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Westland Wasp HAS 1: 'Ambuscade Flight: XT778'


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Very impressive start for 2024 Tony! I am also in big trouble printing the clear parts. Although the Blackbird and Oxcart clear parts are significantly smaller than Wasp I wasn't able to get clear parts printed nicely. I have used several clear 3d resin products without having an acceptable success.After printing the parts I soaked the parts in Future or clear epoxy resin, sprayed parts over with 2K clear coat, sanded the surfaces with 3k to 12k grit polishing papers, polished them with Tamiya polishing compounds. Each method has some pros and cons but none of them was perfect.

My next try will be to print a canopy with proper base for casting, polish it as much as possible, use it as silicone mold master and cast the clear parts with PU or epoxy clear resin. Unfortunately for my project vacuform seems not to be an option.

Serkan

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HNY Tony.  Brilliant stuff (as always).  I can only gaze in awe at the level of skills on display here.   

 

If you ever get around to doing a 1/24 Wessex, just make sure it's an HC2....    :D

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  • 3 weeks later...

Morning all <flexes knees>

I'm pleased to say that recent efforts have seen (barring the AS.12 installation) the exterior designs for the Wasp now completed.

 

Answerphone messages first though as usual:

On 13/01/2024 at 16:47, perdu said:

I like the idea of slotting the kick panel windows into a fixed location, I suppose then you might be able to add the fixing screws afterwards, the damned things are making me wake up with another yet approach to try next...

One of those parts that looks superficially easy until you get your hands on it isn't it Bill? There's a nice view of the panel in isolation here:

https://www.ebay.ie/itm/305368614587

As it's all a single and rather thin unit I've had to include the strip around the transparency in the vacform design so if the screws on it look naff, I'll file them of and reinstate manually.

 

Your miniature of it  looks excellent btw! :thumbsup:

On 13/01/2024 at 18:09, Serkan Sen said:

Although the Blackbird and Oxcart clear parts are significantly smaller than Wasp I wasn't able to get clear parts printed nicely. I have used several clear 3d resin products without having an acceptable success.After printing the parts I soaked the parts in Future or clear epoxy resin, sprayed parts over with 2K clear coat, sanded the surfaces with 3k to 12k grit polishing papers, polished them with Tamiya polishing compounds. Each method has some pros and cons but none of them was perfect.

In terms of the amount of effort required to achieve an acceptable appearance it's still a frustrating process isn't it Serkan? 3D printing is kind of 90% of the way there for transparencies at present but there remains that final gulf which it is incapable of bridging for the kind of work we do. 

 

On 13/01/2024 at 19:49, bigbadbadge said:

Crikey, I have missed seeing those fantastic renderings, great work as usual Tony, it sll looks superb .

Ta Chris. Things seemed to spend ages recently stuck at that frustrating point of finding lots of exterior details I'd overlooked/ignored until now but thankfully the items have been ticked off the list in recent weeks.

On 14/01/2024 at 07:25, giemme said:

Amazing ypdate, as usual

I like that typo Giorgio and may modify it as a 'yepdate' to indicate when reporting on something going well! :D

On 14/01/2024 at 07:59, keefr22 said:

that CAD artwork would look good on any wall

Sending the stencil to Banksy as we speak Keith....:D

On 14/01/2024 at 14:44, hendie said:

If you ever get around to doing a 1/24 Wessex, just make sure it's an HC2

:lol:

Help!

53504101093_5b709f4c59_m.jpg

 

Still the cockpit interiors and APX sight to do of course but what follows is a visual summary showing the final stages of detailing the exterior of the vehicle.

