Jump to content

Any good images of Lancaster III wing walkway markings?


Recommended Posts

Are there any good images of the walkway markings on a Lancaster III (I assume the Mk I would be the same) ?

 

I'm building the Hasegawa 1:72 Lanc and have decided to paint the walkway markings rather than use the kit decals - I hate long thin decals.

 

I've done some research on this and have a few images but none are particularly clear. I'm reluctant to rely solely on the kit instructions.

 

I'm building a Mk III which was delivered in January 1944 if that's relevant.

 

thanks

Mark 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This might help with part of the wing walk markings

 

Avro Lancaster service colour

 

I'm not sure of the source of this - it's from my hard drive. Happy to remove if Mods or any readers request

 

HTH

 

SD

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks @SafetyDad- that's very helpful. Hasegawa's decals are completely different to that of course. The two moderately useful images I've found also have the single line from fuselage to inner engine and then a double from the inner engine outwards - although where those double lines end seems to vary. The rearmost lines seem to mirror the forward lines. Hasegawa has all the lines being continuous which may be the case on these two images but it's difficult to be sure - although definitely not the case on yours.

 

Images of Lancasters from above are a rarity - not surprisingly of course.

 

This from the IWM:

5jxaYuBh.jpg

 

And this from World War Photos:

dUbjRfuh.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Mancunian airman said:

You will note that the walk way lines are not the same length in the b/w photos  . .

Yes - they end in different positions towards the wing tips. The image of the BBMF Lancaster shows similar markings to that shown on the IWM image.

 

I think I'll probably be going for a 'good enough' approach.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is one from above:

 

PGuyanS17010016.2.jpg

 

bomb doors open, turrets trained to starboard for a possible threat and a replacement elevator.

 

Jari

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very bright night and really quite low for a Lancaster bomb run that photo! And taken from what as its directly above? And it seems to ge bombing fields!

 

Surely a posed photo? Very nice though. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Phoenix44 said:

Very bright night and really quite low for a Lancaster bomb run that photo! And taken from what as its directly above? And it seems to ge bombing fields!

 

Surely a posed photo? Very nice though. 

 

Looks to be fitted with the later bulged bomb doors.

 

 

Chris

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's an old Dirk Bogarde film, Appointment in London. I remember seeing a segment around the 3/4 mark with a chap working on the wing.

You can see that it's a three colour roundel but I hoped that the walkway was visible for you.

All I can find on the tube is the start of the film. But it's worth watching and listening to anyway. Full throttles for take off. Glorious sound!

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/10/2022 at 5:21 PM, Phoenix44 said:

Very bright night and really quite low for a Lancaster bomb run that photo! And taken from what as its directly above? And it seems to ge bombing fields!

 

Surely a posed photo? Very nice though. 

Bomber Command did bomb in daylights hours  . . . 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/10/2022 at 5:21 PM, Phoenix44 said:

Very bright night and really quite low for a Lancaster bomb run that photo! And taken from what as its directly above? And it seems to ge bombing fields!

 

Surely a posed photo? Very nice though. 

You can’t actually see this aircraft’s bomb(s): don’t forget that the bombs will be travelling at the same speed as their carrier aircraft when released and will retain much of that forward speed until impact; they will therefore have to be dropped some distance short of the target, how far short dependent on weapon size/mass, speed, altitude, head- or tail-wind and several other variables.  It’s also entirely possible that this aircraft’s crew had already dropped their weapon(s) and were clearing the target area; with such a close-cropped image it’s pretty much impossible to tell.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why assume this picture was taken at night, or even on an operation? 

 

There sure is a lot of sunlight, or else the moon is awfully bright to be throwing distinct shadows like that.  It could easily have been an equipment test, or a training flight or even a publicity photo shoot.

 

Interesting details though, including the rotated turrets and bulged bomb doors.

 

Posed?  Sure, why not?  Or at least planned.  Cameras back then were heavy, bulky things, nothing automatic to do the work for you.  And then you had to do the work of processing the film and prints.  Not like today when any kid with a phone can go snap happy. 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Daylight missions were flown, especially later in the war, as for the above pic i posted, my guess it's just after D Day bombing troop concentrations, or armour formations. Here is another daylight mission:

 

Lancaster_Bomber.jpg

 

Jari

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another interesting shot.  Note the forward-placed Martin turret. the cabin heater intake above the wing and the apparent lack of flame dampers.  Great stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...