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Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I (early), Airfix 1/72


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Hi everyone!


Let me present my new model. This time it’s Supermarine Spitfire, one of my favourites.


There’s no need to specify the facts about the prototype because everyone knows this plane inside out and it’s one of the most frequently assembled models. However, I should point out that I wanted to show the qualities which were specific for early Spitfires. Those were the fighting machines whose creators had no idea about real combat conditions.  They were equipped by a streamlined flat canopy that didn’t provide 360-deg vision or have any armoured windscreen panel (when you come to think of it, the plane had no armoured protection neither for life-critical units nor for a pilot). Moreover, the early models were built up with an old-school two-bladed rotor and some throwbacks such as an antispin parachute, and there wasn’t any weapon heating. It rendered the fighter useless on apparent combat heights of German bombers because frozen machine-guns didn’t work there. In other words, the early Spitfires were like Englishmen with enormous potential but poorly aware of what was waiting for them in the heat of the coming major war. 


I’ve chosen Airfix A02010 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I/Mk.IIa set for assembling. The set makes a good impression, the details are well-fitted, but still there are certain drawbacks in canopy-fuselage attaching and wing-fuselage blending. The model is quite accurate, so it hasn’t raised a lot of my criticism. The only thing is that the upper part of cowl panel has square-flat shape closer to the Mk.V rather than Mk.I. The panel lining is pretty true-to-fact although a bit simplified and needs improvement. 


The model features the 9th manufactured prototype of Spitfire K9795 from the 19th Royal Air Force squadron in Duxford as in October of 1938.

 

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Thanks for looking!

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Beautiful and meticulously detailed and finished Spitfire.

 

You have even added the little gear-down indicators on the wings! But you stopped short of that very typical characteristic of the Spit – drooping elevators whenever parked. 😉

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

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Beautifull model, especially it is Airfix. You really gave real live for this model.

One remark. Maybe somewhat too much weathering for pre-war, early machine but it is only my personal taste.

Really pleasure for my eyes.

Edited by socjo1
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That's excellent work but I agree with sockjo1. It's too heavily weathered for a brand new peacetime RAF newly delivered Spitfire in October 1938. Six months  later.......maybe?

 

But your skill is well advertised. That's obvious.

 

 

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Some nice little early  Spitfire details that are often overlooked and seldom done- the different shade of Night on the spinner nosecap; the clear tail light; the gear down indicators, the ever-present oil and coolant leaks on the center section, and stagger of the .303 gun barrels. The drooped elevators would have added to the effect, but  the lack of weathering on the prop doesn't match the heavy weathering of the airframe. The markings look like they are painted on, and my comments come from a very jealous fellow modeler, and not meant in any way to disparage what I think is the best build of the Airfix kit I have seen so far. :like:

Mike

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i like it!

 

Its an interesting choice of version, and you don't see a lot of these 72 scale Airfix Spitfires built up with this degree of precision. I like how you captured a lot of what my friend would call "gingerbread house details".

 

-d-

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10 hours ago, Spitfire31 said:

But you stopped short of that very typical characteristic of the Spit – drooping elevators whenever parked.

I'd agree if it was wartime and canopy open, being worked on or ready to go, but when parked up, canopy closed and going no-where the control locks would have been fitted (pins in the rudder mechanism, and locking bars from the top of the control column to the seat and stbd cockpit wall.)

An excellent model with very good attention to the details of an early Mk.I, but spoiled in my opinion by the weathering. Pre war these machines were brand new and well looked after, this looks like it's been hangared in a coal yard. The technique and application is good but not appropriate for the subject.

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A truly outstanding model which is quite  hard to believe is based on the 1/72 Airfix kit.  The rivets you have added are some amazing work. Excellent paintwork even down to the two different sheens on the spinner.   

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Small masterpiece.

Too much weathering or not....matter of taste, but how you done a weathering is the point, it is done fantastic.

Taking care of so much details on such small model is amazing.

So only one comment...BRAVO!

Best regards Djordje

 

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7 hours ago, Serge Tkach said:

But just as an argument here is a prototype photo which shows that pre-war Spitfires were rather dirty.

Agreed, but only in specific areas - heavy fuselage underside oil staining behind the engine compartment, light deposits from shell case ejections chutes if guns had been fired, light exhaust staining down the fuselage sides and possibly some mud splatter from the wheels when airborne or immediately after landing, the rest of the airframe would be clean & polished. The above weathering would all be cleaned off by the end of the flying day at the latest, 

Control surface demarcation lines are barely visible, panel lines even less so and no sign of any rivets.

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Serge, could you explain how did you do small window in canopy (its left side)?

And what paints did you use?

Regards,

Michał

Edited by socjo1
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4 hours ago, Dave Swindell said:

Agreed, but only in specific areas - heavy fuselage underside oil staining behind the engine compartment, light deposits from shell case ejections chutes if guns had been fired, light exhaust staining down the fuselage sides and possibly some mud splatter from the wheels when airborne or immediately after landing, the rest of the airframe would be clean & polished. The above weathering would all be cleaned off by the end of the flying day at the latest, 

Control surface demarcation lines are barely visible, panel lines even less so and no sign of any rivets.

 

Dave,

thank you for your opinion! 🤝 

 

I generally agree that I've overdone the weathering. But it is also well known that Spitfires, especially of early modifications, had problems with oil leakage, which led to very noticeable drips, and this problem was never completely resolved. This is what I wanted to show in my model.

 

As for the rivets and panel lines, in my opinion, they make the model less "flat". Of course, in 1/72 scale, this is done with certain assumptions. I think that still makes the model more interesting.

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2 hours ago, socjo1 said:

Serge, could you explain how did you do small window in canopy (its left side)?

...

 

Michał,

that small window to the left of the canopy is a decal.

 

8 hours ago, supersonic said:

...

what colors did you use?

 

Cheers

Hans

 

2 hours ago, socjo1 said:

...

And what paints did you use?

 

Hans, Michał,

I used Tamia acrylics: XF-52:5 + XF-49:1 for Dark Earth, XF-61 for Dark Green  and Revell enamels № 90 silver for the lower surfaces.

 

Edited by Serge Tkach
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