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Russian Naval Museum in St. Petersburg


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Hello, friends!

 

I live in St. Petersburg (Russia), there is a large Naval Museum of the Russian Navy in my city.

 

https://eng.navalmuseum.ru/

 

In this museum there are a large number of models of ships from ancient sailing ships to modern ones. If any of you are interested in a particular ship, I could take detailed photos of the model.

 

Dmitriy

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Hi Dmitriy, that's very kind of you to offer. I aim to build the cruiser Varyag (1899) in the not too distant future, so if there is a model of that ship at the museum then I would definitely be interested in seeing some photographs of it. 

 

Regards,

Ross.

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Varyag is definitely there.

Below is a photo from the Internet from the museum hall.

Are you interested in specific details or everything? I won't be able to go to the museum for at least a week.

 

 

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35 minutes ago, Dmitriy1967 said:

 

Varyag is definitely there.

Below is a photo from the Internet from the museum hall.

Are you interested in specific details or everything? I won't be able to go to the museum for at least a week.

 

 

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A handful of pictures showing different areas of the hull, deck and superstructure would be most appreciated. It will be my first imperial Russian navy subject so I'm unsure of any specific details to request.

 

Большое спасибо,

Ross.

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Oh my, 700,000 objects - I guess it's out of the question to photo them all then..! Any chance they have some of any of the Kirov/Adm Ushakov or Typhoon/Akula (the SSBN 941, not the SSN) classes? If you can find the Kolchida/Tamara, I'd be eternally grateful and more than happy to return the favour of anything that catches the eye in the National Maritime Museum.

 

David

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On 14/01/2022 at 21:03, Ravens said:

A handful of pictures showing different areas of the hull, deck and superstructure would be most appreciated. It will be my first imperial Russian navy subject so I'm unsure of any specific details to request.

 

Большое спасибо,

Ross.

Today I visited the museum. Now I will post photos of the Varyag

 

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And so... Cruiser of the 1st rank Varyag.

 

This model was made in the model workshop of the William Cramp and Sons shipyard in 1898. At the very shipyard where the Varyag cruiser was built.

Obviously, this is the most accurate model of this ship in the whole world.

 

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On 15/01/2022 at 04:18, Adm Lord De Univers said:

Oh my, 700,000 objects - I guess it's out of the question to photo them all then..! Any chance they have some of any of the Kirov/Adm Ushakov or Typhoon/Akula (the SSBN 941, not the SSN) classes? If you can find the Kolchida/Tamara, I'd be eternally grateful and more than happy to return the favour of anything that catches the eye in the National Maritime Museum.

 

David

 

I am very sorry that I saw your message just now. The next time I go to the museum (I do not know when it will be) I'll try to see if there are any of these ships.

There are halls with modern ships and ships from the cold War. This time I photographed the heavy aircraft carrier Kiev. And the anti-submarine helicopter carrier Moscow.

 

I liked the combat support group of the aircraft carrier Kiev.

 

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24 minutes ago, Dmitriy1967 said:

Excuse me for the quality of the images. It is difficult to photograph through glass. It takes a long time to catch the angle without glare and reflections.

These are great pictures Dmitriy, and so many of them. They will be my go-to reference material when I begin the Zvezda kit, thank you so much for taking the time to do that for me, I appreciate it greatly. 

 

I also noticed that the model in the museum has a red lower hull, whereas many ship modellers tend to paint it green. I'll have to research the historically accurate paint schemes - perhaps they changed over the years and there are several valid ways to paint the Varyag.

 

Once again, Большое спасибо, and if I'm ever in a position to return the favour then I'll let you know.

 

Many thanks,

Ross.

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39 minutes ago, Ravens said:

I also noticed that the model in the museum has a red lower hull, whereas many ship modellers tend to paint it green. I'll have to research the historically accurate paint schemes - perhaps they changed over the years and there are several valid ways to paint the Varyag.

 

I'm not an expert on painting ships of that era. But I noticed that in the halls of the museum of this period, almost all the ships from below are red. And there are models, old, some about 100 years old.

But... everything can be.

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1 hour ago, Ravens said:

I also noticed that the model in the museum has a red lower hull, whereas many ship modellers tend to paint it green. I'll have to research the historically accurate paint schemes - perhaps they changed over the years and there are several valid ways to paint the Varyag.

