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What's your latest acquisition Part VII ?


Duncan B

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41 minutes ago, bootneck said:

Some scaffolding and ladders, so that I can get to the top of my stash

Nice. A couple of bits of wood in the right place could extend the stash storage space too. 

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Not strictly new, as I had built it ages ago, but it had issues and I have only just got it working again after sitting on my other shelf of doom for years. Anyway, this:

kLz0PQBPMyGlHbdbIxJMEaHQFYi5ttBHlYkMbv8J

 

It's a fuzz pedal and is a hybrid of the Tonebender Mk II Professional with a tweaked Mk III tonestack (and a buffer in between) , silicon transistors rather than germanium ones and some extra modifications. I had built a simpler version years ago and that was one of the very first pedals I made. That was a popular DIY design which apparently several people came up with independently, but didn't prevent them from accusing each other of stealing their designs. Awkward.

 

I liked the pedal, but felt more could be had from the circuit. On the original, there was a Thin/Fat switch and this toggled between two input capacitors. Basically, the larger the value, the more low-end is let into the circuit. Rather than have an either/or, I now use a potentiometer to blend between the two. I also decreased the smaller of the two input caps from 10nF to 4.7nF, so it will now go from very thin and bright to huge amounts of low-end.

 

The other mod was to add a potentiometer after the feedback resistor on the Darlington pair. As this is increased, you can get massive amounts of saturation, compression and "sag". Combined with the input cap filer (named sub-sonic on the pedal) you can get everything from tight, bright distortion to monstrous, squishy fuzz.

 

It seems I wasn't the only one inspired by the original pedal, as the Basic Audio Scarab Deluxe is very similar indeed and has the same input cap blend as on mine, just going to show that two people really can come up with the same idea independently. His pedal has an adjustable bias rather than my saturation.

 

 

I'm very pleased with how this one turned out.

 

 

 

I also finished this one again. I say again, as when I originally built it, it didn't have the bit of the circuit for the toggle switch. It's a clone of a 1979 Version 3 Red/Black Big Muff. This was the first version to have the tone bypass switch (as it suggests, this disconnects the tone circuit, allowing the full frequency range through). It's the version favoured by Dinosaur Jr.* guitarist J. Mascis. It's possibly the version of the Big Muff with the most gain. It's pretty aggressive sounding, especially with the tone bypass

qnuyrNfEVHPWoL164aIGuuvqkRQLswog-Vvan8d-

 

 

 

This one was also finished to my satisfaction. It's a clone of the Jordan Creator Model 6000 which itself was a clone of the EHX Big Muff pedal from around 1972. The Model 6000 was not a dead-on copy, featuring low-gain transistors and a modified tonestack. I added my own usual mods, including the mids control (Big Muffs famously have varying amounts of "mid scoop" due to the nature of the tone circuit) to help cut through in a full-band situation and the treble pass capacitors which prevent treble loss when the volume and sustain controls are turned down.

 

This is more of a distortion than a fuzz and has its own flavour.

i-vPyU1o2zxiWG1u_EyDnlzodkmU9NShjBzmhqlK

 

 

And another BM clone I finished recently, this time of the V7 Red Army Overdrive. This was the first version built in Russia after Electro Harmonix went belly-up in 1984. IIRC, Mike Matthew's new company was initially called Sovtek and they made several ex-Electro Harmonix pedals until production moved back to the USA and was rebranded as EHX. This version has the least amount of gain of all the EHX Muff variants and sounds closer to the JC6000 than any EHX BM. Not as much boomy bass as the second Russian-Made variant (the so-called Civil War and Green Russian Muffs).

TXc9OwrTUNKuwjIgIiRXQKCrOh__STk1woy08fTa

 

I think I have some eight different Big Muff clones now, but I'm far from finished, as there's a huge number of variants and sub-variants, all having different sounds.

 

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My little UFO over in SciFi has rekindled my interest in 1/144 so have a Roden 1/144 C-133B Cargomaster enroute! :yahoo: Looking forward to that! :D

 

Cheers :bye:

Hans J

Edited by HansReggelsen
typo
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2 hours ago, jackroadkill said:

@lasermonkey, I can't see your pics in the above post.  Shame, because that pedal seems like it could be ultra-cool.

