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Which CAD software?


Robert Stuart
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Hi Robert,

I am very much an amateur at CAD and I use Fusion360.  It is free and, after receiving help from members on here and watching a few tutorial videos, I get good results with it.

 

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Mike

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The drawings can easily be exported to STL and you can get some nice fine prints from them:

 

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For me, the best Fusion360 tutorial for an absolute beginner was this one: Learn Fusion 360 in a few hours.  It comprises of 16 video episodes and I learned all the basic, and complex, needs easily with this.

After that, I started following Lars Christensen's tutorials online but I think the 16 episodes above should be followed first.

 

Mike

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OK, I'm in.  Took three or four goes installing.  I'll take a proper look at the software this evening.


Mike, @bootneck, that array looks stunning (radar?).  I presume it is a resin print?
I'm not sure that I could deal with the fumes in my small workroom - I have to share the room with the printer as it is working.
 

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2 hours ago, Robert Stuart said:

Mike, @bootneck, that array looks stunning (radar?).  I presume it is a resin print?
I'm not sure that I could deal with the fumes in my small workroom - I have to share the room with the printer as it is working.
 

Yes, it will eventually be a double bedstead radar and will fit onto the masts of my Ark Royal model.

I have the same setup, the printer is beside me whilst I am working on other stuff.  The trick is to use plant-based ECO resin, which the models above have been printed with.  There aren't the noxious fumes that are associated with the standard resins; plus,  you don't need a wash and cure kit, just warm soapy water.   I clean my prints using two sealable mugs, the types used for microwaveable soups etc., from B&M or similar.  I half-fill one with warm soapy water and the other with warm clear water.   On removing the print from the printer, I pick up the printed piece with a pair of tweezers and lower it into the soapy water mug and tightly seal the lid.  Then I shake the mug, fairly vigorously, for about a minute, then transfer the part to the clear water and give it a rinse for a similar time.  That's all that is needed and, if it is a sunny day then I just place the print in the sunlight to cure.  If it is dark, I place the part in a simple home-made UV box to cure.

 

cheers,
Mike

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22 hours ago, bootneck said:

The drawings can easily be exported to STL and you can get some nice fine prints from them:

 

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For me, the best Fusion360 tutorial for an absolute beginner was this one: Learn Fusion 360 in a few hours.  It comprises of 16 video episodes and I learned all the basic, and complex, needs easily with this.

After that, I started following Lars Christensen's tutorials online but I think the 16 episodes above should be followed first.

 

Mike

Wow! 

This is a very good print, which slicing software did you use?

Which settings did you use for this print?

I still have trouble with my new Phrozen Mini 4K printer.

The resin i use is Phrozen aqua 4K,  a sticky smelly, caustic stuff that reduced my enthusiasm for 3D printing to almost zero!

Regards

 

Andreas

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Hi Andreas,

 

the prints were sliced using the free slicing software from Chitubox with a layer height setting of 0.05mm and printed on an Anycubic Photon-S 2K printer.

 

Settings:

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The resin was Anycubic's plant-based ECO (non-toxic or smelly) UV resin.

 

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14 hours ago, Andreas.R said:

Wow! 

This is a very good print, which slicing software did you use?

Which settings did you use for this print?

I still have trouble with my new Phrozen Mini 4K printer.

The resin i use is Phrozen aqua 4K,  a sticky smelly, caustic stuff that reduced my enthusiasm for 3D printing to almost zero!

Regards

 

Andreas

What troubles do you have with the SM4K? I did quite a lot of additional setup work and added stuff to it, the latest being Phrozen's own upgrade kit for the Z axis.

I use Epax Hard Grey resin btw, I found Phrozen Aqua too viscous at normal room temperatures. For even lower viscosity, try Siraya Tech Fast Grey. But I find I get better detail sharpness with the Epax resin. You can mix in some Siraya Tenacious (10-20%) to make the resin just slightly elastic which helps with very thin parts and takes away the brittleness.

