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Erinyes over Denmark (1/72 464 Squadron Tamiya Mosquito FB.VI)


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9 hours ago, Procopius said:

Yorkshire tea it is, then! A box will be delivered to Hedgehog Manor tomorrow, and I shall issue a full report.

 

I'm a Taylors (of Harrogate) tea fan too; 'though there's an element of localism in that seeing as it's based only 4 miles up the road from me and supplies all the tea and coffee to Bettys tea rooms (its sister company and a harrogate (and Yorkshire) institution). 

 

Actually, Taylors Earl Grey is our tipple of choice;  but I've learned to keep some Yorkshire tea in stock for them as eschew the bergamot (e.g. my Dad who won't have any of that 'perfumed nonsense') :D

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My other half drinks Rooibus/Redbush tea because it is caffiene free, I can't abide the smell of it, English Breakfast Tea or Yorkshire Tea for me..... Must check out that Irish tea, sounds like just the job.....

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8 hours ago, perdu said:

I believe tha will be reet 'appy wi' Yarksha Tea PC.

 

👍

 

7 hours ago, AdrianMF said:

+1 for Yorkshire, from an ex PG tips guy.

 

I had some Yorkshire Gold this AM; I steeped it for five minutes, but found it a tad bitter and malty when I had it with nothing in it. So I cracked and added 1/4 cup of milk (36 calories) and two teaspoons of sugar (30 calories), and it was quite smooth and excellent. This is probably the first time I've drunk milk in any form in over a decade. Losing 65 of my 1400 calories is a bit of a blow, but it may be worth it for this.

 

2 hours ago, Quiet Mike said:

If I have to drink tea sans milk, I prefer Rooibos or Redbush (Tick Tock is my prefered brand)  It is an aquired taste. My other half thinks it's made from bonfire ash. Good points - plenty of antioxidants

Bad points - caffine free

 

40 minutes ago, Kitsticker said:

My other half drinks Rooibus/Redbush tea because it is caffiene free, I can't abide the smell of it, English Breakfast Tea or Yorkshire Tea for me..... Must check out that Irish tea, sounds like just the job.....

 

Rooibos is right out for me because I need the caffeine, but it sounds terrifying. Also, by happy accident, being fat these past few years has kept me looking like a smooth-faced giant baby, so no fear of wrinkles.

 

1 hour ago, Fritag said:

 

I'm a Taylors (of Harrogate) tea fan too; 'though there's an element of localism in that seeing as it's based only 4 miles up the road from me and supplies all the tea and coffee to Bettys tea rooms (its sister company and a harrogate (and Yorkshire) institution). 

 

Actually, Taylors Earl Grey is our tipple of choice;  but I've learned to keep some Yorkshire tea in stock for them as eschew the bergamot (e.g. my Dad who won't have any of that 'perfumed nonsense') :D

 

I do have some of their Lady Grey tea,  as befits my effete nature, which is quite drinkable with no sugar or milk. So a point for that over Yorkshire Gold. 

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Depending on the hardness of your water, five minutes steeping is likely to be too much with Yorkshire Tea. The tannins will become overpowering. I'd try 1-2 minutes if you're not having milk.

I live in a hard water area and am used to leaving teabags in for an age, though I do take milk, without sugar. My favourite part of Suffolk has the softest water I have encountered. I only have to leave the teabag in for thirty seconds, tops, and I like my tea fairly strong.

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I'm not sure how hard or soft the water from Lake Michigan is or isn't, sources seem to differ on this front. I'll experiment.

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The shower is fine, it's when water skiing you find out how hard water actually is

:coat:

 

 

(/me lives in a hard water area - you should see the water cooker, needs de-calcification every three weeks)

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18 minutes ago, Procopius said:

I'm not sure how hard or soft the water from Lake Michigan is or isn't, sources seem to differ on this front. I'll experiment.

We have a well, but also a very necessary water softener. Without it, a month’s worth of water will leave everything needing a vinegar bath.

 

I find one to two minutes to be right for brewing, and if you’re using tea bags, don’t squish them against the side of the cup more than once, as that can make the tea bitter.

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Five excessive minutes there PC, as advised two is ideal.

 

I am with Steve's dad, perfumed tea is anathema to me.

 

Yikes, am I really giving teadvice to the gentry?

 

Wow.

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A bit late in the great tea debate Edward, but I can vouch for Yorkshire tea of various kinds, although my wife ensures we have competing stocks of Clipper Tea https://www.clipper-teas.com/, which is a good Dorset brew I must admit.

 

And in other news, I have just completed a round trip up to Winchester and back to help my daughter move into her new house. As I had indicated would be the case (elsewhere), I was accompanied on my return trip by a large stock (5Kg) of T28 Silicone Rubber. Others may not get the significance of this boring fact, but I think Edward will!

 

Terry

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5 hours ago, Quiet Mike said:

If I have to drink tea sans milk, I prefer Rooibos or Redbush (Tick Tock is my prefered brand)  It is an aquired taste. My other half thinks it's made from bonfire ash. Good points - plenty of antioxidants

Bad points - caffine free

 

I drink all my tea black. No milk and never, ever any sugar!

 

 

Chris

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One minute and a good squish against the side of the mug for me, followed by just enough milk to turn it opaque. And wash the mug once a week whether it’s dirty or not. Disgusting to some, but it works for me.

