ things between zeroing your plate and printing. This method actually lets you set the height your first layer is physically printing at regardless of what the machine is trying to do under the covers. 

 

it’s not super critical on small printers like Mars, but really is on the bigger ones and has caused me endless problems that you wouldn’t believe due to this. 

 

Hi @nick

 

I've printed in 0,05 mm layers the 10 mm edge test cube before calibrating the Z axis with your method, and I obtain after UV curing a 9.99 x 9.99 x 9.99 mm cube

So, I don't think I need to calibrate it :)

 

 

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2 hours ago, CrazyCrank said:

 

Hi @nick

 

I've printed in 0,05 mm layers the 10 mm edge test cube before calibrating the Z axis with your method, and I obtain after UV curing a 9.99 x 9.99 x 9.99 mm cube

So, I don't think I need to calibrate it :)

 

 

Excellent. No sounds like it’s perfect anyway then. 

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2 hours ago, nick said:

Excellent. No sounds like it’s perfect anyway then. 

Although, as it’s consistent like that you can very slightly tweak the scaling option to get it perfect!

 

Nick

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4 hours ago, Fnick said:

There's a new comer on the chrome paint market! Just saw this video 

 

 

 

 

No affiliation with proscale paints I hasten to add! Just posted this fyi.

 

Nick

An observation - the 2K certainly gives it shine, but I think the quality you want with chrome is reflection. So far, I've all the sealers I've seen reduce the reflection. Adding the 2K over it just makes everything thicker and out of scale to my eye. I prefer leaving it bare and handling carefully with gloves.

Even 2K on bodies sometimes gives the appearance of a cheap diecast. YMMV.

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1 hour ago, Lvp said:

An observation - the 2K certainly gives it shine, but I think the quality you want with chrome is reflection. So far, I've all the sealers I've seen reduce the reflection. Adding the 2K over it just makes everything thicker and out of scale to my eye. I prefer leaving it bare and handling carefully with gloves.

Even 2K on bodies sometimes gives the appearance of a cheap diecast. YMMV.

This new chrome is interesting, but the process to use it is very time and money consuming !

Moreover, I agree 100% with Lvp: this chrome has also dulled a bit with its sealer (which looks like the Aqua Gloss Clear), and the 2K clear doesn't add anything but thickness.

To be honest and loyal with this new brand, I'll say that their chrome deserve some tries with other clear coating products: why not Future Floor Gloss ("pledge" from Johnson ) and  Deluxe "Looks like glass" ?

 

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Morning everybody :)

 

I've tried Deluxe "Looks like glass" over Revell chrome, as well as Alclad Aqua Gloss clear, and the result is indisputable !

 

Comparison:

- Need to thin it: None with ALCALD Aqua Gloss, 20% water with Looks Like Glass

- Smell: almost none with ALCLAD Aqua Gloss, and a VERY STRONG AND UNPLEASANT AMMONIA smell with DELUXE Looks like Glass, even once thinned.

- Loose of shine: a few with Alclad Aqua Gloss Clear, but really much much  less with "Looks like glass" and really very very few.

- Drying time (full curing and hardening): 30 minutes for ALCLAD Aqua Gloss, 3 hours for Looks Like Glass

- Handling once cured: No alteration, even after rubbing, with both products.

 

Which one is the winner ?
It depends on your goal ! If you are looking for the best chrome shine, what is the case for my BMW 507: DELUSE Looks Like Glass is the winner. If you're lookin for a slightly worn home, you should use ALCLAD Aqua Gloss.

 

I haven't picture to show you the results of those tests, but I can show you the parts I've just chromed with REVELL Chrome spray:

 

53049792858_e1f95c65d6_c.jpg   53049688110_96f4a0a16b_c.jpg

 

The chrome have to dry at least 72 hours, and probably I'll wait 96 hours if not a complet week to try to handle them, in order to check if handling with gloves alter or not the chrome shine, and whether  a clear coating is essential or not.

 

I'm quite on the way to test Green Stuff World Chrome that I just received, so, stay tuned for next adventures :)

 

 

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Good afternoon guys :)

 

I've tested Greenstuff World Airbrush Chrome yesterday over some grill and other parts.

I first sprayed 2 layers of the gloss black base coat of " Gravity Colors Mac Lare  Chrome effect set", and let it dry 24 hours
And then I sprayed the Greenstuff chrome directly from the bottle (no thinner) at 15 psi as advised, with a low paint flow in several layers.

 

I got an IN-CRE-DI-BLE shine with this stuff, comparable to the one I obtained using REVELL chrome, BUT....
The final result seems better to me because the amount of paint sprayed with the airbrush is easy to control, so you get very thin layers of paint over the parts, while using a spray can, you can't control anything, and so, as predictable, the paint thickness is higher with REVELL Can.
So, I noticed that I got the best shine and accuracy with the airbrush.

 

53054986868_b75b44dd4d_b.jpg


A test I still haven't made is to spray the airbrush decanted REVELL Chrome, and to spray MOLOTOV Chrome, as suggested @nick...Will it be worth it ?

 

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