Yes, the resin odours are there, but I found that after printing a few times you get used to it very quickly...You still need to ventilate your print area well of course and wear gloves at all times when handling resin, cleaning alcohol or parts that aren't cured completely.

J

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  • 2 months later...

Ho folks, my wife bought me an Ender 3D printer for Chrimbo and I hadn’t dropped any hints at all, it was an inspired guess. I’ve set the printer up and have printed off a couple of things from the other thread listing go to places for STL files. This has got me comfortable with the machine whilst we’re still only days in. I’m now looking at the next step - how to create my own thoughts into design. So with the info above I’ll source that program and watch the videos. So brace yourself there will be questions. I predominantly do 1/32 kits and have a couple of ideas for years which now feel achievable.

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Nice one @speedy - I've had an Ender 3 v2 for a while now ... very pleased with it (though haven't planned any modelling with it yet).

You'll find various recommendations for CAD software; experiment with a few free ones, and see what works for you.
Personally, I prefer Autodesk Fusion 360, which is a professional level program that has a free option (it may take some digging to find the free option on their site).

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Thanks Speedy but that link to the UK site is the one I am having problems with. When I get to the Download Now bit it goes back to Sign In and then you go around and around... However if you go to the US site it seems to be working correctly and it is setting up even as I type this.

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Oh, no idea. I’ve recently just gone through the process (UK) and it was fine. Drop them a line on the contract us or speak with a human, unless you’re happy with what you managed to do. There is a 16 part tuition video and I’m on #9. It’s not that daunting as some are only 6 mins. I’ve got it somewhere I’ll drop you a link.

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On 10/26/2021 at 7:13 AM, bootneck said:

The drawings can easily be exported to STL and you can get some nice fine prints from them:

 

spacer.png

 

 

spacer.png

 

For me, the best Fusion360 tutorial for an absolute beginner was this one: Learn Fusion 360 in a few hours.  It comprises of 16 video episodes and I learned all the basic, and complex, needs easily with this.

After that, I started following Lars Christensen's tutorials online but I think the 16 episodes above should be followed first.

 

Mike

I have to look into this. I downloaded something, forget which now. Does this program let you draw in a vector style? Something like coreldraw or the adobe version of it? I understand vector drawings a bit since I draw decals.

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Very similar; in fact, you can import vector graphics (.SVG) into your drawing as a start or as an add-on. 

 

You could produce a complete model just by sketching in 2D, as shown in the examples below.

 

first, I draw a 2D sketch in Fusion 360.

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The relevant sections are then extruded from the sketch to make the body parts.

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Saved as an STL and sent to the printer

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Add a lick of paint and Voila!

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The completed model

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Mike

 

 

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I am learning with CATIA which is made by Dassault Systèmes as part of my Aerospace Engineering course at uni. It's awkward and fiddley.... But worst of all.... it's French!

 

 

Only joking we love our French neighbours

 

 

Or do we..................

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4 hours ago, Adam Poultney said:

I am learning with CATIA which is made by Dassault Systèmes as part of my Aerospace Engineering course at uni. It's awkward and fiddley.... But worst of all.... it's French!

 

 

Only joking we love our French neighbours

 

 

Or do we..................

As long as you only make triangular shaped wing aircraft only you'll be ok, ha ha.

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6 hours ago, bootneck said:

Very similar; in fact, you can import vector graphics (.SVG) into your drawing as a start or as an add-on. 

 

You could produce a complete model just by sketching in 2D, as shown in the examples below.

 

first, I draw a 2D sketch in Fusion 360.

spacer.png

 

The relevant sections are then extruded from the sketch to make the body parts.

spacer.png

 

Saved as an STL and sent to the printer

spacer.png

 

Add a lick of paint and Voila!

spacer.png

 

The completed model

spacer.png

 

 

spacer.png

 

Mike

 

 

That'll help, sure beats trying to carve that radio from a block of something. Have to try this. When I do, good chance I'll be bugging with questions. You just used the free option right? Thanks,

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