It’s weird. They were there when I was typing. Two disappeared when I posted and now they’ve all gone. Probably because I’m using Google Photos. I don’t have any other means of hosting the photos, due to running an ancient iMac and it’s equally prehistoric OS. Not sure what else I can do, to be honest. 

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15 hours ago, lasermonkey said:

It’s weird. They were there when I was typing. Two disappeared when I posted and now they’ve all gone. Probably because I’m using Google Photos. I don’t have any other means of hosting the photos, due to running an ancient iMac and it’s equally prehistoric OS. Not sure what else I can do, to be honest. 

 

I'd have liked to see the pictures too. 🙄

 

Google photos are no good for forums.  There are plenty of good free image hosting sites.

 

I use imgBB.

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I'll try Hobby Photos. It was the only hosting site I have been able to use for some time due to my iMac, OS and browsers being incompatible with every other hosting site I have tried.

 

Nope. That doesn't work either any more. I’ll try with my iPad:

 

p?i=5f101ec3467d6fc3506373ee684d4abf
The Tonebender (SST or Super Silicon Tonebender)


p?i=d9b5d98e4c77ebf4f02cf73a4c0fe6e4

The Cinnabar, which is the 1979 V3 red/black Big Muff clone

 

p?i=05c7a57fcef31bbaa0913643c74f2378
The Hornet Moth is a clone of the Jordan Creator Model 6000 from 1972 or thereabouts. 
 

p?i=ea49212007613f0403ab21aa5854ab0a

The Red Admiral is a clone of the Red Army Overdrive, the first of the Russian-built Big Muffs. 
 

If this doesn’t work, I’m kinda stuffed!

 

 

 

Edited by lasermonkey
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Just bought some effect circuit boards. I usually make my own using stripboard, but certain effects, especially modulation types, are quite complex and end up being overly large. Printed circuit boards have a distinct advantage here. The guy was doing a special offer of £5 each including postage. I have built a few of his boards before and was impressed. 

 

The PCBs I bought are clones of three chorus pedals (Arion SCH-1, Boss CE-2 and EXH Small Clone) plus a flanger (EXH Electric Mistress).

 

I had an Arion SCH-1 back in the 80s, but sold it to a friend. This was before they became popular and the price went through the roof! This particular clone doesn’t have the stereo output, but I will probably add one if there’s room. 
 

I have already built a CE-2 clone which has a stereo output and a couple of switches, but that needed to go in a larger enclosure. Having a smaller, simpler one may well come in useful. 
 

I never did have a Small Clone, so it seemed worth getting hold of. I expect I will build a stripboard version at some point and modify the living daylights out if it, but for now, this will suffice. I do have a vintage EHX Clone Theory pedal which a friend gave to me as it was broken. I managed to fix it quickly and he seemed particularly annoyed about that!

 

The Electric Mistress is another pedal that I never got around to buying or building before. I have said before that the EM is a flanger for people that don’t like flangers. An unpopular opinion, but I’m full of those! My reasoning is that the delay time on the EM is on the higher end for a flanger, heading towards chorus territory. It’s no surprise then that the effect sounds like a very chorusy flanger! Compared to my favourite flanger pedal, the Boss BF-2, I don’t think you can get anywhere near the intense jet plane effect of the Boss pedal. That said, it is a distinctive sound and one I don’t currently have. Another trick it has is a switch to disable the LFO. This results in a hollow, resonant clanging sound that featured heavily on one of my favourite Cure songs (Siamese Twins). 
 

Now, you can get some incredibly cheap EM clones in mini pedal format, such as the Mooer Elec Lady, but I’m not keen on the mini pedal format and these cheap clones have reliability issues with their horrible SMD components and crappy lead-free solder (as opposed to good quality lead-free solder) which makes them prone to dry joints and general failures. 

