Jump to content

Supermarine Twin Spitfire FB.III - 3rd conversion


Recommended Posts

Here is the third kit of my Twin Spitfire 3-kit project:

 

0397-01.jpg

 

Supermarine Twin Spitfire FB.III
"M" of RAF No 135 Sqn based in India in November 1945.
Once the Twin Spitfire had entered service in the fighter and reconnaissance roles, its use for attack was tested and the results were promising. With the need to replace the P-47s in SEAC with something with more speed and punch, the FB.III was quickly developed. Since the emphasis was in low-level performance, the wings were clipped and the central tailplane replaced by standard Spitfire tailplanes on the inside. By now the twin cockpit layout had become definite. Most of the sub-type's production was sent to India and they started entering service in early October 1945. Even with a full load of two drop tanks and four bombs, the FB.III was much faster and more agile than the P-47 it replaced and delivered a considerable punch in fast attack missions, acquitting itself quite well against the latest Japanese fighters in the theatre. In fact, the impact of the type was such that the Japanese sent some of their very latest fighter designs to the theatre and although a couple were indeed superior, there were too few of them and losses inflicted on the Twin Spitfire were fortunately much less than they could have been.

 

For more general information of this project please see the first post (if you haven't already):

 

It's a conversion using two Mark I Models 1:144 Spitfire XIV/XVIIIs and adding the central main wing only in this case and, unlike the other two, leaving the standard tailplanes. Otherwise the build was mostly OOB.

This time I also decided to make it with clipped wings. The only Allied WW2 bombs I had available in this scale were in Platz P-47 kits so I pinched them from there as well as the outer pylons.

The other pylons were scratchbuilt. I made the torpedo-type drop tanks similar to those actually use by Spitfires from the kits' sprues. As with the other two, the whip antennae and the underwing pitot were added from stretched sprue.

The kit was fully painted and varnished with brush. I used the decals from the Mark I kits.

 

0397-02.jpg
0397-03.jpg
0397-05.jpg
0397-07.jpg
0397-11.jpg
0397-10.jpg
0397-13.jpg
0397-14.jpg
0397-17.jpg
0397-16.jpg
0397-18.jpg

 

Thanks for looking and, as usual, all comments are welcome

Miguel

 

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting idea. Given the speed of the late model single engine Spitfires. A twin engine version would rival the jets for speed. 

It's a pity the real thing was never built. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, noelh said:

Interesting idea. Given the speed of the late model single engine Spitfires. A twin engine version would rival the jets for speed. 

It's a pity the real thing was never built. 

 

15 hours ago, HOUSTON said:

OUTSTANDING  and SUPERB build.

:wow:

 

KUDOS.

:worthy:

 

14 hours ago, bigbadbadge said:

This looks an interesting project, great  job on this, it looks fab.

Chris

 

Thank you very much!

Miguel

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really like that one Miguel. Another fabulously unique project that has turned out superbly. I think i prefer the look of this one with 2 canopies .....looking rather like a British equivalent of the F-82 Twin Mustang. It really suits the later Spitfire shape rather well. Shame it was never manufactured for real 😁

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, binbrook87 said:

I really like that one Miguel. Another fabulously unique project that has turned out superbly. I think i prefer the look of this one with 2 canopies .....looking rather like a British equivalent of the F-82 Twin Mustang. It really suits the later Spitfire shape rather well. Shame it was never manufactured for real 😁

 

I agree! Thanks a lot.

 

20 hours ago, Wulfman said:

Another lovely whif, a great concept !

 

Wulfman

 

Many thanks!

 

Miguel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...