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Newbie question - How do I release air from tank?


keiron99
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I've been using a handheld, self-contained rechargeable airbrush until now. 

 

I've just treated myself to a compressor with a tank (Fengda FD 186). However, when I remove the airbrush, by screwing off the hose (from either the tank or the airbrush), the air in the tank just comes spewing out, blowing stuff across my workbench.

 

That doesn't seem right to me, or is it?

 

I was also thinking of getting a "quick release" connector. Would one of them stop that happening (as well as making connection and disconnection easier - the thread seems like it could easily be stripped).

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I don’t have a tank on my compressor, but I would suggest turning off the compressor first and then releasing excess pressure through the airbrush?

 

Quick release will work to hold the pressure.  I got some in some airbrush spares but didn’t imagine it would be worth it with one brush.  But it is easier to just pop off the brush than unwind it.

 

hope this helps

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I don't know this make but I think there should be a valve to release unwanted air pressure. Looking at an image on amazon it may be under the transparent bottle thingy.

 

There's lots of answers in the q&a section which may help. Here:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Airbrush-Fengda-FD-186K-compressor-accessories/dp/B01984G4SU/ref=sr_1_1?adgrpid=1294125501959071&hvadid=80882920244908&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=133673&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvtargid=kwd-80883024880903%3Aloc-188&keywords=fengda+fd-186&qid=1641931668&sr=8-1

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Get a quick release and that problem will go away. If you buy some generic ones get 2 or 3. Sometimes you have bad luck and they leak like crazy. The only "pretty way" of emptying the tank is to keep the trigger pressed until the tank is depleted.

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As @bmwh548 noted, a quick-release connector will allow you to disconnect the airbrush from the compressor without emptying the tank in the process.

 

Here's a photo of my rig. I use the connectors to support 2 airbrushes.

iwata-hanger.jpg

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Thanks everyone. I'll get a quick release connector. I notice that some connectors have an "adjustment control valve" built into them. What are they exactly? Is it instead of having to use the pressure gauge on the compressor itself?

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10 hours ago, keiron99 said:

Thanks everyone. I'll get a quick release connector. I notice that some connectors have an "adjustment control valve" built into them. What are they exactly? Is it instead of having to use the pressure gauge on the compressor itself?

The MAC valve is so that you fine tune the pressure adjustment whilst working without touching the main regulator at the compressor.

They are either as you mentioned on the quick release or like mine on the airbrush itself.

So they are in addition to rather than in place of the main compressor regulator.

 

Also don't forget to drain the tank of moisture after use via the drain plug underneath the tank.

If you don't it can lead to corrosion and also rusty moisture getting into the air flow

Edited by Tijuana Taxi
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My fengda compressor has a release valve, it's that red thing with a key ring on it, just pull on it and it will release all air in the tank. It can be a bit tricky to pull.

 

Getting a quick release connector for the brush will just make your life a lot easier and they only cost a few quid from Amazon or eBay.

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On 1/14/2022 at 1:08 PM, sardaukar said:

My fengda compressor has a release valve, it's that red thing with a key ring on it, just pull on it and it will release all air in the tank. It can be a bit tricky to pull.

 

Getting a quick release connector for the brush will just make your life a lot easier and they only cost a few quid from Amazon or eBay.

You're telling me it's hard to pull! Access is restricted by the foot of the compressor (which, on my model, attaches to the tank).

 

Anyways, I ordered one of those quick release valve with the "MAC" valve on it, which seems like a fiver well spent.

 

 

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I looked for a manual, the one I found was a bit sparse to say the least. 

 

Is this the same on your compressor? 

spacer.png

If so it looks like the pressure relief valve, a gentle pull should release the air.

 

Also the may be a push button underneath the transparent cylinder by the pressure gauge which when pushed will empty the moisture trap.

 

I don't know if this is general, but mine says release the pressure at the end of the session,

Edited by Broadway
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Yep that is it, it takes a lot more than a gentle pull, my finger is a bit too big to get a good group on it. could probably add a handle to it using the key ring to make it easier.

 

I keep forgetting to let the air out after, not sure what that will do to the longterm life of the compressor.

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Yes, that model pictured is like mine. It's really difficult to get a hold of and quite stiff.

 

I believe the "drain valve" or whatever it's called underneath the tanks should also be released occasionally to let out moisture trapped in there.

 

To be fair, it seems like a reasonable bit of kit for £78.

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35 minutes ago, keiron99 said:

I believe the "drain valve" or whatever it's called underneath the tanks should also be released occasionally to let out moisture trapped in there.

Yes it should to reduce water corrosion damage to the tank.

 

To prevent water from being sprayed, you need an air separator, which is hopefully already on the tank or in your air line. If not, that would be a very good addition. I live in relatively dry Southern California, and I still make sure to empty the air separator after every session.

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I don't have a tank but when I finish up there is some air still in the compressor. I usually hit the release at the bottom of the water trap as that allows the air to bleed out while dumping a good bit of the water in the trap. 

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You should have an on/off tap between the tank and the airbrush. If not already installed on the compressor, it would be easy enough to fit one. That way you save the air in the tank for your next session with the airbrush.

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Thanks everyone. Really annoyed this morning. Got up early to do some spraying, and the hose blew apart from the connector.

 

The hose is one that came with the £22 Timbertech airbrush I bought with the compressor. The connector is basically just pushed on and crimped. Damnit!

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Phil Flory has done a series of bite size on airbrush,paint and compressors. You might have to pay to view them on his web site

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7 hours ago, keiron99 said:

Thanks everyone. Really annoyed this morning. Got up early to do some spraying, and the hose blew apart from the connector.

 

The hose is one that came with the £22 Timbertech airbrush I bought with the compressor. The connector is basically just pushed on and crimped. Damnit!

 

A decemt hose costs about 10 or 15 quid, so not surprised it wasn't great with an airbrush too for £22.

Don't imagine the tool itself will be that clever either, 1* reviews on Amazon are probably quite accurate.

Be careful when cleaning it, you could easily damage the threads and seals.

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