 

Anyway, I thought twenty quid for four circuit boards was a bit of a bargain. I already have most of the components, as I build pedals for my business. I just need to get a few enclosures in.

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@lasermonkey, I sold off most of my pedal collection years ago when I was skint, but at one time it contained both an MXR 117 flanger (mains powered and sounded like a 747 taking off) and a Boss CE1.  I sold them for £100 and £200 respectively...  Oh, how times have changed!  On my shopping list now are a Walrus Audio Slo (weird modulated reverb) and Polychrome (another flanger for those of us who don't like flangers).

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Naughty day for me ... takom 1/35 Bergepanther Ausf D and thunder models 1/35 BeegePanzer Heater early..... Both full interiors... Think next year might be the year of 5he engineer vehicles as I also got the AFV M60 engineering tank ...

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3 hours ago, jackroadkill said:

@lasermonkey, I sold off most of my pedal collection years ago when I was skint, but at one time it contained both an MXR 117 flanger (mains powered and sounded like a 747 taking off) and a Boss CE1.  I sold them for £100 and £200 respectively...  Oh, how times have changed!  On my shopping list now are a Walrus Audio Slo (weird modulated reverb) and Polychrome (another flanger for those of us who don't like flangers).

The main reason I have so many pedals now (I think around 145) is because I either built them or bought them broken and fixed them. Would you believe I actually prefer rackmounted effects? I mostly play post-punk/dream pop, or anything with whooshy sounding guitars. I have a fondness for vintage digital delays and reverbs. My pride and joy is an Ursa Major Stargate 323 of 1984 vintage. It's a very distinctive sounding reverb and is incredible on guitars and keyboards. I bought it cheap about fifteen years ago and it's now worth around ten times what I paid for it. I have a few Alesis, Boss, Deltalab, Lexicon and Roland effects, but there's a few that I'm still after, such as the Boss CE300 rack-mounted Super Chorus, Boss RPH-10 half-rack Phaser (I already have the RBF-10 Flanger which I like even more than my beloved BF-2), A Roland RE-3 Digital Space Echo (the other guitarist in an old band of mine had one and I loved how it sounded), a Roland SDE3000 digital delay, a pair of Yamaha D1500 DDLs, an SPX 90 and an FX500 (Slowdive in a box). If I ever had the money (which is unlikely) I'd stump up for a Lexicon PCM70.

 

There are some amazing digital pedals around now. Modulated reverbs and delays are right up my street. There's a couple of Strymon pedals I'd like, these being the DIG dual digital delay and the Big Sky reverb, neither of which are cheap. I'm also hankering for a couple of old Boss DD-2 delays. I believe they were the first ever digital delay pedals. There's something very distinctive about the quality of the echoes. Because they are only 12-bit, there is a grainy character to them. Also the bandwidth only went up to around 7kHz, so they're not bright-sounding. Mostly though, there's what one person described as a "halo" around the echoes, which apparently is due to the gate array chip used in this pedal (and early versions of the DD-3, the SDE1000, SDE3000 and a few other Boss half-rack units. Even with my 1966 vintage ears (and accompanying tinnitus) I can very much hear this "halo" effect. My Roland DEP-5 unit has a very similar quality and I find it inspirational to use. It's my favourite delay.

 

I do have a number of reverb and delay pedals though. There's a couple of Digitech pedals, these being the DL-8 Delay and the RV-7 Reverb. The reverb has Lexicon reverb algorithms, which drew me to it. The delay sounds equally good, especially the modulated delay. I'm not keen on the tap tempo implementation though and the looper facility is awful. Then there's my trusty Line 9 Echo Park which I use for tape echo sounds. I also bought a Zoom MS 70CDR for cheap and is a lot of pedal for the money. It does delay, reverb, chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo and rotary speaker. Not the easiest thing in the world to use, but loads of sounds in a small box. Lastly, there's the Behringer RV600 Reverb Machine. This is pretty much a direct clone of the Line 6 Verbzilla, but without the inherent distortion issue. I bought a Verbzilla ages ago, but sent it back due to the weird distortion present. It sounded like a digital glitch as opposed to a chip being overdriven and I googled it at the time to see whether it was a known issue, but didn't find anything. A few years later, and it was very much a known "feature" of the Verbzilla.

