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In case anyone is wondering where this thread has gone, I decided the weathering was too much so I've sanded the hull back (which actually looks better sort of...) and will repaint and re-weather it.  While I consider all this, I've been building a model garage for my grandson....fun little project

 

Meanwhile, the scene shifts to the garage where I have a woodwork shop and a nice long bench.  At the start of this thread, I promised some rope making, here is my old ropewalk I made 20 years ago and have not used for over 10 years...

 

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The winding mechanism allows both 3 and 4 strand double line rope passing through the travelling guide head (that keeps the lines separate). I printed this one  years ago to replace the original wooden one

 

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The thread is tied to one hook, run out and back 6 times (for 3 double strands) and then tied off to the same hook.  Having a single looped line makes tension management easier.

 

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The travelling anchor allows the rope to get shorter as it twists, the line then runs to a ;pully and over to a weight (really bad picture, sorry).  The weight here is just a bolt, adding nuts allows my to vary the tension in the line

 

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Tension is EVERYTHING in ropemaking and there are no rules I know of, just plenty of trial and error.  Each length takes ~ 10 minute to twist until it seems ready to wind into rope.  This shot shows a length beginning to move.  When it decided to go, it should move the travelling guide all on its own if the tension is right

 

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After 3 hours of trying various line thicknesses and tensions and nearly reverting to drink before lunch, I managed to get the hang of it all again.  In the end, for this scale, the thinnest cotton thread I have worked best, getting it wound to the point that the double lines just start to kink and then hand working the tension by moving the travelling anchor backwards and forwards gently to encourage the guide back towards the winding mechanism, I was able to make a couple of decent lengths of 6 strand rope 0.5mm diameter

 

Nothing you can buy looks like true rope on a model, here is a coil ready to mount on the deck.  Working with rope not string, you immediately notice that it lays correctly.  I guess no one will notice, but I will know....

 

DSCN2436

 

Weathering update at the weekend

 

Cheers

 

Steve 

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Steve - I can't believe that you've done anything to that beautifully finished hull - FWIW I thought the weathering was spot on

The rope looks great but Dmitriy definitely has a point ;)

Rob

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What can I say, you have to try it to understand. 

 

Watch YouTube videos and it all looks so smooth and simple.  Trust me, it is tricky but worth the time.  

 

The counter twist on the threads create a balance of twist in the rope.  When you stop turning the wheels, they say in harmony and do not unwind as they are balanced.  The challenge is to get the tension to move the guide block backwards...

 

Oh sh*t I'm probably making things worse not better...  :nerdy:

 

No one taught me, I just had a go and failed a lot,....

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12 hours ago, robgizlu said:

I thought the weathering was spot on

Rob, It's nice of you to say so, but trust me, up close it was not good enough.  I hate painting, not enough practice.  I'm never really happy with the end result, but this one was too bad for me to stand.  The pictures flattered it. 

 

I will plough on once I can get back to it and hopefully find a compromise feels OK.  I keep saying, the model has to have a sense of realism, hard to describe but I know you and others here know what I mean.  This is a sense you get when looking at the model and it should get better the closer you look, even to the point of using a magnifying glass.

 

8 hours ago, Dmitriy1967 said:

This stops me from thinking of making a sailboat.

We can agree on that point Dmitiry, I HATE knots:raincloud:, minimum rigging is an essential prerequisite for me in a choice of subject 

 

Cheers

 

Steve

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12 hours ago, Steve D said:

No one taught me, I just had a go and failed a lot,....

Isn't that what modelling is all about?

 

I have no intention of trying that, or weathering, but can certainly appreciate someone who has mastered it!

 

Ian

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Hi Steve.  Great job on the rope.   I'm afraid I don't have your patience to make my own.

 

However, I did find the Syren Ship Model Company located, in the US as an alternative.  Among other things, Syren makes ropes for rigging model sailing ships, in a number of scales.  I ordered their 63mm dia. rope in tan colour for my Elco PT boat build.  It turned out to be a great looking & quality product that was very easy to work with.

 

40462106673_0af470a0df_c.jpg

 

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John

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Great build! 🙂

 

The Syren Rope is "ok" even they think it is the best .. it's not and unfortunately they are still selling rope wrongly laid, guess they don't know better.

 

You rope is S-Laid (sometimes called left-handed) but should be Z-Laid (right-handed). Usually only Cables are S-Laid.

 

If you like read more about here, "The Myth of left-handed hawser rope [in Ship Modelling]": https://forum.dubz-modelling-world.com/thread-41-post-438.html#pid438

 

🙂

 

cheers

 

Dirk
 

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15 hours ago, Dubz said:

You rope is S-Laid (sometimes called left-handed) but should be Z-Laid (right-handed). Usually only Cables are S-Laid

Ha, Dirk, you are correct of course :doh:.  However, that's just an accident of the way I twisted the wheel (possibly because I'm also left-handed....)  Didn't think it through

 

I appreciate your clarification, I'll do better in future

 

Cheers

 

Steve

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I'm still considering the paint and weathering so I'd thought I'd finish off the danbuoy.

