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Polska Skrzydła Husaria


Cadman
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I'd have to be a warrior, a slave I couldn't be,
A soldier and a conqueror, fighting to be free.

 

Figures are 54mm white metal. Banners and flags pad-printed onto resin sub-bases.

Photo backdrops from the internet.

Quoted lyrics from "Warrior" by Wishbone Ash. 

 

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Edited by Cadman
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4 hours ago, stevehnz said:

Those are stunning, they make me want to know the rest of the story. :)

Steve.

 

Hmm, well that's a bit of a problem as I was recently made aware that posing links to the slideshows on my YT channel is prohibited, although putting the link in my signature is okay.

 

As I think you're aware Steve, I've built a considerable amount of small dioramas and vignettes down the years. The solution to our house being overrun with this stuff was to give the wife's Old Uncle Ho a few dioramas -- and he's put them on display behind the reception area of the 2-star hotel he built on his spread around 6 miles outside of town -- to general "Ooh's and Aah's" from his clientele, or so I'm told. I also gave a few to the Son-in-Law who had been bugging the life out of me for some of them so he could "show them off" to visitors turning up at his place -- who have "never seen anything like it", apparently.

So I came up with the idea of creating slideshows that were intended to provide me with a semi-permanent record of the stuff I've done and in several cases, given away. I then had the further "good idea" of sharing them around by uploading them to YT, where I knew they'd be de-monetized due to the embedded audio tracks. But that's okay as I get enough hassle from Customs Officials questioning my motives every single time I try to import kit figures, without also having to explain why I'm receiving what would likely be pittance payments from YT -- when it's blocked nationwide by my ISP. Incidentally, the same ISP also blocks this forum as per official policy. It's an easy enough fix most of the time, but it's probably wise not to go into too much detail here.

 

Unfortunately, the Polish Winged Hussars slideshow was one of the first examples I did -- and it shows. What I didn't know at the time was the Nikon DSLR/Lens combination I used gives poor close-up video results -- in fact I get better quality MP4's from my Oppo R17 phone these days, (go figure). In addition, it took a while before it gradually dawned that watching figures filmed on a turntable is about as interesting as watching a goldfish swimming around and around. So that particular Winged Hussar slideshow on my channel definitely needs to be re-done using all the lessons learned.   

It struck me today that converting the original slideshow to Black & White and introducing a bit of video "noise" as per Harry Enfield's scandalously non-PC comedy sketches featuring Mr. Cholmondley-Warner, appeals to my sense of humor. Now that would be pretty funny and save me deleting something I spent a fair bit of time on, way back when. If you don't know what I'm blethering about, then just do a search on YouTube for "harry enfield mr cholmondley warner".

 

Anyhoo, getting back to the Hussars, here's a series of screenshots I took from the slideshow this afternoon that explain the story I was trying to tell. You'll just have to imagine the Wishbone ash audio tracks I embedded into the MP4 -- which might, or might not, be an advantage depending on individual musical tastes. Obviously the quality of the screenshots isn't great, but it is what it is -- for now.

 

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Good job showing a piece of Polish history.

Just for information - these figures present late formation outlook. Not to be seen on the fields of Kircholm. This early XVIIth century Swedish war was top time for hussars. The unit reached, or saying better, continued to present the best combat quality. A long story about people, horses and armour. From that time it was only downhill for them, although they  still had some moments of glory even late in XVIIth. The modernising battlefield made them obsolete and hundred years later hussars sadly finished being laughed at as 'funeral knights'. With military value lost and forgotten, and looking more glamorous then ever before, they assisted official celebrations - personage funerals being on top of the list.

Still, XVIth and XVIIth century was the time of their glory and hoofs of noble horses usually drummed the  victory march for winged knights on the battlegrounds of that age.

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3 minutes ago, greatgonzo said:

Good job showing a piece of Polish history.

Just for information - these figures present late formation outlook. Not to be seen on the fields of Kircholm. This early XVIIth century Swedish war was top time for hussars. The unit reached, or saying better, continued to present the best combat quality. A long story about people, horses and armour. From that time it was only downhill for them, although they  still had some moments of glory even late in XVIIth. The modernising battlefield made them obsolete and hundred years later hussars sadly finished being laughed at as 'funeral knights'. With military value lost and forgotten, and looking more glamorous then ever before, they assisted official celebrations - personage funerals being on top of the list.

Still, XVIth and XVIIth century was the time of their glory and hoofs of noble horses usually drummed the  victory march for winged knights on the battlegrounds of that age.

 

I'm aware they're not strictly accurate for Kircholm, but I don't consider that as too important and it doesn't bother me too much. After all, who but an expert such as yourself would know? I'm not even convinced the wings were kept in place during combat operations -- and as for the idea put forward by some historians that the wind rustling through those feathers induced fear in their opponents; that sounds a bit like clutching at straws to me...😉
I just wanted to do something different from the all-too-often-covered "Relief of Vienna"...🙂...although I did think it deserved a mention in the slideshow I created. Given that's about all the average guy knows about these elite units, you would think charging the Ottoman's was all they ever did. Personally speaking, I blame Sabaton...😆

 

 

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14 minutes ago, greatgonzo said:

Oh, You shouldn't be bothered at all. As said before - good job done. I just added a little bit information for curious ones :).

 

Sorry mate -- I was being ever so slightly satirical, which is why I inserted all those "Emoji's".

Your additional information is more than welcome and I'm sure it'll prove useful for those who would like to know that bit more about these iconic cavalry units.

Incidentally, here's quite a good Wikipedia article I'd recommend for anyone who's curious.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_hussars

Edited by Cadman
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5 hours ago, greatgonzo said:

Cool with me. Is and was :).

 

No worries mate.

There's been occasions when I've had to correct people myself, albeit usually in the pub, when they try to tell me the last pitch battle on British soil was Culloden 1746, but that's an oft-repeated fallacy. The last pitch battle was actually at Hampden Park Glasgow in 1980, and the combat that day featured cavalry charges as well. I should know -- I was there, although I won't reveal which side I was on...😉

Check it out; just plug "Rangers vs Celtic 1980" into a YouTube search.

😮...😆

Being serious though, it's a great opportunity to have a chat with someone who knows far more about Polish history than I ever will. It's a subject I find utterly fascinating.

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