 

One pedal that I will build for myself is a clone of the Fairfield Shallow Water, It's a random modulation effect which is reminiscent of a knackered tape recorder with over the top wow and flutter. Think Boards Of Canada in a box that's simpler and cheaper than the Chase Bliss Warped Vinyl.

 

I modified a couple of old MXR 117 Flangers for someone a few years ago. These were mains powered units with the SAD1024 BBD chips. Amazing things. He wanted me to convert them from 240V AC operation to 18v DC. He was very insistent about having it done, despite the devaluing effect of the mods. A very peculiar chap. I built a whole load of pedals for him. Incredibly demanding, but he knew what he wanted and always seemed pleased with what he got. Anyway, I built myself an MXR117 clone recently. If it's good enough for John McGeoch, it's good enough for me! I'm also part way through a CE-1 clone, though I'm waiting until I can find the necessary BBD chip for a reasonable price.

 

 

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11 hours ago, lasermonkey said:

The main reason I have so many pedals now (I think around 145) is because I either built them or bought them broken and fixed them. Would you believe I actually prefer rackmounted effects? I mostly play post-punk/dream pop, or anything with whooshy sounding guitars. I have a fondness for vintage digital delays and reverbs. My pride and joy is an Ursa Major Stargate 323 of 1984 vintage. It's a very distinctive sounding reverb and is incredible on guitars and keyboards. I bought it cheap about fifteen years ago and it's now worth around ten times what I paid for it. I have a few Alesis, Boss, Deltalab, Lexicon and Roland effects, but there's a few that I'm still after, such as the Boss CE300 rack-mounted Super Chorus, Boss RPH-10 half-rack Phaser (I already have the RBF-10 Flanger which I like even more than my beloved BF-2), A Roland RE-3 Digital Space Echo (the other guitarist in an old band of mine had one and I loved how it sounded), a Roland SDE3000 digital delay, a pair of Yamaha D1500 DDLs, an SPX 90 and an FX500 (Slowdive in a box). If I ever had the money (which is unlikely) I'd stump up for a Lexicon PCM70.

 

There are some amazing digital pedals around now. Modulated reverbs and delays are right up my street. There's a couple of Strymon pedals I'd like, these being the DIG dual digital delay and the Big Sky reverb, neither of which are cheap. I'm also hankering for a couple of old Boss DD-2 delays. I believe they were the first ever digital delay pedals. There's something very distinctive about the quality of the echoes. Because they are only 12-bit, there is a grainy character to them. Also the bandwidth only went up to around 7kHz, so they're not bright-sounding. Mostly though, there's what one person described as a "halo" around the echoes, which apparently is due to the gate array chip used in this pedal (and early versions of the DD-3, the SDE1000, SDE3000 and a few other Boss half-rack units. Even with my 1966 vintage ears (and accompanying tinnitus) I can very much hear this "halo" effect. My Roland DEP-5 unit has a very similar quality and I find it inspirational to use. It's my favourite delay.

 

I do have a number of reverb and delay pedals though. There's a couple of Digitech pedals, these being the DL-8 Delay and the RV-7 Reverb. The reverb has Lexicon reverb algorithms, which drew me to it. The delay sounds equally good, especially the modulated delay. I'm not keen on the tap tempo implementation though and the looper facility is awful. Then there's my trusty Line 9 Echo Park which I use for tape echo sounds. I also bought a Zoom MS 70CDR for cheap and is a lot of pedal for the money. It does delay, reverb, chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo and rotary speaker. Not the easiest thing in the world to use, but loads of sounds in a small box. Lastly, there's the Behringer RV600 Reverb Machine. This is pretty much a direct clone of the Line 6 Verbzilla, but without the inherent distortion issue. I bought a Verbzilla ages ago, but sent it back due to the weird distortion present. It sounded like a digital glitch as opposed to a chip being overdriven and I googled it at the time to see whether it was a known issue, but didn't find anything. A few years later, and it was very much a known "feature" of the Verbzilla.

