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Honda RC213 V '14 REPSOL Tamiya 1/12


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Interestingly both gut-wrenching and déchirant translate (by machine) to "herzzerreißend" (heart tearing) in German (with a "bone marrow shaking" as a second for a déchirant cri).

 

Removing the spokes and modifying/replacing them and getting a well centered (or "trued") wheel again (and a good surface at the seems) seems like quite a challenge (you were going one step further than anybody expected, "as always!"). Adding balance weights can be postponed indefinitely - or left off to achieve a clean show-look.

 

I'm not much of a chemist, I just google a lot 😉  so I can even come up with some French https://www.kremer-pigmente.com/fr/shop/dissolvants-produits-chimiques-additifs/70920-methoxypropanol-pm.html

please do check shipping cost first https://www.kremer-pigmente.com/fr/payment-dispatch/shipping-costs/ and maybe there is some supplier closer to your home.

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6 hours ago, Jochen Barett said:

Removing the spokes and modifying/replacing them and getting a well centered (or "trued") wheel again (and a good surface at the seems) seems like quite a challenge

Jochen,

You know how to inspire in me the desire to take up challenges, definitely!

I tried another method to improve the spokes. Let's precise that this improvement is not anecdotal: if the spokes are hollowed like that, it is obviously to lighten the wheels weight. That is why representing this H shape would be great. Has someone else ever tried to do it on the Tamiya parts? I don't know.

The problem with the first approach was to add the internal portion of the sandwich, considering that, to make things even more complicated, the thickness is not the same on internal and outer part of the spoke (not sure there is such a difference on the real spokes, btw).

Well, for this 2nd trial, after cutting and removing the spoke from the wheel, instead of separating it in 2 as I did, I used a flat file to dig the median groove. This was done of course both sides. After that, I replaced the spoke in place, glued with CA. As this is just a trial, I didn't spend too much time to get a fine integration. I just sprayed a coat of Mr Surfacer 1200 (can version) and here is the "result":

 

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The perfect tool to dig these grooves without cutting the spokes pity doesn't exist as far as I know: it would be an anguled at the bottom flat file:

 

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Cheers, O

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I don't think I've ever seen modelling like this before, Oliver. Super-attention to sub-details? Your work is amazing and your resilience in the face of setbacks is admirable.

 

This will be the first non-military thread I've ever followed.

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6 hours ago, Bertie Psmith said:

I don't think I've ever seen modelling like this before, Oliver. Super-attention to sub-details? Your work is amazing and your resilience in the face of setbacks is admirable.

 

This will be the first non-military thread I've ever followed.

What a pitty.

 

A friend of mine asked me to explain the meaning of "totally mad" to you,

so here is part of the explanation:

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235029538-missouri-armada-p-51d-mustang-documents-and-partial-scratch-from-the-tamiya-148-kit/

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235040668-ford-mustang-1964-12-convertible-116-from-the-coupe-amt-kit-the-indy-500-pace-car/

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235069609-de-turenne-nieuport-11-from-the-kit-eduard-148/

and he asks to re-emphasize that thid build thread is the result of "+++ I wanted a more simple project, an out of the box build. +++".

 

 

And Olivier, please excuse me for inspiring the desire to take up challenges. The steel used in files is rather brittle, so the tip will need some heat treatment before anybody can bend it to a 90° angle.

I have no idea how good the machine translated subtitels are, so better not watch this one, it may end in generating accepting new silly challenges (think about the dremel again, take a screw (maybe M2?) or nail as a blank for a drill bit and grind some groves into the head)

 

 

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Thanks a lot Jochen, very kind!

And as this file doesn't exist, I tried to create it (creating a home made tool is quite exciting for me). I took the Tamiya flat file included in the Basic File Smooth Double-Cut 74104 set bought recently, cut the bottom with a diamond disc and glued it under the new tip with CA to get this:

 

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Well, time to try this new tool on a spoke of the front wheel:

 

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Well, friends, this method requires training (I'm gonna practice with these unusable wheels), patience and should give a result that will remain a compromise, not as neat and regular as a 3D printed modified wheel could give, but unless an expert in Fusion arrives as the Messiah to provide me a STL file of these wheels, I should probably use it.

Notice that the spokes are much wider on the rear wheel. Will this 1 mm width grinding head be adapted? If not, I could create a 2nd anguled tool from another file. Totally mad, definitely...

 

Cheers, O

 

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Your drive for perfection never ceases to amaze me.

With regards to files would something like these work for you

 https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jeweltool-McGuinness-Riffler-Files-Pack/dp/B00K7ZW81M/ref=sr_1_5?crid=1VV8B8Q72LYTN&keywords=riffler+files&qid=1642057542&sprefix=rif%2Caps%2C152&sr=8-5

 

Looking forward to the next update either on this or your Mustang

 

  Stay safe            Roger

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Thanks a lot Roger.

