Jump to content

Sports Plane (03835) 1:32


Mike
 Share

Recommended Posts

Sports Plane (03835)

1:32 Carrera Revell

 

boxtop.jpg

 

The Piper PA-18 Super Cub was developed after WWII as a single-engined civilian aircraft, or “sports Plane” as it is sometimes referred to, especially on the front of model boxes.  It was a development of the Cub line of aircraft, but was substantially different in that it was more powerful and a more “professional” type of aircraft, having flaps, twin fuel-tanks and a 150hp Lycoming engine as standard, although over the intervening years many have been re-engined with other power-plants, some more powerful, some not.  Over 10,000 have been made, and they have seen use all over the world, with a particular following amongst bush pilots, who value its slow-speed handling, incredibly short take-off run and its simple mechanical make-up that makes it relatively easy to repair due to its tubular framework with doped canvas outer skin, and readily available spares.  As well as the civilian operators, a number of military users have had them on charge over the years, with various designations beginning with L-18.  The Civilian variant usually stuck with PA-18 and used various numbers in relation to the engine fitted at the factory, but as already mentioned there have been many alternatives used over the years.  One inventive individual even converted the type to a biplane in order to improve its high-altitude handling so that it could be better used in extremely isolated mountainous regions.

 

 

The Kit

This is a re-release of the 2007 tooling from Revell as a special “Builder’s Choice” boxing, and it has been tricked out in a handsome set of German decals, including the colours of the modern German flag on the tailfin.  It arrives in a shallow end-opening box with a painting of the aircraft in flight on the front, and inside are nine sprues of various sizes in white styrene, two in clear that were still tenuously linked together in my box, the instruction booklet and the decal sheet in between the safety sheet, which seems to have been printed on glossy paper this time.  It’s a nicely detailed kit in this scale, although it does have a few features of its era, such as the occasional sink mark and ejector-pin here and there, but it’s nothing to be overly concerned about unless you have a low panic threshold.

 

sprue1.jpg

 

sprue2.jpg

 

sprue3.jpg

 

sprue4.jpg

 

sprue5.jpg

 

clear.jpg

 

Construction begins with the cockpit in a move that won’t surprise many modellers.  The floor is quite substantially curved, as it follows the line of the fuselage underside, which it follows once completed.  The two sidewalls have curved lower edges too as you’d expect, and each one has a short painting guide, which also points out some decals that are applied at the same time.  The floor has a few ejector-pin marks to be hidden away before it is detailed with a number of controls, including the linked control columns, with the two seats and their moulded-in seatbelts added to raised parts of the floor.  The belts are well-moulded, and are individually arranged on the seats, so should look good under some carefully-applied paint.  The fuselage halves are then shown for painting of their interior, with a black lip around the edges of the windows at the rear.   The cockpit is built up in a basket-like shape starting with the cockpit sides, with two rectangular frames tying the sides together along with a rear bulkhead, then the cockpit floor is placed inside and joined by the rear parcel shelf and the two-part structure that forms the head-liner over the shelf.  Bracing rods are added across the roof and in a V-shape down the windscreen, locking into the two-part instrument panel, which has a decal for its dials.

 

A brief interlude has you making the clear centre-panel of the upper wing spar by slipping two aerofoil-shapes over the fully clear part without glue, then setting it aside while you close up the fuselage around the cockpit, adding rear quarterlights from the inside as you go, and closing over the front with a firewall aft of the engine bay.  With the glue cured on the fuselage, the upper centre wing is installed along with the rest of the glazing, with a curved windscreen and optional straight side windows, where your choice of glue will be important so you don’t fog the wide expanses of clear styrene.  A section of the cockpit floor is added below, and the N-shaped engine mounts are glued to the firewall, with two scrap diagrams showing their orientation once installed.  The Lycoming engine is a flat-four, with all cylinders depicted along with the various rods, housings and a long drive-shaft passing through it.  Plenty of piping is woven around the block for air and exhaust pathways, with a final diagram showing the completed unit before it is bracketed by two L-shaped panels that have the cylinder head tops moulded into them.  The engine fits neatly to the mounts, and the panelling is added around it, taking care to ensure that the circular drive-shaft opening in the front cowling is centred on the shaft itself.  There’s another scrap diagram to assist you with the final arrangement here too.