 

One pedal that I will build for myself is a clone of the Fairfield Shallow Water, It's a random modulation effect which is reminiscent of a knackered tape recorder with over the top wow and flutter. Think Boards Of Canada in a box that's simpler and cheaper than the Chase Bliss Warped Vinyl.

 

I modified a couple of old MXR 117 Flangers for someone a few years ago. These were mains powered units with the SAD1024 BBD chips. Amazing things. He wanted me to convert them from 240V AC operation to 18v DC. He was very insistent about having it done, despite the devaluing effect of the mods. A very peculiar chap. I built a whole load of pedals for him. Incredibly demanding, but he knew what he wanted and always seemed pleased with what he got. Anyway, I built myself an MXR117 clone recently. If it's good enough for John McGeoch, it's good enough for me! I'm also part way through a CE-1 clone, though I'm waiting until I can find the necessary BBD chip for a reasonable price.

 

 

 

Wow! That's a lot of pedals. 

 

As an expert on pedals perhaps you can help me?

 

I have a Dunlop Wah that I've had a long while but lately it makes a whooshing sound when treadled so I guess the pot has had it?

 

I've tried switch lubricant to no avail. 

 

Any idea of cost of replacement or fixing?

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1 hour ago, Neil.C said:

 

Wow! That's a lot of pedals. 

 

As an expert on pedals perhaps you can help me?

 

I have a Dunlop Wah that I've had a long while but lately it makes a whooshing sound when treadled so I guess the pot has had it?

 

I've tried switch lubricant to no avail. 

 

Any idea of cost of replacement or fixing?

When you say whooshing, is that a sort of crackling sound? To be honest, there's not a lot more that it can be. The pots of wah pedals do wear out. My old Jen Cry Baby needs a new pot, but I never got around to ordering one, mainly because they're expensive compared to bog standard pots. Thing is, you really do need to use a proper wah pot. I did try converting a standard pot, but it just didn't work properly.

 

Depending on the type of pot, it will range from around £10 to £30. I know, right?! I'm used to paying $0.50 for Alpha potentiometers! Whilst the physical replacement of the pot is simple, there's a fair bit of faffing involved with setting it up. Basically, the treadle doesn't rotate the pot across its full range, so you have to set up what part of the pot is used. This has the effect of positioning the sweep higher of lower in the frequency range. A small adjustment can have quite a big difference on how the wah "feels" in use and the last time I did one, it took quite a lot of fiddling before the customer was happy. If possible, it's best done by yourself, if you have a soldering iron. I'd be happy to talk you through it.

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Hannants sent, and Royal mail delivered with excellent speed these:

 

IMG_1031[1]

 

The J4M version with thermojet engine box art is indeed overprinted with the "Produced in Free Ukraine ..."  slogan,so it's a box that will be kept with the kit.

 

The Mitsubishi J4M Senden in indeed a what if, as according to my copy of Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War (author R Francillon) it never got beyonf the design stage, work on it being abandoned as the IJN were backing the J7W1 shinden. (I made the Hasegawa J7W1 in 1/72 a few weeks ago)

 

Though it's not clear howe the allies got to know about this design, it was, apparently, given the allied code name Luke.

 

The Mitsubishi design is very similar to the Mansyu  Ki-98 for the IJA, but that aircraft got as far as a prototype being built when Japanese forces surrendered.

 

What is pure what if is the version with jet engine, none of the sources I found mention it at all. I'm sure a BM'er will pipe up with a source for it.

 

Rather excitingly, the propellor kit comes with 3D decals of instrument panel and seat belts , and canopy masks to make life easier.

 

IMG_1032[1]

 

Rather sadly, though referred to in the instructions, the jet kit doesn't have the 3D decals -as seen in the sprue photos here;

 

I do have some suitable P/E seatbelts to dress the cockpit up a little.

 

 

 

Edited by Whofan
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I was offered a 10% discount on a Tamiya 1/72 Mosquito II/VI which brought it to just under sixteen of Her Majesty’s pounds, including postage. I thought that was pretty reasonable and as I very much like both the aeroplane and the kit, I bought it. 

