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12 hours ago, beefy66 said:

 

Yes I know that feeling but it looks like you are progressing along at quite a pace there Jamie.  👍

 

Stay Safe

beefy

 

I need to pace myself as I'm prone to burnout - but hopefully I can keep a steady momentum up. I need some discipline!

 

6 hours ago, Adm Lord De Univers said:

Quite a pace already indeed! I particularly like that I've now got a podcast, several links, and this log to help me improve! So thank you. Anyone here suggested installing hangar lighting yet?

 

I don't have a problem with battle damage either, but I think there is a question of taste. Where that falls is entirely up to the modeller - it's their art after all (and art of warfare). I've seen amazing tank dioramas with gruesome detail, but conversely wouldn't myself model 1/700 sailors strewn about the decks (although sometimes their feet do seem to naturally fall off). I know from a few interviews that US sailors were quite proud of their damage fighting prowess too, so the above seems a very fitting tribute.

 

David

 

Ps. Seems to me like you might be able to get close to that splinter damage photo with a toothbrush flicking paint instead of layers of paint/chipping medium approach?

 

I agree I don't want models of dead and injured people lying about or anything like that. I'm thinking if I do this I'll model the ship after the Val divebomber attack had been cleaned up and either just after or some time after the Kate torpedo attack. The wreck shows some significant plating damage on the side above the boot topping, but the ship listed fairly quickly to 20 degrees then slowed but continued to list to 26 degrees before Captain Buckmaster conceded the situation and word was passed to abandon ship, and the photographs of Yorktown abandoned all place this plating damage well below the surface due to the list. I certainly don't want to model many figures but accept I may need some. After abandonment may be the simplest solution.

 

6 hours ago, ArnoldAmbrose said:

Gidday Jamie, it's good to see you using correct naval terminology. 😁 Seriously, that idea of David's above with flicking paint with a toothbrush seems an interesting idea. That first photo above of the fire-fighting crews I've seen before but not the other two. Thanks for showing. Regards, Jeff.

 

It's important to use the correct nomenclature in all technical discussion :D

 

6 hours ago, dnl42 said:

I was going to ask if any of the aircraft were triced. The answer is clearly yes!

 

Thanks for sharing the photos.

 

I realised I forgot to actually share the photograph of Tom Cheek's Wildcat. He had shot down three Zekes during the Devastator attacks but his Wildcat was damaged in return. He missed the wires, hit the barrier and his F4F-3 flipped over onto its back. The deck crews lifted the plane onto a dolly and took it down to the hangar deck and left it there. It was still there when the ship was abandoned. This might be the most complete photograph of the big mural painted on the bulkhead also.

 

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If anyone's interested in Tom Cheek's combat and crash landing during the Battle of Midway, you can read it here:

https://www.pacificwar.org.au/.../Tom.../Wildcat_V_Zero.html

 

 

I've just been downstairs to see if I had any useful goodies left over from our 3rd party purge, and luckily I do!

 

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I have a friend and her young daughter here to stay for a couple of nights so I can't paint til tomorrow evening earliest, because it's rude to ignore guests!

 

I did steal the opportunity to fit the rudder and shafts on the starboard side only which, if I choose to use resin, might just about be visible through the dark blue murk I tint it with. I figured it's easier to add them now before final clean-up and painting and if I go the foam route and they're in the way I can remove them again.

 

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The portholes need cleaned out and the degaussing cables need some PVA cleaned off here and there but overall it's not actually that bad.

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3 hours ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

I've started painting the hull. I'm working from the anti-fouling paint upwards towards the top of the hull, so the first colour I've laid down is a fleshy tone upon which I'll work up the anti-fouling.

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Really keen to see the outcome on this one as I'm coveting a carrier at the moment,

 

Forgove my ignorance but why is it your starting with a flesh tone for the anti fouling base?

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27 minutes ago, S-boat 55 said:

Really keen to see the outcome on this one as I'm coveting a carrier at the moment,

 

Forgove my ignorance but why is it your starting with a flesh tone for the anti fouling base?

 

It's just the first layer upon which I'll build up in several coats blending towards Norfolk 65A anti-fouling red. When well worn it looks kinda fleshy.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Pennsylvania_(BB-38)#/media/File:USS_Pennsylvania_(BB-38)_drydocked_in_an_Advanced_Base_Sectional_Dock_at_the_Pacific_c1944.jpg

 

As we can see in the photographs of USS Yorktown in drydock between the Battle of Coral Sea and Midway, the anti-fouling is worn in places. Salt weathering will work quite well for most of this with a little blending between with a brush damp with thinners.