 

The wings are straight with round tips, and each one has a separate aileron and flap added as the top and bottom halves are joined, with small lollipop tip-lights also fitted into channels as you go.  The port wing has a landing light cut from the leading edge that is fitted with a contoured clear part and a representation of the twin lenses within the wing.  The completed wings slide onto the clear centre wing section, which has a vertical spar along its length to counter the brittle nature of thin clear styrene that we all know and loathe.  There is a slot within the wing for the two to mate, and it would be an idea to consider using epoxy resin to glue the wings with, as it definitely won’t create any bloom in the clear part, which could conceivably creep into the centre section that we wish to remain clear.  Each wing has a V-shaped support with another inverted trestle-shaped added at approximately half way.  All the attachment points are already laid out on the wing and elsewhere, and there is just a short length of wire needed to link the ailerons to the controls within the wing.  Wire, cord or stretched sprue would do the trick here.

 

The landing gear is fixed, and is mounted on a tubular frame with aerodynamic fairings and fabric between the triangular interstices, and the latter is where you’ll find a few ejector-pin marks to fill.  These and the extended X-shaped axles are fitted into sockets under the fuselage, then the wheels are made up.  There are two sets of wheels of two parts each, so choose the correct type, which have circumferential tread on each half thanks to some stepping of the mould surface.  They have their hubs added-in, with brake detail on the inner surface, to be slotted over the axles once complete.  Oddly, a pair of small holes are filled in the rear of the fuselage, appearing to be somewhat out of sequence, but in fact it is the opening shot of the tail construction.  The rudder is separate and has a pair of small clear lights fitted, one each top and rear, then it is glued to the fin along with the elevators, which need another few short lengths of control lines adding, as per the drawings.  The elevators are moulded as one piece per side, and fit to the fuselage sides on three pins each, in much the same manner as the real ones.  The tail wheel is a short, sprung strut with a diminutive wheel on a two-part yoke, which fits into a slot in the underside of the tail.

 

To finish off the build, the starboard side of the cockpit has its clamshell door added in either open or closed positions, with the glazed half having sliding windows moulded-in, and a handle fixed to the long edge of the trapezoid lower door.  The engine cowlings can also be fitted open or closed, but the two-bladed prop and spinner are generally required for flying.  A pair of short antennae made from stretched sprue are applied to the upper wing over the cockpit, with some brief instructions showing you how to stretch your own sprue if you’re unsure.

 

 

Markings

There is only one set of markings in this special boxing, and it’s for an attractive silver-doped airframe with a black nose and wing leading edges and a white lightning flash down the sides, with a colourful German flag on the tail fin.  The tail code is kind of appropriate too.  From the box you can build this airframe:

 

profiles.jpg

 

decals.jpg

 

Decals are by Cartograf, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas.

 

 

Conclusion

After dealing with a few ejector-pin marks here and there, the model should build up relatively swiftly into a classic of a design that’s wearing some handsome markings.

 

Highly recommended.

 

Currently, Revell are unable to ship to the UK from their online shop due to recent changes in import regulations, but there are many shops stocking their products where you can pick up the kits either in the flesh or online.

 

bin.jpg

 

Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit

 logo.jpg t_logo-a.png or facebook.gif

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just curious  - why have you started referring to everything Revell produce as Carrera Revell?

The kits are produced by Revell and carry no Carrera branding, the only links I know of are they have the same parent company and have a UK only distribution company Carrera Revell UK Ltd 

Revell and Carrera are two separate brands, referring to all Revell kits as Carrera Revell makes as much sense to me as referring to all Airfix products as Scalextric Airfix :confused:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In 2019 QCP, the parent company of Revell acquired Stadlbauer, who owns the brand Carrera, among some other brands.

 

As this is a rather strong brand in mid Europe, I guess they push the double logo for marketing purposes - or at least did for a while - and I think Mike just uses the logo that the company offers through official channels.  Knowing this story in rough by myself, it even took me some time to figure out in a bit more detailled level, so I guess the admins just take the sure bet and name the same company as in the logo. Maybe they changed marketing again and only use the Revell logo.

 

@Mikeplease correct me if I'm wrong, I'm just guessing.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was always - and still am - wondering why private or business planes are such a neglected topic in our modelling world. There are a few Cessna 150/170 around, some Piper Cups and Minicraft has one or two more, but that's it.

 

I don't now how many Spitfires or Messerschmitts are out there, in all versions and quality - from reboxing of 60ies molds to modern, perfectly enineered highquality tooled kits. And now think of a proper 1/48 (or even 1/32) family of Cessna 172, or maybe a Beechcraft Baron, with fine, modern molds, a Garmin upgrade from Quinta Studios, and a full force Eduard upgrade set with Photo Etch, Resin engines and weighted wheels. And now think about decal options. Must sell more than the 143th incarnation of a BF109P12/-14.

