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How are the mighty fallen! - British Mk. V Tank - FINISHED, COMPLETED AND DONE!


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Grandad, the Belgian peasant, has been painted. He's a bit sketchy but in real size, not too bad. It's the best I can do with such a flawed moulding and only one eye functioning properly, so he'll just have to do. I picked him as the first one because he's the hardest, so the soldiers should be better...

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Remember that rubbish oil painting on Tommy #1? He's now repainted in a mixture of acrylics and enamels. I think it's an improvement, but not as much as I wanted. Never mind, there are another four soldiers left to paint and by the time I've done the last one I might be approaching a reasonable standard. 🙂 The next diorama will be easier perhaps?

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What I have been doing is simply playing  with my models and my acrylic paint, oil paint, acrylic inks, enamel paints and different brushes and methods of application, washing, dry brush, wet blends, glazes.

 

I watched so many YouTube demonstrations of different people’s methods that I completely confused myself about what to do and in which order. I don’t like being confused, it makes me anxious and likely to avoid doing anything at all.

 

So instead of constantly researching methods and over-thinking everything I’m now just doing it ‘my way’ 🎶 and enjoying myself again. 
 

It’s the same story with the tank and base elements and if it looks a bit odd at the finish, at least it’s going to be MY odd. 
 

 

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34 minutes ago, Bertie Psmith said:

I watched so many YouTube demonstrations of different people’s methods that I completely confused myself about what to do and in which order. I don’t like being confused, it makes me anxious and likely to avoid doing anything at all.

 

I must confess that I suffer in the same way. I call it analysis paralysis

 

Your figures look good, better than my feeble attempts. I think I will just need to give myself a big kick in the butt and just get on with having a go at some figures again.

 

cheers, Graham

 

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1 hour ago, ColonelKrypton said:

I call it analysis paralysis

 

 I think I will just need to give myself a big kick in the butt and just get on with having a go at some figures again.

 

cheers, Graham

 

I'm going to take the liberty of analysing that sentence of yours. Count how many clauses there are that don't lead to you producing some figures.

 

"I think..." "I will just need to..." "give myself a big kick..." "just get on..." Having a go at..."

 

Try saying "I will build and paint X figures by the end of Y" (inserting your own number and time limit), and you might find you don't need all that self-kicking. If it doesn't seem to be working, say it louder, stand up and say it with conviction! 

 

BTW, I always find it easier to tell other people how to motivate themselves than to listen to the things I say. 🙄 So, to follow my own advice for once, "I, BERTIE, WILL PAINT THE FOUR REMAINING HEADS AND ASSEMBLE THE SOLDIERS BEFORE MIDNIGHT TONIGHT (and post a photo to prove it)!"

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, ColonelKrypton said:

analysis paralysis.

 

I have not only been suffering from the paralysis of analysis but by foolishly assembling the soldiers' equipment to their torsos before painting it, I also fell victim to the attraction of action, and made the painting a lot more complicated. There are hazards at both ends of this spectrum, thinking too much or not enough! As the great philosopher William Joel said:

 

"I don't know why I go to extremes; too high or too low there ain't no in-betweens, and if I stand or I fall, it's all or nothing at all."

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Bertie Psmith said:

 

I have not only been suffering from the paralysis of analysis but by foolishly assembling the soldiers' equipment to their torsos before painting it, I also fell victim to the attraction of action, and made the painting a lot more complicated. There are hazards at both ends of this spectrum, thinking too much or not enough! As the great philosopher William Joel said:

 

"I don't know why I go to extremes; too high or too low there ain't no in-betweens, and if I stand or I fall, it's all or nothing at all."

 

 

Sounds very familiar!

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1 hour ago, Bertie Psmith said:

Try saying "I will build and paint X figures by the end of Y" (inserting your own number and time limit), and you might find you don't need all that self-kicking. If it doesn't seem to be working, say it louder, stand up and say it with conviction! 

 

Indeed.  Just this morning I have already assembled and primed some unused figures from a Tamiya armour kit.

 

cheers, Graham

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2 hours ago, ColonelKrypton said:

Indeed.  Just this morning I have already assembled and primed some unused figures from a Tamiya armour kit.

 

Yay! Well done!!

🙌 🙌 🙌 🙌 🙌 🙌 

 

What colour primer, just out of interest?

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1 hour ago, ColonelKrypton said:

Alclad black micro primer with a mist of Tamiya Fine white surface sprayed downwards from overhead to show the highlights. 

 

The figures are a couple of WWII German armour types.

 

cheers, Graham

 

 

I've never used that. Do you get a good opaque white?