 

Regards,

Adrian

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45 minutes ago, AdrianMF said:

One minute and a good squish against the side of the mug for me, followed by just enough milk to turn it opaque. And wash the mug once a week whether it’s dirty or not. Disgusting to some, but it works for me.

 

Regards,

Adrian

That sounds like my mug when I was in the toolroom Adrian, lovely cuppa guaranteed.

 

(I would not be allowed to get away with it in a domestic setting... Happy days)

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3 minutes, on the timer, and that'll do for me.. hard-ish water area here

 

If you're gonna have a cuppa tea, have it blooming proper

 

Provocational I know

 

You can't get Brits discussing tea without 'some heat........'

 

It's the one thing that makes us Brits.......

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We've just converted to Yorkshire Tea and it's rather nice.  Yorkshire seem to be making a bid for world domination judging by the recent increase in presence on shelves in our area!

 

If PC were an armour modeller, rather than RAF (who only drink tea in proper cups and saucers with pinkies raised 🤣), I would have suggested a proper wartime "Brew"; leaf tea, condensed milk and plenty of sugar, all left to stew on the fire for a few hours with a smidge of petrol (gasoline) and sand for that authentic taste.  I've only had the closely related Aussie outback Billy tea, refreshing in the desert but probably too much for home consumption, especially the sugar load!!

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Current tea status: Yorkshire Gold, steeped two minutes, 1 tablespoon (about 15 ml) 2% milk (it's what we have), and two teaspoons sugar (approximately two lumps). It's very pleasant and relaxing, and so far a nice start to my day.

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I'm a little late in the tea debate, but I've had to cut back on the milk and sugar too.  For unadorned tea, I have a tea bottle that I keep filled with loose leaf Sencha green tea, which I love.  Don't buy green tea in bags because it tastes like dishwater.  For proper tea, (e.g. black), I like Lapsang Souchong but that's definitely and acquired taste, being a smoked tea.  Early gray is nice if made properly.

 

I think I'll have to try the Yorkshires out -- with fans like these, how can I go wrong?

Edited by opus999
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6 hours ago, malpaso said:

If PC were an armour modeller, rather than RAF (who only drink tea in proper cups and saucers with pinkies raised 🤣), I would have suggested a proper wartime "Brew"; leaf tea, condensed milk and plenty of sugar, all left to stew on the fire for a few hours with a smidge of petrol (gasoline) and sand for that authentic taste.  I've only had the closely related Aussie outback Billy tea, refreshing in the desert but probably too much for home consumption, especially the sugar load!!

 

do have a Sherman Firefly in the stash, just working up the courage to build it.

 

When I wanted to join the Army in 2003 after college, I wanted to be a tank commander or intelligence officer, but the recruiter advised me that the army was full up on whatever I was, and had no need of more. Given in 2003 they were taking any warm body they could, that should give you an idea of what poor stock I was.

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1 hour ago, Procopius said:

two teaspoons sugar


Now to wean yourself off the sugar. I did it in my 20s by steadily lowering the amount until one day I wasn’t putting any in my hot drinks at all. Nigh on forty years later my Dad still forgets and heaves sugar in! 

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1 hour ago, Heather Kay said:


Now to wean yourself off the sugar. I did it in my 20s by steadily lowering the amount until one day I wasn’t putting any in my hot drinks at all. Nigh on forty years later my Dad still forgets and heaves sugar in! 

I went cold turkey when I was 19. One of my better decisions as a teen, it has to be said!

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By the way, did you ever find out about the Nav's side window? I'm at the stage on my FB.VI (HR250/DZ@P of No. 151 Sqn) where I need to fit the canopy and I'm unsure of which insert to fit. I'm kinda erring towards the flat one.

Cheers,

Mark.

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12 minutes ago, lasermonkey said:

By the way, did you ever find out about the Nav's side window? I'm at the stage on my FB.VI (HR250/DZ@P of No. 151 Sqn) where I need to fit the canopy and I'm unsure of which insert to fit. I'm kinda erring towards the flat one.

Cheers,

Mark.

@stevehnz very kindly sent me a photo of 464 Squadron Mossie's lined up with the starboard side facing the camera. I caaaaaan't quite tell from the photo, though, but I thiiiiiiiiiiink that it was bulged. 

 

DSCF3279

 

This photo is in late '44, and the below is in August, which suggests at some point 464 actually extended the height of their invasion stripes, or that someone considers July "late" for purposes of the calendar, which would be weird.

 

 

EC+169+Mosquito+Mosquito+FB+Mk.+VI+SB-V+

 

 

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The third aircraft in that line appears to have a shorter black stripe and squadron codes still at least partially visible. In other words, just 'cos one pic shows one aircraft with stripes all the way around, at one particular moment, doesn't mean they all did. I'm sure they weren't all painted at the same time or by the same crew! I would certainly agree with your comment that the stripes were extended later - no-one would suggest that the codes and camo were repainted over the stripes!

 

Ian

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8 hours ago, Heather Kay said:


Now to wean yourself off the sugar. I did it in my 20s by steadily lowering the amount until one day I wasn’t putting any in my hot drinks at all. Nigh on forty years later my Dad still forgets and heaves sugar in! 

Good point.  In my twenties my then girlfriend got me down to one spoon in tea, then I idly started reading my flatmate's copy of "Pure, White &Deadly" and by page 7 I had renounced sugar in tea and coffee.  That's lasted 30 or so years, with the odd sugary tea made on building sites where they forgot what I asked for and it's bad form to complain!

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