It’s FOG Models on eBay by the way, in case you might want one. Just put it on your watch list and wait for the offer. 🙂

Edited by lasermonkey
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14 minutes ago, lasermonkey said:

I was offered a 10% discount on a Tamiya 1/72 Mosquito II/VI which brought it to just under sixteen of Her Majesty’s pounds, including postage. I thought that was pretty reasonable and as I very much like both the aeroplane and the kit, I bought it. 

It’s FOG Models on eBay by the way, in case you might want one. Just put it on your watch list and wait for the offer. 🙂

I use FOG as they carry the new AK interative acrylics, I shall keep an eye for bargain :)

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21 hours ago, lasermonkey said:

When you say whooshing, is that a sort of crackling sound? To be honest, there's not a lot more that it can be. The pots of wah pedals do wear out. My old Jen Cry Baby needs a new pot, but I never got around to ordering one, mainly because they're expensive compared to bog standard pots. Thing is, you really do need to use a proper wah pot. I did try converting a standard pot, but it just didn't work properly.

 

Depending on the type of pot, it will range from around £10 to £30. I know, right?! I'm used to paying $0.50 for Alpha potentiometers! Whilst the physical replacement of the pot is simple, there's a fair bit of faffing involved with setting it up. Basically, the treadle doesn't rotate the pot across its full range, so you have to set up what part of the pot is used. This has the effect of positioning the sweep higher of lower in the frequency range. A small adjustment can have quite a big difference on how the wah "feels" in use and the last time I did one, it took quite a lot of fiddling before the customer was happy. If possible, it's best done by yourself, if you have a soldering iron. I'd be happy to talk you through it.

 

Thanks for that, you are obviously very knowledgeable. I guess it is noisy pot type sound.

 

TBH with a new pot and fixing/adjustment (don't feel capable myself) it is not much farther on to buying a new one.

 

I actually recently bought a used Fret King version for  a very reasonable price and although it works just fine I'm not as keen on the tone compared to the Dunlop.

 

Oh well, first world problems. 🙂

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47 minutes ago, Neil.C said:

 

Thanks for that, you are obviously very knowledgeable. I guess it is noisy pot type sound.

 

TBH with a new pot and fixing/adjustment (don't feel capable myself) it is not much farther on to buying a new one.

 

I actually recently bought a used Fret King version for  a very reasonable price and although it works just fine I'm not as keen on the tone compared to the Dunlop.

 

Oh well, first world problems. 🙂

Any chance you could post a photo of the pot? If I can determine which type it is, I can advise better. I’d be happy to swap the pot for you, but you might have to tweak the pot’s position to your taste. Replacing the pot itself should be quick and easy. 
If you could make sure any wording and numbers which are on the pot are visible, that would be a great help.  Otherwise, just let me know what’s printed on it. 

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1 hour ago, lasermonkey said:

Any chance you could post a photo of the pot? If I can determine which type it is, I can advise better. I’d be happy to swap the pot for you, but you might have to tweak the pot’s position to your taste. Replacing the pot itself should be quick and easy. 
If you could make sure any wording and numbers which are on the pot are visible, that would be a great help.  Otherwise, just let me know what’s printed on it. 

 

Here it is. I had to partially disassemble it to get the pot free.

 

Any help?

 

spacer.png

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Many moons ago when Aerommaster still existed, I purchased one of their specials, it was a set of markings in 1/48 for CVW-8 on USS Nimitz on its 1977/78 cruise to the Med, it included markings for the 2 x F-14A's (VF-41 7 VF-84)  , 2 x A-7E's (VA-86 & VA87), 1 x A-6E (VA-35), 1 x EA-6B (VAQ-135), 1 x S-3B Viking (VS-24) and 1 x SH-3H Sea King (HS-9), the set contained enough decals for one for each unit on board, now of course that wasn't all the units, because Nimitz also had an E-2 squadron, and some RA-5C's (EA-3B's of VQ-2 also visited but my uderstanding is it was on an ad hoc basis), of course at the time there wasn't a kit of the E-2B or the RA-5C, but Kinetic and Trumpeter sorted that out (and Trumpeter even included the right unit markings in their kit).

