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New Smoke/Heat Alarms Ruling (Scotland)


FrankJ
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I don't know about South of the border but apparently a new ruling on smoke/heat alarms comes into force in Scotland February 2022. Interlinked alarms to be fitted in houses, not just new builds. 

 

Wondering if anyone has them fitted in the same room/workstation where you build & paint your models where there maybe lots of paint, thinners & other chemicals are stored. 

 

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One of mine is fitted on the landing right outside my modelling room and I've never had any problems with it being set off by my hobby stuff. I know they are sensitive though because a farmer 2 miles upwind of us was burning some stuff and the smoke from that was setting the alarms off!

 

Duncan B

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As above.

 

My landing smoke alarm is 18" from my modelling den door that cannot close properly. In 12 years despite my best efforts at air pollution caused by my modelling, I have never set the alarm off. Burnt toast downstairs is a different matter!

 

Dave

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I have one in my modelling room - nearly directly above the spray booth. With all the nasties in this room, I want the earliest possible warning! It's never gone off (just tested it to make sure it's actually working :))

 

Cheers

 

Colin

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Unless paint and thinners start spontaneously combusting (which they don't), I would imagine everyone's going to be alright.  Unless they leave their stuff near a naked flame or something electrical, and faulty, plugged in when they're not around...

 

The trick is not to spray smoke around...

Edited by RobL
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My understanding- no doubt imperfect as usual - is that the monitors are checking for particles in the air from smoke. So normal modelling shouldn’t set them off. If spraying or working with resin there are other health issues though 

 

Its still a good idea to upgrade or install from new

 

Also landlords letting out property have to have them interlinked and hardwired in to stop tenants removing batteries !

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On 8/28/2021 at 5:15 PM, Julien said:

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This link doesn't work.

 

Regards the original post, I found this:  "The new standard applies to all homes .  .  .  It will be the property owner’s responsibility to meet the new standard, however, the legal duty to enforce the standard rests with local authorities. Where owners are unable to meet the standard, it is not a criminal offence."  That sounds to me like a laborious job for councils, so it wouldn't surprise me if there's low compliance for a long time.

 

Edited by 3DStewart
Extra info.
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Sounds like it will be a very expensive change for a lot of people, with the number of buildings requiring changes electricians and alarm retailers will be quids in.

 

Cheers

 

Dennis

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On 9/1/2021 at 2:40 PM, 3DStewart said:

This link doesn't work.

 

Regards the original post, I found this:  "The new standard applies to all homes .  .  .  It will be the property owner’s responsibility to meet the new standard, however, the legal duty to enforce the standard rests with local authorities. Where owners are unable to meet the standard, it is not a criminal offence."  That sounds to me like a laborious job for councils, so it wouldn't surprise me if there's low compliance for a long time.

 

In all likelihood in most domestic properties they won't get changed until the originals need replacing or until the property goes up for sale as it'll be flagged up on the home report. I changed mine out a couple of years ago so won't be changing them again before February unless someone else is paying! I have no problem with meeting the new standard when the time comes to change them out as it seems like a reasonable standard to set.

 

Duncan B

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I didn't realise you can get interlinked wireless alarms, makes sense really and can be installed without any wiring needed.

 

Had a quick look on Amazon and no-one is currently offering a 'Scottish box' with the minimum mandated three smoke, a heat and CO alarm, but I suspect these will be available pretty soon.

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I have no objection at all to this change. It seems pretty reasonable. I currently have one smoke alarm which is in the hallway.

I live in a council flat so doubtless  my local authority will be contacting us shortly regarding the upgrade /installation.

At least I won't have to worry about the cost of buying them and, the cost of installing them.

Probably put the rent up instead next year!!

 

John

 

Edited by Beermonster1958
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I've an interconnected smoke alarm in my bedroom and kitchen area. Was installed by landlords free of charge. Previous one was hardwired into the ceiling of my unit, which is a 10 inch concrete slab. The tenants above me sound like fairy elephants at times 🤝:elephant:

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  • 2 weeks later...

When they say "interconnected" does that include the Google Nest smoke/carbon monoxide alarms?  Not cheap, but they'd do for an existing property because you don't need any wires. :hmmm:

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