Jump to content

Getting started on armor after a long pause (Lindberg M-46)


flyinghorse
 Share

Recommended Posts

After a pause in building large scale tanks, I decided to get started on something simple. I purchased the two set M-46/USS Missouri kits from Lindberg and so far its been okay, nothing super detailed or accurate but a decent experience thus far. I was looking for reference on the M-46 Patton and noticed many Korean War era photos of the M-46 lacking side skirts. The Lindberg kit has side skirts on it, but I am trying to get mine to look like a Korean War era tank, but I have yet to see any pictures of these tanks with side skirts on them. Most tanks seemed to have done away with the skirts it seems, so what tips are there to effectively remove the molded on skirts on this kit. Thanks for any hints.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only ways I can think of are cut them or sand them off (probably a bit of both)!

If you can get underneath try repeatedly running a sharp blade (or thin razor saw https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/AEM040?result-token=RMpvx for example. I'd use the one with the round end)  along where the skirt joins the track guard keeping the knife as vertical as possible until you see a white line appearing along the top of the guard that means your nearly through so be extra careful. when they're off sand back as necessary to tidy it up. 

Depending on how detail conscious you are you'll have to apply some detail to the cut edge. 

And take your time.

Tom

Edited by Modelholic
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Modelholic said:

The only ways I can think of are cut them or sand them off (probably a bit of both)!

If you can get underneath try repeatedly running a sharp blade (or thin razor saw https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/AEM040?result-token=RMpvx for example. I'd use the one with the round end)  along where the skirt joins the track guard keeping the knife as vertical as possible until you see a white line appearing along the top of the guard that means your nearly through so be extra careful. when they're off sand back as necessary to tidy it up. 

Depending on how detail conscious you are you'll have to apply some detail to the cut edge. 

And take your time.

Tom

Thanks, I'll try it out :D

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know you're only just getting started but you haven't exactly chosen an easy route in.  That is a very, very old kit and is stone age by modern standards in terms of fit, detail and general quality.  It could put you off for good!

 

If you really want a Korean War M46 then one of the other brands would be a far better option, if more expensive.  Dragon is the old standard and Meng are the new pretenders.

 

If you want a relatively easy build without a million small parts then you can't go wrong with a Tamiya kit.  They don't do an M46 but they have a nice M26, also used in Korea.  Same tank, different engine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Das Abteilung said:

I know you're only just getting started but you haven't exactly chosen an easy route in.  That is a very, very old kit and is stone age by modern standards in terms of fit, detail and general quality.  It could put you off for good!

 

If you really want a Korean War M46 then one of the other brands would be a far better option, if more expensive.  Dragon is the old standard and Meng are the new pretenders.

 

If you want a relatively easy build without a million small parts then you can't go wrong with a Tamiya kit.  They don't do an M46 but they have a nice M26, also used in Korea.  Same tank, different engine.

I had no idea the M46's only difference to the M26 was the engine. That's news to me. Thanks for the info on alternatives as well, I'll look into them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There were other more minor improvements and differences but yes, the M46 was essentially an M26 with the Ford GAF V8 replaced with a Continental V12 with about 50% more BHP.  The M26 was notably underpowered with the GAF, basically the same 500BHP engine as powered the M4A3 Sherman.  Fine at 32 tons but not so at 46 tons.  Surviving M26 are rare because many were actually converted to M46.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...