 

With the roof and nose areas done, the remaining areas to be filled in were the sides and undersides of the cabin section that sits between the engine deck and nose unit. In such cases it always makes sense to handle all the symmetrical details first on one side -  as I've done here with the starboard features - so that once done, they can be mirrored across to port for any asymmetric additions to be made:

53461032133_ba84088763_b.jpg

Tucked away on the mid section just forward of the jury beam on either side are the diminutive and slightly odd-shaped navigation lights:

53461294365_22df2ac3a8_b.jpg

In contrast to the large areas of transparency (where it didn't work), such small transparent details as these will be a good candidate for printing using AC's High Clear resin, due the small surface area requiring polishing up. With those small lights done, it was then on to the downward identification and larger landing light on the underside beneath the nose:

53461294355_ba8c18df47_b.jpg

Yes there are lightbulbs in there under the lenses - these should just print from AC HC at 1/24, though I'm less sure about 1/32 but will try anyway. In homage to the classic Airfix method of mounting undercarriage legs, I added a substantial mounting pivot for the landing light so it can swivel downward like the real thing:

53461294360_2d7b2dba23_b.jpg

Directly in front of the fairing for those lights sit these two rectangular transparent amber light-like fittings:

53459961757_5c12f194a7_b.jpg

As one of a series of such puzzles on this build, I had to scour the maintenance manuals in order cross-reference parts numbers from drawings to  - I think (though open to correction as always) - discover their purpose:

53453024208_69f370e89a_n.jpg

The honeycombed nature of these RADALT fairings should also lend themselves to reproduction with Anycubic's High Clear stuff.

 

A couple of rendered views to summarize progress at that point:

53460032082_7d4f0738d0_b.jpg

 

53461032138_ef6c8b74e2_b.jpg

There is quite a lot of detail on the central section of the underside that is not straightforward to discern due to the maintenance drawings being largely oblique views, and with the same issue overlaid by wide-angle lens distortions in photographic references. However, in being blessed with both @bootneck's and @Anthony in NZs source imagery for this region, I've managed to minimize inaccuracies of shape and disposition as far as possible from such material. 

 

As the torpedo/bomb carriers themselves provided a valuable central datum to begin work, I used their position to rough out as always a sketch map of the required topography:

53492975438_b8448424d0_c.jpg

In examining the various images I had of the torpedo release gear, many of them were close-ups without surrounding context to identify what side and angle they were taken from, whilst more distant contextual airframe shots didn't show enough detail (either due to distance or shadow) to act as confirmation. For a period then I was confused that I was looking at two different variants of the release gear as they looked so different. The PN's however were clear (without reference to any subsequent Mods) that in the case of both the Mk.44 & 46 torpedo layout, the EM/EF 100/1000 carrier was preferred method for upsetting submarines:

53458289512_10593b5e5f_h.jpg

Interestingly enough, the Weapon Stations loadout diagram preceding this makes it clear that aside from the capability to carry Mk.44s on both sides,  a sole Mk.46 was only carried to Stbd.

 

By cross-referencing source images I was able to confirm that the contradiction in features on closeups of this gear resulted purely from their being a different arrangement of details on either side of each carrier, a fact finally nailed down by locating identical ID plates on two different sets of images:

53473547101_31c0f8e8ef_b.jpg

The visual giveaway on more distant shots are the lighter features which stand out (once you understand the close-up details); the prominent silver cylindrical fuzing unit to the rear of the stbd side of the carrier, with the long rectangular ID plate on the port side indicating that aspect.

Stbd:

53483323647_77045db96b_b.jpg

Port:

53484532339_756f3ea229_b.jpg

It then occurred to me that the torpedoes themselves make for an additionally useful scale/position reference for surrounding features, so I spent a week down the torpedo rabbit hole as it were, firstly on the Mk.44:

53477897639_6343419fec_b.jpg

For print purposes this was divided into warhead/fuel-tank/afterbody/propellors (x2) and parachute bag sections.  A centering channel down the middle for brass rod helps everything align along the longitudinal axis during assembly, with a similar side channel to line the sections up laterally:

53476680067_ca4a0a3da9_b.jpg

 

53477897624_f94be88f6e_b.jpg

This process was then repeated for the Mk.46. Whilst their diameters are the same, the 46 is longer than the 44, with different propellor, parachute and guidance features, as well as different port/surface features:

53477897669_7b5822523f_b.jpg

At the rear, the prominent battery unit and fire control sockets are visually similar, and, as far as the RN/RNZN are concerned, the same Type-C suspension bands were used for both variants:

53477992950_e70206355e_b.jpg

Again on the Mk.46, the same kind of alignment channels are used for assembling the parts correctly. In terms of fixing the torpedo(es) to their carrier, the release hook of the real thing obviously wouldn't be strong enough in itself to suspend either torpedo body so in order to make mounting them in place as strong yet unobtrusive as possible, a brass pin is used to pierce both carrier and torpedo in a manner that should be largely invisible to the eye when assembled.

