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Need DeWoitine D.520 questions answered.


Corsairfoxfouruncle
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     Im currently building the Buff/Chamois colored D.520 seen in Lebanon in 1942. Actually there were two aircraft, #’s 302 & 397. While studying the photo’s of the two buff/Chamois colored aircraft seen in Lebanon. One (302) definitely has a broad stripe on top of the port wing. I am assuming its some sort of ID stripe as it wouldn't make much sense to camouflage these like this then add a single wide stripe to one or both wing tops ? Im not sure I can post the open photo’s. So if someone needs/wants to double check/verify my thoughts I will send the photos via D/M. Did the French have/use theater I.D. Bands on top of the wings post Vichy use ? Or were these actually camouflaged and we’ve been wrong all these years ? Please if anyone can help it would be most gratefully acknowledged. 
 

Dennis

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IMHO? I don't think that these airplane were painted in chamois color. This color exist in M2 category(metal interior surfaces) only and used for hidden areas non exposed to atmospheric corrosion agents as cargo compartment, rear fuselage. In D520, the entire piot's compartment was primed with chamois paint then finished with a coat of medium blue grey(early ac) or night blue(late ac) M1 category(for metal external area)
Thz idea of use chamois paint for desert camouflage on exterior surfaces is pleasant but I'am not sure  of this choice for these reasons.

at this period, the ac used as liaison ac was painted overall in aluminium, compare this photo and the D520 DC entire bare metal .

The underwing reflects the shadow on the ground so it seems paint in dark color.

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The chamois is a very light shade, the contrast with the white is low.

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Thank you, yes I agree on the underside color. Im more concerned about the visible stripe on top of the wing. In the port side photo you have included it is visible. Now if this plane is in aluminum that might explain an Anti-dazzle/glare strip on the upper wing surface. There was an article from 2001 I read on this aircraft. It contained quote’s from a Mechanic (Denis Larrivet) that supposed to have serviced said aircraft. He described the color as Buff/sand/Chamois so that is why my reasons behind the color choice. Though I am still open to change. I have also read other accounts that back your aluminum. Even one that says its overall light blue so no one is 100% sure.
 

Dennis

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle
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Hi, I am not expert of French camouflages but I would say that the photo doesn't look silver to my eye. The evident reflections under the wing and tail show only that the lower painting was glossy. I think to see a color division line on the rear of the fuselage that looks too sharp and bended to be a shadow. 

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Hi

    have you tried a post here ? 

 

http://www.aerostories.org/~aeroforums/forumhist/

 

  i have used it in the past, they are very helpful

 

   I just post in french first, ( courtesy as it is a french site )

      followed by the post again in english

 it saves any confusion as to what info you are requesting

 

  you can always use an online translator to convert your post to french  if needs be

 

    cheers

       jerry

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the skin of d520 was made of duralumin sheet, it is not so shiny as alclad sheet which have pure aluminium on both side )alclad could be high polished). The render of these two material is different.
the delimitation at the bottom of rear fuselage would be due to the overlapped joint at the botton and the discontynuity of the curvature.
About the dark stripe on the wing, may be it is a amovible pad  walkway;

 

Chamois and Light blue grey do not exist in gloss paint but matt only at this period;

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