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Flying Start Models 1:32 Slingsby T.31B - RAF Air Cadets


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With apologies for lack of updates - my attention has been elsewhere - but now back on this delightful kit!

 

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Cockpit sills on this scheme are black - so these areas have been carefully masked and sprayed.

 

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The wing strut between the front and rear cockpits has had two 0.6mm holes drilled through, prepped and sprayed matt black. Here dry fitted in situ:

 

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I love the way the vac transparencies have been done - as combining front and rear sections means you can take a two-stage approach, and make everything a little simpler!

 

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You get two sets in the kit, so you have backups should things go awry.

 

One of the two sets has been cut out - by gently running a fresh scalpel blade alone the 'creases' in the moulding.

 

Keeping the front and rear together at this stage makes it a lot easier to sand the lower edges true - as you have more to hold - and the parts are stiffer together.

 

In other news, I hear that Tim has some young Air Cadet figures to go with the project!

 

Hopefully some more progress this evening...

 

Iain

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  • 4 weeks later...

Feeling a little guilty as I've been putting off something that I was worried could go horribly wrong...

 

The airframe I'm modelling has DayGlo/Scotchcal sections on the outer wings - complicated by the fact that they follow the radius of the roundels at the inner ends.

 

Main issue was that I'd already applied the decals for the roundels - so didn't want to damage those when removing masking.

 

Solution I came up with was thin paper masks the same diameter as the roundels, cut with a compass cutter, and held in place with a thin strip of Tamiya tape across the middle - parallel to the leading edge.

 

Next I cut circular masks in 'Oramask' masking film, again with the Compass Cutter, and with a radius around 1.5mm larger.

 

These were then applied over the top - using the holes in the centres of both paper and Oramask circles to align.

 

After that, the rest of the areas could be masked up safely using Tamiya tape.

 

These areas were given a very light coat of MRP Luminous Orange (MRP-194) along the edges of the tape, at low pressure, followed by a coat of MRP White to provide a solid background, followed by a final coat of MRP Luminous Orange.

 

Results are shown in the photos - and I'm happy with the results - after a little nail-biting! 

 

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Letting these areas harden off - then the main airframe parts will get a light coat of satin varnish.

 

Iain

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On 22/03/2022 at 11:14, T-21 said:

Paul, The Sedbergh was known as the "Barge" due to its nose profile. The T-31 or Cadet Mk.3 as the "Brick" due to its high sink rate.

That reminds me. During an evening one summer while atTangmere for an air experience in gliding, a chap was doing his advance training and was attempting a spot landing as close to the launch point as possible

 But his mistake was opening the spoilers too soon and a bit too high and dropped....

Like a brick hitting the ground with a loud crack. I watched all this happen with the wings dropping down wards and fuselage buckling. Needless to say all gliding was suspended after that

 We were then delayed to assist in the remaining dismantling of the glider and carting it off too the hangar.  The glider in question was XN250..

The very one I soloed in a couple years later.

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The Mk III spoilers were meant to be closed below 50ft - it wasn't known as the Mk III Brick without reason.  The reason given to me during my training as a winch operator, a mear 43 years ago,  for the Day-Glo leading edges was so that the winch operator could see it was a Mk III and not a Sedburgh, as the speed of the winch was different for both types. There were no radios in those days and all operations were line of sight and controlled by light signals.

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Thanks for the background details - I hadn't known that reason for the DayGlo strips - makes perfect sense!

 

Now - starter for 10...

 

I presume that if a young, slim, 16 year old cadet were on their first solo - the ballast weight on the tailplane wouldn't be needed?

 

Iain

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1 hour ago, Iain Ogilvie said:

Thanks for the background details - I hadn't known that reason for the DayGlo strips - makes perfect sense!

 

Now - starter for 10...

 

I presume that if a young, slim, 16 year old cadet were on their first solo - the ballast weight on the tailplane wouldn't be needed?

 

Iain

Checking the files, I find two slightly different weights requiring the ballast weight, so...... If flying solo, which had to be done from the front cockpit, if the pilot's weight EXCEEDED either 149 or 203 Lbs, depending on which regs you were using, then the ballast weight had to be locked into the channel in the middle of the top of the tailplane. If the solo pilot weighted LESS than those numbers, or the aircraft was being flown two-up, then no ballast weight required... Hope that makes sense!

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More progress!

 

0.5mm brass wire cut and bent for the wing mounts - this material is supplied in the kit.

 

Here loosely fitted in place and not glued:

 

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Tailplane bonded in place - and support struts cut to length from the 0.5mm brass rod, painted red and fitted:

 

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Nose and under-fuselage cable connections painted and fitted, along with the main wheel and skid. Skid suitably weathered to depict a worn wooded surface under the paint:

 

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All out!

 

Iain

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And an overview of where we are now - ready for a coat of satin varnish - and some more detail work.

 

It's a pity the camera doesn't really pick up on the DayGlo effect - looks great with the rest of the scheme:

 

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And gratuitous 'dry' assembly:

 

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This kit has been an absolute delight to build so far - great fun, something different, and hugely rewarding!

 

I believe Tim *may* soon have some cadet figures to go with this kit...

 

Iain

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, wing and struts attached so she was complete enough to display at the Avon Model Show in Thornbury yesterday.

 

Still needs rigging and strut stays fitting - but hopefully gave an idea of the quality of this kit out of the box!!

 

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Final surface finish is a thin coat of Gunze Aqueous Satin Clear that was burnished slightly after drying for a few days - and gives a nice representation of the sheen, rather than full gloss, of the originals.

 

Iain

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And a few, more detailed, images...

 

General underside view - weathering still a 'work in progress'...

 

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'Landing Gear'...

 

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Tail skid in place - printed using a more resilient resin:

 

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Tail ballast weight (included in kt):

 

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Not often (if at all?) you get an opportunity to build a model in RAF Air Cadets markings:

 

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Hopefully I'll get the rigging sorted at the weekend and post some RFI images.

 

I've thoroughly enjoyed this project - the kit is just beautifully done and is a joy to put together and paint, but it's also a really good change of pace in terms of subject matter, and methods of building.

 

A really good MoJo restorer!!

 

If you want one I suggest you get in touch with Tim at Flying Start Models as numbers are limited and it won't be around forever.

 

All Out!

 

Iain

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