53483323657_1453af832b_b.jpg

The sway braces themselves will also be glued into place along the fuel tank for added strength.

53483323682_c9c26496b7_b.jpg

A Mk.44 and carrier combined:

53484532374_e77abb0341_b.jpg

 

53484372353_930dd128bf_b.jpg

 

53484372378_3f850a7ec1_b.jpg

Both variants compared:

53476680117_99039a758b_b.jpg

 

53477897689_f18748b9b5_b.jpg

 

53477582366_fcd3a866d2_b.jpg

With those prominent items as landmarks, I could then start filling in the various small fittings and fuzing units &etc. underneath the cabin:

53503019582_476b207806_b.jpg

 

53503019517_77b8b4b0d6_b.jpg

 

53504210459_c08fa5d9d0_b.jpg

I must confess to a considerable amount of eyestrain in having to redraft several of those features until they resembled more closely what photography revealed.

 

I call this feature a 'step' only because it resembles one but as it's only present to port, that can't be it's real function:

spacer.png

In the realms of wider speculation I briefly considered that this might be a parachute mounting for the diagonally-slung WE.177, but can't see that as the case:

spacer.png

Up front beside the landing light fairing is the 'coffee-can' shape of the I-band transponder, with the pitot inboard of it:

53503019527_964ddf2557_b.jpg

The front diagonal brace of that transponder seems to have an odd 'kink' in it:

53504052498_3f0f4c240e_b.jpg

I thought my images just showed the same damaged one but this seems present on multiple airframes. I wonder is that so that it follows the contour of the airframe when the transponder is in stowed position?

01.jpg

With carriers fitted:

53503019542_d5b98e0b38_b.jpg

 - and a Mk.44 along for the ride:

53504052518_e38709c6c3_b.jpg

 

53504052513_256248b24b_b.jpg

 

53503901331_c99a6dcff9_b.jpg

 

53504210494_ccca34be56_b.jpg

Renders to finish:

53503901356_1a25360695_b.jpg

 

53503019557_70a5b8e808_b.jpg

 

53504328225_0519d83a97_b.jpg

 

53503901341_f38a3a1332_b.jpg

I need to stop staring at rivets for a while. Am currently addicted to Le Bureau des légendes after getting withdrawl symptoms from Slow Horses....

 Hoping this finds you well,

:bye:

Tony

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by TheBaron
Apparently has the spelling ability of a five year old
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Superb update once again, Tony. And now we even have weapons.

This will certainly enhance the play value at bathtime and ensure that you can sell even more!

Rivet strain of the eyeballs. Sounds serious. I think gazing at one of your sunsets should prove relaxing. 

Take care and stay warm. Pete

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Awesome stuff. And a great shout-out to Eno and Byrne. I have a first edition CD of that record, including the song where the vocals are provided by Algerian Muslims chanting the Koran. I understand why that selection was removed from later editions, but it is a really cool tune nonetheless.

 

Cheers,

Bill

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Not much else to add.

More stunning CADery, plus a lesson in watery weapons.

 

The thread itself is enlightening. The CAD work even more so.

 

Have a great weekend Tony!

 

Ian

 

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Another awesome update. Those CAD drawings are a source of reference for other Wasp modellers in their own right. Fantastic stuff. Best detail I've yet seen on Mk 44 and Mk 46 Torpedoes too.

 

As for the pic of that wee Wasp carrying a WE-177. I do wonder whether the poor aircrew (probably just the pilot with all that other weight) really stood a chance if they had to "drop" one of those for real. Can hardly imagine a Wasp exiting the area fast¬†ūüėď

 

Terry

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Superb, simply superb.