 

This picture clearly shows danbuoys being shipped on the port side of the rear deck, a detail too good to miss out

 

fuFoH6e

 

I decided to paint it according to this image (I believe this is a flower class escort), great colour scheme,  For colours I found a picture of a WW2 danbuoy flag in an on-line auction that was white/yellow/red stripes so I'm guessing these are the colours in this B&W photo

 

MINESWEEPERS HARD AT WORK TO MAKE SEAS SAFE AGAIN. JULY 1945, ON BOARD A BRITISH ALGERINE CLASS MINESWEEPER OPERATING WITH A MIXED FLOTILLA OPERATING FROM THE NAVAL BASE HMS LOCHINVAR, GRANTON, SCOTLAND.

 

For rigging I used this illustration for an admiralty manual of seamanship Vol 1, this copy is post-war and the paint pattern is different, but the rigging makes sense and matches what can be seen in the picture above

 

danbuoy

 

They were carried ready rigged for immediate use as close examination of the first picture shows.

 

So, here is my attempt and reproduction, the rope will be coiled up and tidy when installed on deck but I left it open here to show I've rigged it correctly (flag and anchor not attached)

 

DSCN2439

 

I love these little details

 

Cheers

 

Steve

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Happy with this level of weathering (finally!!)

 

DSCN2440

 

One coat of matt varnish, new decals (the others were sanded off) and a lot of fussy work that can't be seen on this picture.

 

Flag, rigging, aerials and some deck clutter (rope, buckets etc) to go, plus my single crewman to help people understand the scale.  Out picking up the case tomorrow so not much time for progress, final update with more pictures on Friday

 

Thanks for following along

 

Cheers

 

Steve

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All things come to an end, as so does this thread.  The model is basically complete now, just the figure to add and that will be shown in the RFI thread shortly.

 

Meanwhile, the final update.  First the hand-painted ensign, hanging to dry after soaking in weak PVA to set the shape.  The little hand-vice is prefect for gripping and adding weight to the bottom corner.  This is a 2ft x 4ft ensign, the smallest I've painted, my new 7 inch magnifying lamp was very useful here

 

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Here it is on the short gaff (right term?) at the mast-head bit out of focus

 

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The aerials were made from heavy EZ line, with insulators at each end from fishing line shot weights.  Important to feed the aerial down to the radio set.

 

The handrails were run from satin silver "Soft Touch" very fine premium flex 7 stranded wire (0.010" dia.).  Anchored using 0.8mm thin wall brass tube squashed and painted aluminium.

 

A couple of buckets are seen on the deck along with a few rope coils (can't have too much rope).  Nestling behind on of the midships cowl vents is the Vickers twin tub gun canvas cover, folded up.  The sea ladder is left in the top Carley float and of course that Dan-buoy with its rigging is stowed on the port stern deck.

 

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Algae is growing on the waterline  and a hint of diagonal planking is discernible on the hull sides

 

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The boat hooks are in the forecastle rack and some rope stands by the anchor, the Lewis guns are ready to fire, but someone's coiled the mooring ropes nicely fore and aft

 

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Overall, she needs a good wash down when time and the war permits

 

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Thanks for following alone once again, I hope it was helpful to any wishing to embark on wood and metal construction. Apart from a few links of chain, this one is all scratch built for a total cost around £250, plus the case of course

 

It will be back is a RFI thread once I've sorted the case and mounting.

 

I will be back shortly with a companion thread on a British Powerboat Company 70ft MGB (before torpedo tubes were added).  Gives me a chance to made a twin Oelikon turret mounting

 

Cheers

 

Steve

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Thank you Steve, for an exciting journey into building this MTB! I like the way you show the process of making from natural materials. 👍

 

And I will immediately ask a question that interests me when I look at many models. How are these coiled ropes lying on the deck fixed on real ships? They can't just lie there, they'll be blown away by the wind and washed away by the wave.

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19 minutes ago, Dmitriy1967 said:

How are these coiled ropes lying on the deck fixed on real ships

From what I know, they just lay on the deck, wet rope is actually really heavy and hard to shift.  I also know that rope can get washed overboard...  However, the coiled ropes you see in pictures are (I believe) mostly done in harbour to prevent people tripping and (possibly) to show off

 

Thanks for your vocal interest through the build

 

Cheers

 

Steve

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My old Airfix (?) Victory shows coiled ropes are actually welded to the deck and integral to supporting the wider boat structure.

 

From my memory of photos I've seen, these are usually just left coiled on deck, as Steve has shown, both in harbour and underway (this may be because the photos I'm recalling are of a vessel about to moor), although it is useful to have rope on deck to hand. They are heavy, so I guess the answer is gravity and bitts/bollards, but I wouldn't imagine you'd have too many out at once in case it does somehow go overboard and/or fouls the prop.

 

David

(from the comfort of my armchair, if we have a Jack or Jenny to correct my guess?)

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