 

The Holy Grail combination has always been the E-2B, firstly the Kinetic kit is an E-2C, but the conversion is relatively simple and was covered by Darren Roberts in an old issue of FSM back in 2012, the problem has always been the markings for VAW-112, as far as I know, they've never been done in 1/48, that was until I spotted that HAD Models had released a set of decals for the E-2's from "The Final Countdown" movie, the film was made in 78/79 so the timescale was right, a quick look on Hannants and voila! May I present the missing link:

20220617_154120 20220617_154131

 

I now have no excuse, I have the kits, I have the decals, just need to find the time 🤣

  

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6 hours ago, Neil.C said:

 

Thanks for that, you are obviously very knowledgeable. I guess it is noisy pot type sound.

 

TBH with a new pot and fixing/adjustment (don't feel capable myself) it is not much farther on to buying a new one.

 

I actually recently bought a used Fret King version for  a very reasonable price and although it works just fine I'm not as keen on the tone compared to the Dunlop.

 

Oh well, first world problems. 🙂

At the risk of turning this thread from "what have you bought lately?" to "the pedal fanciers' thread", I find the tone of the Dunlop to be excellent but I don't like the way it switches in at the very top of the sweep, so live I use a Morley Bad Horsie (despite the Vai association, I really like it) because it's switchless and it comes in at the bass end of the sweep rather than the clanky end.  In the studio I use a Cry Baby or an old Vox. 

 

*Disclaimer - I haven't played live or recorded for years!  Maybe it would be more accurate to say that I use the Morley when rehearsing for the gigs my band doesn't play!

 

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From Fonthill Media

Until today my only delivered purchase this week had been.

Canberra – The Greatest Multi-Role Aircraft Of The Cold War (Volume 1) , by Ken Delve and John Sheehan , published by Fonthill Media and released this week , pre-ordered copy and very much looking forward to Volume 2 in the next few months.

 

 

Then I went to The East Neuk Model Show this morning

 

New From Black Mike Models

Valom 48011 1/48 Britten-Norman BN-2A Islander kit , Belgian Air Component boxing

 

New From Alex Crawford

Combat Meteors , by Alex Crawford (and signed accordingly) , published 2021 by MMP Books , and a chance to  apologise for having bought the Javelin book elsewhere after speaking to him at Perth , .co.uk/.com confusion with addresses.

 

Second-Hand From Various Club Exhibitors

Monogram 5415 1/72 Boeing 737 kit , always wanted to get one of these , all 34 parts with most still on their sprues , going to be a challenge or perhaps an easier ‘what-if’.

Kitty Hawk 80111 1/48 Dassault Mirage F1CT/CR kit including Syhart Decal 48-060 1/48 Dassault Mirage F1JA 1979-2009 Ecuadorian Air Force decal sheet – what a lot of weapons and other stores in the kit !!!!

Eduard 8223 1/48 Grumman Hellcat Mk.I/Mk.II Dual Combo kit , albeit with only one complete set of parts/PE and partial decal sheet , looks to be more in proportion than the Hobby Boss kit I built a couple of years ago.

Modeller’s Datafile No.4 - The Avro Lancaster , Manchester and Lincoln , by Richard A. Franks , published 2000 by SAM Publications.

Airfix Magazine Guide No.11 – RAF Camouflage Of World War 2 , by Michael J F Bowyer , published 1975 by PSL.

 

 

And came home to a delivery From Key Publications

Some of their latest book and bookazine releases.

British Aircraft Of The Falklands War book , by Lee Chapman , mainly illustrated by more recent images of preserved aircraft and reenactors rather than period images.

Air Forces Of Latin America – Colombia book , by Santiago Rivas.

British Airpower Yearbook 2022 , Air Forces Of The World – North America , US Air Forces In Europe 1942-2022 all bookazines.

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