Jump to content

Using 3D printing resin as a filler


Recommended Posts

All, I have been experimenting with using 3D printing resin as a filler on my models recently. For those who don't know, resin 3D printing uses an LCD screen and Ultra Violet (UV) cure resin to make successive layers on a print.

 

The resin I have been using is Elegoo's ABS like resin, the grey one. when fully cured it is a hard, tough material, but it takes about a day to get t that hardness. However it can be spot cured using a UV LED torch, much the same as the commercially available UV cure clear adhesives. What makes it good for flling is that the spot cure will in seconds cure it to a hard gel like consistency, without discernable shrinkage, and the majority of the excess can be easily removed with a scalpel blade or scraper while still reasonably soft. while I would not recommend it for large areas, for deepish gaps it is great because it flows in, then you can wipe the surface with tissue to remove excess, cure and repeat as necessary.

 

Once fully cured it can be sanded relatively easily, especially compared to Cyano. It seems to be able to take scribing, and paints just fine. 

 

The biggest advantage with it seems to be that you can get it where you want, remove the excess (it is soluble in alcohol) and only cure it once you are happy where it is, so you save on sanding and clean up. If you get it wrong just use alcohol to completely remove it. It doesn't seem to fog canopies, and sticks well to all the plastic I used in my trials. Also, at 16 quid for a half litre, you will never run out

 

It is not without disadvantages of course, and high on that list is that it is an irritant, so you have to take care using it and wear surgical gloves. It also can only be used where you can get the light to it, so really deep gaps are not recommened for this technique. I don't think it will replace all my other filling techniques, but as a complementary product it is hard not to recommend.

 

Anyway, I thought I would share my experience with you all

 

Les

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice idea but a word of caution (and I am not referring to the hazzards because of the material) - as you say the gaps must not be too deep as other wise the resin will not cure. So you will have to build up layers to avoid uncured resin. I use Elegoo water soluble resin and it has the nasty habit that as long as it is not cured it eats away paint and also dissolves cured resin in as much as this crumbles away.

The story behind my discovery: I found out the hard way when one of my first printed resin models (Imperial probe droid - which I even happed to get finished) suddenly started to wet itself 😞 The parts were printed hollow and there was a closed cavity which I did not notice before it was too late. The enclosed uncured resin broke loose after several weeks and now I have to restore half of the parts and the base :angrysoapbox.sml:

But I will try your idea on some scap kits for testing :-)

Thanks for sharing :thumbsup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
On 5/3/2022 at 9:18 AM, lesthegringo said:

All, I have been experimenting with using 3D printing resin as a filler on my models recently. For those who don't know, resin 3D printing uses an LCD screen and Ultra Violet (UV) cure resin to make successive layers on a print.

 

The resin I have been using is Elegoo's ABS like resin, the grey one. when fully cured it is a hard, tough material, but it takes about a day to get t that hardness. However it can be spot cured using a UV LED torch, much the same as the commercially available UV cure clear adhesives. What makes it good for flling is that the spot cure will in seconds cure it to a hard gel like consistency, without discernable shrinkage, and the majority of the excess can be easily removed with a scalpel blade or scraper while still reasonably soft. while I would not recommend it for large areas, for deepish gaps it is great because it flows in, then you can wipe the surface with tissue to remove excess, cure and repeat as necessary.

 

Once fully cured it can be sanded relatively easily, especially compared to Cyano. It seems to be able to take scribing, and paints just fine. 

 

The biggest advantage with it seems to be that you can get it where you want, remove the excess (it is soluble in alcohol) and only cure it once you are happy where it is, so you save on sanding and clean up. If you get it wrong just use alcohol to completely remove it. It doesn't seem to fog canopies, and sticks well to all the plastic I used in my trials. Also, at 16 quid for a half litre, you will never run out

 

It is not without disadvantages of course, and high on that list is that it is an irritant, so you have to take care using it and wear surgical gloves. It also can only be used where you can get the light to it, so really deep gaps are not recommened for this technique. I don't think it will replace all my other filling techniques, but as a complementary product it is hard not to recommend.

 

Anyway, I thought I would share my experience with you all

 

Les

You need to be wearing a mask with good filters too. It's also a lung irritant and the fumes will get to you.

 

As an emergency stop gap it has potential but as a long term tool you're better off using one of the fast drying putties like vallejo's plastic putty. Much safer and you don't have to deal with sanding down resin and all the hassle that requires to do safely. UV resins for creating lens or gems is different though. Getting colours without having to mix up small amounts of 2 part resins is their best usage IMO. You're not going to be sanding or cutting it and you can leave it to cure under the uv light for a while. Once the resins gone hard, it still needs a bit more curing or you risk deeper resin being uncured and causing a crack.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...