 

1 hour ago, Terry1954 said:

As for the pic of that wee Wasp carrying a WE-177. I do wonder whether the poor aircrew (probably just the pilot with all that other weight) really stood a chance if they had to "drop" one of those for real. Can hardly imagine a Wasp exiting the area fast¬†ūüėď

 

Terry

 

I've often wondered about that.  When we flew with that 600lb bomb in the Lynx, thee was a very clear two man rule such that one person couldn't drop it.  There was a Bomb Release Safety Lock buried deep beside the outside of the pilot's seat which I couldn't reach, and main weapon release on the lower left hand side of the radar which the Pilot couldn't reach.  Both had to be activated to release the weapon.  Yet I am sure that talking to some of the Wasp pilots on 829 Sqn when we were dual Lynx/Wasp, they always used to say that carrying the bomb resulted in about 8 minutes endurance with no Aircrewman. 

 

However, I don't quite get how those numbers stack up.  The Wasp was ~1566 kg unladen and 2495 Max All Up Mass.  The weapon was 272 kg.  So aircraft + bomb + Pilot (average weight for A/C weight calculations is 93 kg per aircrew including flying kit) is 1931 kg, leaving 564 kg for the Aircrewman, fuel and anything else they may have added on.  Now I've not been able to work out how much fuel a Wasp could carry nor what its fuel flow rate was, but it cruised at 90 kts and had a range of ~260 nm which equates to about 2 hrs 50 min.  A Lynx carried 802 kg of fuel when pressure refuelled of which 702 was usable in normal operations, and burned fuel at anything from 250 to 275 kg per hour depending upon a variety of factors.  If one assumes that the Nimbus engine in the Wasp burned fuel at roughly the same rate as a Gem in the Lynx, that would give ~125 kg per hr which multiplied by 2 hr 50 min would equate to roughly 360 kgs fuel so say 460 kg with a 100 kg reserve.  That means that by my calculations, a Wasp ought to be able to carry a 600 lb bomb, two crew and still have enough capacity for full fuel.

 

I must chat to one of my former Flight Commanders who flew Wasp before he transferred Lynx and see what his thoughts are. 

 

However, still not a job I would have fancied, even in a Lynx with our 150 kt getaway speed.  I was profoundly glad when that weapon was taken out of service :) .

 

 

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2 hours ago, Chewbacca said:

I've often wondered about that.  When we flew with that 600lb bomb in the Lynx, thee was a very clear two man rule such that one person couldn't drop it.  There was a Bomb Release Safety Lock buried deep beside the outside of the pilot's seat which I couldn't reach, and main weapon release on the lower left hand side of the radar which the Pilot couldn't reach.  Both had to be activated to release the weapon.  Yet I am sure that talking to some of the Wasp pilots on 829 Sqn when we were dual Lynx/Wasp, they always used to say that carrying the bomb resulted in about 8 minutes endurance with no Aircrewman. 

 

However, I don't quite get how those numbers stack up.  The Wasp was ~1566 kg unladen and 2495 Max All Up Mass.  The weapon was 272 kg.  So aircraft + bomb + Pilot (average weight for A/C weight calculations is 93 kg per aircrew including flying kit) is 1931 kg, leaving 564 kg for the Aircrewman, fuel and anything else they may have added on.  Now I've not been able to work out how much fuel a Wasp could carry nor what its fuel flow rate was, but it cruised at 90 kts and had a range of ~260 nm which equates to about 2 hrs 50 min.  A Lynx carried 802 kg of fuel when pressure refuelled of which 702 was usable in normal operations, and burned fuel at anything from 250 to 275 kg per hour depending upon a variety of factors.  If one assumes that the Nimbus engine in the Wasp burned fuel at roughly the same rate as a Gem in the Lynx, that would give ~125 kg per hr which multiplied by 2 hr 50 min would equate to roughly 360 kgs fuel so say 460 kg with a 100 kg reserve.  That means that by my calculations, a Wasp ought to be able to carry a 600 lb bomb, two crew and still have enough capacity for full fuel.

 

I must chat to one of my former Flight Commanders who flew Wasp before he transferred Lynx and see what his thoughts are. 

 

However, still not a job I would have fancied, even in a Lynx with our 150 kt getaway speed.  I was profoundly glad when that weapon was taken out of service :)

 

Sobering reading Ralph. Much respect to you and your colleagues for the job you all did back in the day.

 

T.

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