I had myself tried to find the expected file, but none had the right shape, with a 90 degree angle. Jochen explained above that it was impossible to bend at 90 any tip file.

But modifying as I did the Tamiya file included in the rather cheap Basic Set (about 7€ for 3 tools), I could get exactly what I wanted.


Cheers, O

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Hello my friends,

 

I said in a previous post that the rear wheel being much wider, the width of the grinding head should be more important too (it was 1 mm for the front wheel).

In order to precise ths width, I cut a rear wheel spoke:

 

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In the same previous post, I also wondered if I could not mount the grinding head on my Proxxon PS13, to go faster than using the manual flat file:

 

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I began to try this approach: it is indeed faster but it requires practice. It is important to exert a very LOW pressure and to check (and clean the head with air) frequently. 

To get a smoother state of surface, I used a special blade slightly modified:

 

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Edit a bit later:

 

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It is interesting to see how, little by little, I found the best solution, that had to be finally very simple, with blades I had at hand...

My tortured brain had been searching for quite complicated solutions.

Well, it is so, and the most important is that these spokes will be improved without taking excessive risks...

Thanks again to Jochen who pushed me to go further when I had resigned myself to give up and accept a not satisfying compromise.

Of course, this is just a little detail of a very long build to come, quite complex if I refer to the great series of videos from a great french modeler, Didier, on You Tube (I recall below the link Jochen suggested in the Mustang thread), but every little improvement is source of joy for the demanding modeler, even if, except experts (and you, now!), no one will notice this improvement...

 

https://youtu.be/aDepvepBtqQ

 

Cheers, O

 

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Hello my friends,

 

I have been practicing and I found that my homemade tool required a new correction to be fine for the job to come:

 

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N.B: the rectangular head on the PS13 will be though kept for further possible use, as this anguled flat file btw, of course...

 

Cheers, O

 

 

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8 hours ago, gamblor916 said:

You can save yourself a lot of trouble by just buying Top Studio wheels.

!!!

Thanks a lot gamblor 916 for this suggestion.

I had been looking for such a set but didn't find.

Now are you sure these wheels (that look like the Honda RC213V ones, definitely) fit with this motorbike and the Tamiya kit?

If so, I will for sure order them.

But when I type in the Top Studio site: Honda RC213, this product is not suggested, unlike several other ones.

It is no too in the Hobbyeasy (less expensive than Spotmodel) site on which I ordered several details set (Top Studio Super Detail Set, Chain set, Footpeg, Hobby Design air valve).

And when I type TD23021 (the reference of this TD product) in scalemates, here is what is mentioned:

 

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Well, I am far from being a moto GP specialist, but I suppose Yam is for Yamaha and Duc for Ducati. 

Why, if this set suits for the Honda, didn't they write it?

 

I admit I have a doubt and I will order this set only if for sure, it fits. Now look at this comparison pic between my Tamiya wheels and the TD set:

 

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It would be interesting to know if some modelers bought this set and could use it quite easily for the Honda build.

 

Thanks anyway for your contribution!

 

Cheers, O

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I have the set but have not used them yet. It's not unusual for MotoGP teams to use the same suppliers. The wheels are made by Marchesini.

To fit them on the Honda you would simply have to modify the centre hub.

 

I bought these in 2009 so several years before the Tamiya kit.

 

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Ok gamblor, you nearly convinced me.

I will order this set only if, after having carved the spokes as mentioned, I am not happy with the final result.

It is anyway certainly the best option if you prefer to modify the central portion than carving the spokes, or also if you don't have the same Z shaped blades I showed above.

 

Cheers, O

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Well we  see how to take a complete kit and start to renovate (i.e.  to restore to a former better state [as by cleaning, repairing, or rebuilding]) the spokes of the wheels. And  I was so worried you would have nothing to do on this  kit except just build it :devil: 

But as a thought, have you considered using your 3D printer for the spokes?  With a good rendering and CAD could it not be a better solution?  Regardless I await your return to  "The Real Model"  yes, the Mustang. :yahoo: 

 

EDIT: I had not realized there was a page 2 when I wrote.  Now that I have enjoyed your skillful use of new tool making, I have amended the post to more easily reflect your current state of affairs. :coolio:

 

Edited by Prop Duster
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Thanks a lot Steve!

I have myself edited a bit my reply to gambler, since I am quite confident in my approach to improve the spokes.

It is clear that if I had known this TD set before I dig my head creating tools and before ordering a 2nd Tamiya kit, I would have definitely ordered this set.

