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1/48 - Avro Anson Mk.I by Airfix - released


Homebee

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Anson was ubiquitous to so many air forces. This kit appears to be another brilliant product by Airfix.  I am creating a presentation of 1/48 Hellenic Air Force types, during the 1940-1941 period. I will certainly be adding the beautiful Anson to that collection.

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From the parts video it seems that the kit will allow options not needed for the A/C modelled, with or without turret, with or without cowling blisters and 2 types of front canopy screen. The Aftermarket transfer people will love it! 

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  • Homebee changed the title to 1/48 - Avro Anson Mk.I by Airfix - released

My pre-order with Airfix was delivered at 1800 this evening , looks good and I do like the idea of the Pilot's Notes being provided as a decal for the Navigator's table.

 

By coincidence the November issue of Scale Aircraft Modelling which is hitting the shelves around now in the UK has a lengthy 'Aircraft In Profile' article on the Anson with a good selection of colour profiles with alternative colour schemes.

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Regarding the smooth winged Ansons in Canada I believe they were built in Canada where there is plentiful supply of timber so due to the wings being ply covered giving the smooth finish.

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57 minutes ago, Paul J said:

 

Regarding the smooth winged Ansons in Canada I believe they were built in Canada where there is plentiful supply of timber so due to the wings being ply covered giving the smooth finish.

 

The wings of Ansons built at Newton Heath (Manchester) were also wooden covered. The wing construction was essentially that of the Fokker Trimotor which Avro had produced under licence, so the factory had all the tooling and expertise. There is some thought that the initial design meeting for the Model 652 went along the lines of "what if we move the (Fokker) wing from the top to the bottom of the (Fokker) fuselage?" 

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10 hours ago, 224 Peter said:

The kit is here... first impressions are positive, good instructions, no short shots, very fine details... canopy/glazing masks are needed, I think! 

 

3 hours ago, Des said:

My pre-order with Airfix was delivered at 1800 this evening , looks good and I do like the idea of the Pilot's Notes being provided as a decal for the Navigator's table.

 

By coincidence the November issue of Scale Aircraft Modelling which is hitting the shelves around now in the UK has a lengthy 'Aircraft In Profile' article on the Anson with a good selection of colour profiles with alternative colour schemes.

As you have the kits can you offer a considered opinion on the wing surfaces? Other people (I'm not sure I trust) on other media are rubbishing the kit which I think is excessive. I also doubt that most have actually got one yet....

 

On 10/19/2022 at 9:15 PM, Sabrejet said:

It looks beautiful. I'm not a major hoarder but it feels like I need one of these while I work out what to do with it :)

 Pretty much my feelings too. Thank You for your help and kindness on my FJ-4B in the Matchbox GB. Now my shoulder is fixed and my right hand functioning I'll be getting the cockpit done shortly and getting it ready for the Caracal sheet to be released.

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Going to get this. Just wondering if there ever existed a smooth-cowled, turretless canary yellow trainer with the more sloping windshield? My father mentioned those differences in passing in the 1960s when recollecting his Nav training in Canada two decades earlier, when we built the tiny Airfix kit — but my nearly sixty year-old memory of 1965 might not be completely reliable! 

 

Tony 

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13 minutes ago, tony.t said:

Going to get this. Just wondering if there ever existed a smooth-cowled, turretless canary yellow trainer with the more sloping windshield? My father mentioned those differences in passing in the 1960s when recollecting his Nav training in Canada two decades earlier, when we built the tiny Airfix kit — but my nearly sixty year-old memory of 1965 might not be completely reliable! 

 

Tony 

Very much doubt it. Unless there is some photographic evidence. 

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15 hours ago, SleeperService said:

As you have the kits can you offer a considered opinion on the wing surfaces? Other people (I'm not sure I trust) on other media are rubbishing the kit which I think is excessive. I also doubt that most have actually got one yet....

 

Not sure of any technical terms involved but closest I can think of is that if it had been a metal surface it could be described as 'Oil Canning' but representing a fabric covered surface with a suggestion of a rectangular framework underneath instead.

 

Hopefully , I got the angle of the light right to illustrate this in the image below.

 

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2 hours ago, tony.t said:

Going to get this. Just wondering if there ever existed a smooth-cowled, turretless canary yellow trainer with the more sloping windshield? My father mentioned those differences in passing in the 1960s when recollecting his Nav training in Canada two decades earlier, when we built the tiny Airfix kit — but my nearly sixty year-old memory of 1965 might not be completely reliable! 

 

Tony 

Yes, but probably not  MK.Is.  This sounds very much like the Canadian-built Mk.Vs with a more bulbous fuselage and round windows.

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Mine arrived from Airfix today. My father flew the Mark 1 from Manston with No 48 (GR) Sqn and then with the School of Air Navigation from April 1938 to September 1939 so this was must to buy for me.

 

The wing detail is a lot more subtle in the flesh than any of the photos I've seen, the photos to me seem to over-highlight the texture. I think the way Airfix has produced the wings is perfectly acceptable and accord with what my father said when he described the Anson to me years ago.

 

Looking forward to building this one.

 

P

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I do hope this kit is not going to be burdened by erroneous judgements on its accuracy: as many have said, it looks beautiful and offers a lot for the money too. But it would be a real shame if it got a bad reputation due to the fact that the nay-sayers didn't know their Anson wings. Maybe we should not discuss that (now proven to be accurate) aspect of the kit now?

 

But it does further reinforce my strong dislike of pre-release critique. Or pre "I have one in my hands, know the subject and can provide an objective assessment" critique.

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A fabric covered wing over internal structure will be smooth when the fabric is freshly doped. This time the fabric stetches under load so you will see sag between the ribs on a static aircraft, although this will actually dome or quilt on upper surfaces when the aircraft is flying.  This is how the postwar Anson C, Mk.19 series 2 and commercial Avro 19s were made.  However, the prewar and wartime Anson wings were entiurely wooden structures, as said above.  They had a smooth plywood skin covered in doped fabric for weather protection.  They would not suffer from sag nor quilting unless the underlying skin was sodden, and the aircraft unfit for flight.

 

The Airfix wing seems to be odd, implying an underwing square structure and a worn fabric covering.  Possibly this is what a postwar wing would look like, I don't know.  It might be interesting to check the wingspan, as the metal structure wings had a 1ft greater span. Until someone comes up with a photo of a wartime wing showing this effect, I will doubt it.  But if you like it, well it's your model.

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Searching the web for photographs of Anson wings: some photos showing A/C in restoration.

it seems to me that the Anson wing was a reasonably conventional wooden wing, but with wider than normal rib spacing and skinned with thin ply, pinned and glued to the main structure. It was then fabric covered.  

An old tired wing could well show the sagging effect that Airfix have represented. 

 

This is an interesting thread from a few years ago. 

 

Worth a read through, I think. 

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8 hours ago, tony.t said:

Going to get this. Just wondering if there ever existed a smooth-cowled, turretless canary yellow trainer with the more sloping windshield? My father mentioned those differences in passing in the 1960s when recollecting his Nav training in Canada two decades earlier, when we built the tiny Airfix kit — but my nearly sixty year-old memory of 1965 might not be completely reliable! 

 

Tony 

From your dedription, I Very much doubt it. Unless there is some photographic evidence. 

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