Jump to content

tamiya extra fine primer


masterKamera
 Share

Recommended Posts

ive had my first run in with the little bugger of a spray can. 

 

Yeah i did it on a somewhat humid day, 60-70% but i had no choice.  Slightly windy but i used the directions on the can rather well i thought. 

 

 

How thick am i supposed to spray it at one time? I know multiple coats.. however i was spraying onto red plastic cups and even some spots where i got it about a sheet of typing paper thick i can see "shadows" and slight red color from the ridges on the cup.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

tried it today on model,   not so good has issues i wasnt aware of. 

 

the can PULSES for some reason. And if i vary the angle of the can by even 1 degree from 90* to the ground, it goes from a mist to throwing out runny milk.  NOT fun to learn when your doing the side of a plane. 

 

Is it better to decant this crap into my airbrush, or just get the regular stuff in a bottle and airbrush with that?  Right now i need to figure out how to get it off a plane wing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first use of that primer was on my paint mule, 2 years ago. I used both the white and the grey. Both cans were a goodly number of years old, too. At least a dozen years since purchase. I shook both cans well. I also let the cans warm up out in the summer sun. You can also let the cans warm up in some hot water for a few minutes. This is always a good idea when using spray cans.

 

50163509358_cafb8be1b6_b.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When using a spray can a few pointers:

 

-shake shake shake until arm is sore then shake more. The shake a bit. If the can is behaving strangely, that's the most likely cause. Gunked up button also can cause issues, you could try swapping in another if you have one.

 

-try not to hold the button, apply in quick presses, while moving the spray across the piece. You dont ever really want it stationary. Really spray only for as long as it takes to say 'sh'. Cans apply lots of paint very quickly so the difficulty is almost always not applying too much. 

 

-for ridges and complicated shapes, just as with an airbrush, the angle to the piece you spray is very important. The shadows and colour under ridges for example sounds a lot like too much paint applied runny across the ridge, washing the paint behind the step.

 

- layering should generally not be needed but if you have to go over bits you missed, of course let the old layer dry. With lacquers like this, it shouldn't take more than a 10 minutes or so to be dry enough provided it was a nice thin layer.

 

-Generally I've found this stuff really good, the only difficulty is not spraying too much. You can decant to use in an airbrush but give it time for the propellant to evaporate. 

 

We all fall into the trap of blaming the tools or the kit. It's a difficult and frequently frustrating hobby, and difficulty using a new technique or product for the first time is to be expected. In the nicest way, getting angry about it is probably not a path to long term enjoyment!😀

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

this is the only can of it i have used, so i dont know if its a wonky can, wonky user, or wonky technique. 

 

But the only times i actually think i got a proper coat on the model was when i was holding der nozzle 12" away from the model, and just letting the outer mist region hit it. 

   could see right through it but those spots dried and i can feel the primer.

 

the top edge of the fuselage was a lopsided  beast, one side shaped like a pear in cross section and taller then the other side that was shaped like a pair.  SOME how... the fuselage shape is 'pear in cross section" on both sides... this stuff has a wierd texture when sanded. 

 

those big blobs ended up drying about 1/32" thick, i had to do a lot of scraping to restore details.. and over all its become a body filler and not a primer. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

watch?v=1K8rO4Ei610 

 

is the video i copied, as he did the same prcoess with tamiya spray can and air brush primer, and well he did as the can label says,, start the spray off of the item to paint, and then sweep it across and then kill the spray when you are off of the item

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The sprays are extra sensitive to the humidity and they tend to be really heavy. Your only control is doing it faster and trying to mist the model without making the paint go dry in the air. It is bit tricky.

 

Here is a tutorial I followed with Army Painter. They are pretty good as spray cans go.

 

https://www.thearmypainter.com/basic-painting/spray/using-colour-primers/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All this talk of blobs and pear shapes again sounds like too much paint. Here's an example using montana primers.

 

 

In your video, Paul is spraying a huge area without detail pretty thickly and you can see the effect on the small bits of detail. Smaller more complicated shapes require a much lighter touch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Primers need to go on wet or you will end up with a gritty finish, especially with right angles on a model, were you get bounce back. Cans are designed for large flat areas with little detail. When applied to modern kits with loads of complex moldings and detail problems occur.

Trouble with cans are the spray control, their on or off, you pull back from the model to limit flooding and the paint drys before contact, you get close and you flood the area.

Decant and use with a good airbrush with a large needle were you have more control, you can also thin out the paint which allows you to get into the tight areas first before the final covering coats

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I use Tamiya fine primers (light grey and white) on most of my models, so I've gone through a few cans of it now. I find, as others have said, the biggest challenge is not putting too much paint on the model, because it comes out of the can really fast, but otherwise I've always found it really easy to use and the end result has always been a good smooth finish to apply the colour coats to, without washing out all of the detail. I get the occasional run when I'm just not moving the can quickly enough, but it seems fairly resistant to that too. Personally, I think the most likely problem is you either got a duff can, or the conditions have really screwed the can up and I've just never happened across those conditions when spraying.

 

I doubt it's a technique problem, and my experience makes me doubt it's a general product problem, so I'd suggest you give it one more chance. Maybe with a can from a different source in case it was a bad batch or a fake or something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...