Now about the Mustang (thanks for the kind thought), don't think I left it aside.

In fact, I had again state of surface problems but not at the same place this time. The devil spot had moved on the right side of the air inlet.

I didn't want to bother you again with these troubles, but hopefully I will be able to show a neat body everywhere very soon.

 

Cheers, O

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Hello my friends,

 

I got today my 2nd kit, a good new.

As I still have to wait the full setting after new primering, sanding and primering again on my Mustang (it is getting better and better but I can't say for now if all is fine), I decided to dig the grooves on the spokes, as seen above.

It has taken me about 1h30 to remove the moulding lines (again) and to carve the spokes, mainly with the Z blade.

I also deepened holes with 0,9 mm (rear wheel) and 1 mm (front wheel) drills.

Here is the result before painting:

 

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Cheers, O

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Hello my friends,

 

I said in the first pic of this new thread that building a motorbike was totally new for me, if I except the one I built when I was a teenager.

Watching the videos of Didier in You Tube, I noticed that it was not easy to handle the motorbike during the delicate assembly, much more difficult than a car, logically.

I also noticed that Didier, in the part 5, mentioned a video sponsored by Gravity.

I could easily find this series of great videos (there are quite a lot in YT dedicated to the Honda Repsol Tamiya) of David Thibodeau´s build.

Yet in the part 2, the latter shows a great jig used to handle the model:

 

https://youtu.be/WdfICaV4gXc

 

I could find it, only available on Spotmodel and yet, only in the "normal » version (the Premium version, full metal, is out of stock for now).

I decided to order this "classic" version, more than enough imho and ever not really cheap (105,46€ + shipping), considering that this stuff could be useful for further builds too.

Here are the 2 versions of this Marco Model Design jig:

 

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I forgot to say I got, in addition to the 2nd Tamiya kit, the Blue Stuff decal set, that allows to build the David Pedrosa Honda Repsol (the one I will represent) and to get decals (rather than transfers) for the tyres, and also the Decalcas vacuum formed windshield set (the Tamiya windshield is much too thick imho😞

 

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Several other details set are yet to come.

All in all, all this stuff represents quite a lot of money, but also should mean, hopefully, a nice and faithful final result, and in the meantime, many many hours of pleasure in building this awesome kit.

 

Cheers, O

 

 

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Hi again,

 

I come-back on the tyres question. My Honda Repsol will be clean, not weathered or so few. The pic below shows that, without being as bright as the later Michelin, the Bridgestone are not as flat as what Tamiya provides. That is why I go on with my idea to give a satin finish to my Honda tyres:

 

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It is clear that, in the race, the tyres come more flat...

 

Other question: should I wait to get the ordered Hobby Design valves (ref. HD 07-0020) or go on with the Tamiya ones, rather good since you remove the moulding line and apply a very small amount of Tamiya Liquid cement?

 

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Tip of the day:

 

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Cheers, O

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The jig looks nice and very usefull in order to get a straight bike model, but the price tag makes me dizzy. How much material and labor would go into building a jig like that once you have the "inspiration"? (assuming you have a drill stand or a drill press in the cellar already)

 

I just googled the kit's price and it seems one could get the basic kit for 40-50 Euro (anybody out there use a current calculator at your own risk) sometimes even including domestic postage.

 

 

Just forget everything I just said! That is a nice jig and it will ensure a straight bike model. And I'm confident, we shall see some of your improvements on the jig in the near future.

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Hello my friends,

 

I got yesterday the Tamiya detail set (front fork) and the carbon decals from Scale motorsport:

 

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Furthermore, I spent about 3h in removing most of the parts from the sprues, clean them, removing all inevitable moulding seams and round marks. Notice that the kit is great, at the best Tamiya standards, and the round marks are cleverly placed in areas where they should not be visible. But in the doubt, I preferred to remove them. They are stored in a suitable lockable storage box:

 

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Cheers, O

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Watch out for play in the fork where the plastic parts insert into the metal via poly caps. Mine has gone sloppy enough that it refuses to sit straight and needs remedial work.

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Thanks Ade for the warning, I'll take care.

 

A little update on the rims, as 2 coats of Fluo Orange (one yesterday evening, one just now) have been applied:

 

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N.B: not so easy to airbrush the paint in the spokes, especially now that they are dug...

 

Cheers, O

 

 

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Hello my friends,

 

A third coat has been necessary to get a more saturated homogeneous Fluo Orange, especially where the spokes had been dug.

The pic below shows that the Orange I get is much more faithful to the original than what you get with the Tamiya TS-96 suggested by the instructions, even if pics can't be totally reliable about colors:

 

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Cheers, O

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