 

V.I.Kataev Cruiser "Varyag"
Coloring
During the service, the "Varyag" was painted as follows. Before leaving for Russia and in Russia from September 1900 to May 1901: the hull and masts are white; the lower knees of the chimneys and fans (pipes and funnels) are yellow; the upper knees of the chimneys, the masts of both masts and yards are black; the underwater part is green and the inner surface of the funnels is red.
During the voyage as part of the escort of Emperor Nicholas II from August to September 1901: the hull and masts - white; the knees of the chimneys and fans (pipes and funnels) are yellow; the crowns of the chimneys are 1.5 m wide, the masts of both masts and yards are black; the inner surface of the funnels is red; the underwater part is red.
During the transition to the Far East and in Port Arthur from August 1901 to September 1903: the hull and masts are white; the lower knees of the chimneys and fans (pipes and funnels) are yellow; the upper knees of the chimneys, the masts of both masts and yards are black; the inner surface of the funnels is red; the underwater part is red.
From September 1903 to the moment of death: from the hood to the waterline — olive color (in accordance with the order to paint ships in combat color, a 0.9 m wide strip of orange color was to be beaten off on the chimneys); the underwater part — red.
During the repair in Vladivostok and the passage to Hong Kong from March to July 1916: from the hood to the waterline — spherical color; the crowns of the chimneys 1m wide - black; the underwater part - most likely red.
During the transition from Hong Kong to Greenock from July to November 1916: from the hood to the waterline - "semi-white" color (so in the document — Auth.); crowns of chimneys 1m wide - black; underwater part - red.
During the transition from Greenock to the capture by the British from November 1916 to November 1917: from the hood to the waterline — ball color; crowns of chimneys 1m wide - black; underwater part - red.

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8 hours ago, Dmitriy1967 said:

 

V.I.Kataev Cruiser "Varyag"
Coloring
During the service, the "Varyag" was painted as follows. Before leaving for Russia and in Russia from September 1900 to May 1901: the hull and masts are white; the lower knees of the chimneys and fans (pipes and funnels) are yellow; the upper knees of the chimneys, the masts of both masts and yards are black; the underwater part is green and the inner surface of the funnels is red.
During the voyage as part of the escort of Emperor Nicholas II from August to September 1901: the hull and masts - white; the knees of the chimneys and fans (pipes and funnels) are yellow; the crowns of the chimneys are 1.5 m wide, the masts of both masts and yards are black; the inner surface of the funnels is red; the underwater part is red.
During the transition to the Far East and in Port Arthur from August 1901 to September 1903: the hull and masts are white; the lower knees of the chimneys and fans (pipes and funnels) are yellow; the upper knees of the chimneys, the masts of both masts and yards are black; the inner surface of the funnels is red; the underwater part is red.
From September 1903 to the moment of death: from the hood to the waterline — olive color (in accordance with the order to paint ships in combat color, a 0.9 m wide strip of orange color was to be beaten off on the chimneys); the underwater part — red.
During the repair in Vladivostok and the passage to Hong Kong from March to July 1916: from the hood to the waterline — spherical color; the crowns of the chimneys 1m wide - black; the underwater part - most likely red.
During the transition from Hong Kong to Greenock from July to November 1916: from the hood to the waterline - "semi-white" color (so in the document — Auth.); crowns of chimneys 1m wide - black; underwater part - red.
During the transition from Greenock to the capture by the British from November 1916 to November 1917: from the hood to the waterline — ball color; crowns of chimneys 1m wide - black; underwater part - red.

That's very useful, thanks once again. It seems that both red and green are valid choices. I'll definitely choose the green lower hull, as along with the white upper works it will really make the Varyag stand out among other models on the shelf. 

 

Thanks,

Ross.

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Dmitry, can I just echo the words of others and say thanks for taking the time to upload these, I'd love to visit Russia one day so the museum has just gone on the list of things to visit if in that area,

 

Curious that the modern ships are all green below the waterline, I'll have to remember that when I come to my Udaloy kit, 

 

Sam

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Hi Dmitriy,

 

The Varyag photographs you have posted are amazing - thank you very much indeed!! 

 

Whenever you do find the time to visit again, could I ask if you would mind trying to get a few of any Gangut Class Battleships?  I am interested in the Sevastopol.  I feel cheeky asking but would be grateful for any images - the models are superb quality and really appeal as a source of information, and inspiration!

 

Wilson

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Friends, I am always happy to help colleagues in my hobby.

 

Write here what ships you are interested in. The list will be collected, I will find a free day and go again.
I hope there is enough memory in my phone for all the photos. :)


By the way, on the museum's website, which I gave at the beginning, you can find photos of all the exhibits displayed in the halls. But, of course, not very detailed.

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I'll post some more photos that I took yesterday. These are the heavy aircraft carrier Kiev and the anti-submarine cruiser helicopter carrier Moscow. The museum has 2 models of Kiev and 2 models of Moscow. Unfortunately, the models of modern ships are no longer works of high art, like the old models. But they will help you in creating your own models.

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Hello Dmitriy,

 

Thank you for posting such interesting photos.  I am looking forward to seeing more of your photos of the Kiev and Moscow, they are two of my favourite maritime subjects.  I hope scratchbuild them in 1:350 scale, if I can get enough details and measurements etc.

 

Cheers,
Mike

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And so... Heavy aircraft carrier KIEV

 

Model 1.

I did not like the finish of the model, painting. The deck can't shine like glass.

 

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