 

As in real life I could think that a whole family of planes could be made with realtively few changing parts, e.g. the Learjet family with longer bodies? Or think of the aftermarket suppliers, offering say a medical or "command post" resin interior?

Or even just a bit better than basic Cessnas or Piper. Doesn't have to be WnW, Trumpeter quality would do for me. 

But it seems to be a desert out there for small civil planes. or is it just me?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Chief Cohiba said:

I was always - and still am - wondering why private or business planes are such a neglected topic in our modelling world.

I guess there simply isn't the interest. Warbirds draw huge crowds at airshows, major airports always have hordes of spotters yet local private fields have few if any spectators despite usually much easier and closer access to the aircraft. Perhaps a case of "familiarity breeds contempt".

 

Cheers

 

Colin

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Dave Swindell said:

Just curious  - why have you started referring to everything Revell produce as Carrera Revell?

The kits are produced by Revell and carry no Carrera branding, the only links I know of are they have the same parent company and have a UK only distribution company Carrera Revell UK Ltd 

Revell and Carrera are two separate brands, referring to all Revell kits as Carrera Revell makes as much sense to me as referring to all Airfix products as Scalextric Airfix :confused:

This is the answer Julian gave to the same question on a previous review:

 

This is how they wish us to do there corporate branding from now following Quantum buying Revell. Not sure if or when they will change their boxart.

 

https://www.carrera-revell.com/en/

https://www.toynews-online.biz/2020/10/14/revell-to-supply-carrera-brand-to-uk-and-ireland-retail-from-january-2021/

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ckw said:

I guess there simply isn't the interest. Warbirds draw huge crowds at airshows,

Agree if you compare a Spitfire with a Beechraft Baron, to stay with it. But if you look at some odd, new releases, like Takoms Missouri or Yamato turrets, or the more odd topics from companies like Special Hobby, with their gliders and other weird topics. These can't sell in high numbers either. And yes, I'm aware that these latter are short run kits.

 

But there are no short run kits, either, no resin models, nothing.

And, I guess these could probably be pretty easy turned into either molds or resin or maybe 3-D printed, as a lot of these are available as 3D models for simulators and such.

 

You see, this topic haunts me for a while now. 😉

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Dave Swindell said:

Just curious  - why have you started referring to everything Revell produce as Carrera Revell?

 

Because they asked us to.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, Julien said:

Because they asked us to.

Fair do's, but it does seem a rather bizarre request when Revell maintains Revell websites, Facebook and Twitter pages that don't appear to mention Carrera at all, and major Revell resellers don't mention Carrera at all either.

The links provided earlier (one of which I'd looked at prior to my original post) also both specifically identify Revell as a separate brand to Carrera.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to see this back again - I smell a double build with one of their excellent 1:32 gliders for a ceiling hung "glider on tow" setup. I don't think anyone does a 1:32 glider pilot though?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Dave Swindell said:

Fair do's, but it does seem a rather bizarre request when Revell maintains Revell websites, Facebook and Twitter pages that don't appear to mention Carrera at all, and major Revell resellers don't mention Carrera at all either.

The links provided earlier (one of which I'd looked at prior to my original post) also both specifically identify Revell as a separate brand to Carrera.

They are branding as the Carrerra Revell Group with the brands still separate is you look at https://www.carrera-revell.com/en/

 

However if you are that worried/concerned/bothered/interested etc you can always contact them to ask why? Meanwhile we will just continue to do what they ask. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
44 minutes ago, John_W said:

If you are building a glider tug, part 153 and its appropriate counterpart will give you the modified tail wheel/towing point.

Thanks John! That said, I'm not sure the ceiling in the man cave actually has enough acreage for a towing combo! 😁

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Paul J said:

Is there  some licensing issue by not describing the subject by its proper Piper PA-18 Super Cub name???

 

Most likely. Whoever owns the Piper trademarks (company and product names etc) has either not allowed their use or wants extra dollars to use them (Caterpillar and Harley-Davidson are infamous for the way they charge for use of their corporate images). Possibly, Revell have produced the kit without any official permission at all, and thus feel that using the names might be pushing their luck a little too far. Corporate names and indicia etc can be a murky and expensive swamp. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...