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The Tamiya Fine White primer has good coverage and is similar to Mr. Surfacer 1200 White primer. I keep a spray can of it handy for quick and simple jobs.

 

These are both lacquer based primers but I think any good acrylic would work just as well.  

 

I will be using acrylics once I start filling in the details.

 

The idea, or so I see in various Youtube videos, is to spray a light dusting from directly above or slightly off to one side so as to make those areas more prominent which should be your highlights. I have never tried this before but it seems as though it might help me better visualize the figure.

 

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

 

cheers, Graham 

 

 

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Well, they are done at least. There will be some touch ups needed and they will have to be weathered in accordance with the landscape, but they are done. They aren't very good, but they are close enough to human to make me laugh at their facial expressions, so I'm going to call that a win. Another win is the fact that they were getting easier and I was enjoying them, while learning.

 

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"Right lads, you four are the idiots that wanted to transfer to the tanks "...because it's safer, Sir"."

 

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"Now take a good hard look at the blood and guts in there and ask yourselves whether you don't think being able to duck is better that a half inch of dodgy armour and the WHOLE BLOODY GERMAN ARMY AIMING AT YOU!"

 

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"If you still want to transfer, I'll sign your applications, but remember, I've kept you alive for the last three years, haven't I?"

 

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"Er. Um. Mutter. Mumble. Whose idea was it to transfer, then? I always said it was well dodgy, innit!"

 

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#1 is Ronnie Barker (horrified, frowning)

#2 is Winsor Davies (surprised, denying all responsibility)

#3 is really blank faced (needs eyes, though I didn't think it was either possible or desirable until now.*)

#4 is Private Pike (Holding his rifle in a very non-businesslike way. Stupid boy!)

 

And it's only a quarter to nine. I can barely see to type but I achieved my goal!

 

 

 

* I still say it's unrealistic to have eyes in this scale but I kinda like the comic and character effect despite that. Enjoyment and drama always trump realism in my game.

 

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11 minutes ago, ColonelKrypton said:

The Tamiya Fine White primer has good coverage and is similar to Mr. Surfacer 1200 White primer. I keep a spray can of it handy for quick and simple jobs.

 

These are both lacquer based primers but I think any good acrylic would work just as well.  

 

I will be using acrylics once I start filling in the details.

 

The idea, or so I see in various Youtube videos, is to spray a light dusting from directly above or slightly off to one side so as to make those areas more prominent which should be your highlights. I have never tried this before but it seems as though it might help me better visualize the figure.

 

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

 

cheers, Graham 

 

 

 

Yes, I used that zenithal priming technique and found it helped not only by showing me where the shadows went, but acted as a pre-shading under thin acrylics and more or less put the shadows in for me. Except when my paint was put on too thick!

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  • Bertie McBoatface changed the title to How are the mighty fallen! - British Mk. V Tank - Going to Ground
1 hour ago, Pig of the Week said:

Those figures are spot on, the subdued colours and textures are perfect imho, I honestly don't think you could better them 👍

 

Thanks for your first sentence, I am rather pleased with the outcome myself.

 

If I thought that I couldn't do better though, I'd be dismayed "Seven out of ten (could do better)" is my considered judgement, where each increase on number is a doubling of quality. There has to be room for improvement or what's the point of the hobby? One might as well take up jigsaw puzzles where every finish is a perfect one.

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55 minutes ago, echen said:

I sense the superlative adjectives queuing up here.

 

Indeed. Whatever happened to the art of British understatement? I remember when you had to work really hard for a quiet, "Well done" and it meant something. Last century, I rode Donnington Park Racetrack on a motorbike training day and through sheer good luck, did two laps with Rocket Ron Haslam himself, just he and I. I was terrified but figured that I should trust him and just follow close despite my fear. We went faster round the corners than I believed possible, the bike laying so far down! He was sitting up on his machine, looking backwards half the time, so comfortable with the (to him) snail's pace that he could easily have been drinking a cup of coffee. At the end, had he said I was 'brilliant' or 'outstanding' I'd have known it instantly for meaningless bullshine. Thankfully, Rocket Ron muttered "Hm, you were starting to get on the pace at the end there" and wandered off looking bored, leaving me glowing with 'earned' pride to this day.

 

I'm as guilty as anyone, awarding 'outstanding' and 'brilliant' to any old tat in the RFI section. When did it happen, this addiction to hyperbolic superlatives? That's a rhetorical question, by the by, as any attempt to answer it would inevitably lead us into the forbidden land of politics, and waaaaaay of the topic of this diorama!

 

 

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