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/USS_Yorktown_(CV-5)_in_a_dry_dock_at_the_Pearl_Harbor_Naval_Shipyard%2C_29_May_1942_(80-G-13065).jpg

 

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

 

It's just the first layer upon which I'll build up in several coats blending towards Norfolk 65A anti-fouling red. When well worn it looks kinda fleshy.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Pennsylvania_(BB-38)#/media/File:USS_Pennsylvania_(BB-38)_drydocked_in_an_Advanced_Base_Sectional_Dock_at_the_Pacific_c1944.jpg

 

As we can see in the photographs of USS Yorktown in drydock between the Battle of Coral Sea and Midway, the anti-fouling is worn in places. Salt weathering will work quite well for most of this with a little blending between with a brush damp with thinners.

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/USS_Yorktown_(CV-5)_in_a_dry_dock_at_the_Pearl_Harbor_Naval_Shipyard%2C_29_May_1942_(80-G-13065).jpg

 

 

 

 

I see what you mean in those photos, it's certainly fleshy tone as you say, thanks for the info, 

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Just as I was starting to enjoy myself work has embusied m. That is a word. No need to fact check me...

 

I've sneaked away this morning and applied a coat of Alclad Aquagloss over the fleshy tone. Work will mitigate my general impatience here but I'll try to get some salt applied and left to dry later today, then I can get to the more interesting stuff.

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Today was another work day but @Stew Dapple was here so it didn't seem so bad. Last night I had the foresight to apply some salt. The granules were bigger than the stuff I prefer but hey ho - most of this will be submerged anyway.

 

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This was lightly overpainted with my US14 Norfolk 65A anti-fouling red by airbrush before collecting Stew.

 

Tonight after the work was done and I sat on the sofa for a bit, I mixed some heavily thinned blends of the fleshy tone and the red to work in some fading and streaking similar to that in the drydock photograph - or at least that was the intent.

 

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By now the light is fading outside so the photo afterwards is a bit dim under artificial light.

 

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I'm going to leave this overnight to dry off then tomorrow morning before collecting Stew again I'll airbrush on another barrier coat of Aquagloss. The boot topping is next, and I expect that to be more difficult to paint well.

 

 

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Gidday Jamie, I don't do weathering myself because I don't think I could do it well enough, plus I paint with the hairy stick. Your job here is looking very good though.

    I was rather interested in you paint trays. 🙂 Regards, Jeff.

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Thanks everyone Stew and I have motored through around 18 litres of paint this weekend which has used up all the time and energy. I did look at the hull again this morning and had one of those childhood moments where the next time you see something it looks nowhere near as good as you remember it.

 

That's a long way of saying "this morning it looked rubbish", so I'm going to do more work on the red before moving on.

 

 

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Bloody work etc.

 

This is the first time I've had a chance to get at the ship again since the other week. I've masked both sides but decided to practise the boot topping on the port side which will be submerged, reasoning that it didn't matter so much. I've painted it with black oil paint. Criticism is welcome, and I'd prefer any prior to trying the starboard side which will be visible :lol:

 

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I hope this hasn't become too tedious for everyone else but I've been enjoying myself playing with oil paints and enamels with carefree abandon over the Colourcoats anti-fouling paints safely tucked under a layer of Alclad Aquagloss which I'd allowed a full day to cure before attacking with enamel thinners. I've added white enamel to the boot topping with a stippling brush, then softened the stipples with thinners. This gave a nice effect but over softened the top and bottom of the boot topping which can be seen to be reasonably intact on the drydock photos. I still had some black oil on my cardboard which once the top of the blob was scraped off was still wet(ish) underneath. This was just perfect for brushing back in along the top and bottom of the masking which I reapplied. I think I'm content with this now, so shall take this method over to the starboard side now and try to do a good job there as that's the one which will be Sunny Side Up for all to see.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've mostly been day-jobbing and car-maintaining but I finished the 5-S Sea Blue today including the fading effect evident in photographs which I think is either chalking or just plain old salt, which I applied using the salt chipping technique again. This time I ground the salt down in the mortar & pestle from the kitchen :D

 

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It's time to remask then apply 5-O Ocean Gray from the level of the hangar deck upwards next.

 

 

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On 9/21/2021 at 7:30 PM, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

Oh? Do tell :)

 

 My mistake should have said Gearing not Daring.  :facepalm: getting to old and tired only 638 days till I can have a rest.

Well I do have this from Dragon USS Frank Knox and will give this paint method a go when I get round to it you know how it is just to many other things on the go.  :whistle:

 

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Stay Safe

beefy

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