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Airfix Tiger I Tank


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Now as we all know, the nazi tiger tank was probably the greatest tank built in WW2. Here is probably my best build yet.

 

Now okay this is just a starter set and yes I am only 13 whilst doing this sort of stuff. But I am happy with it.

 

Great kit overall, and I had a go at some homemade washes using a dark brown and black washes over the details of the tank.

 

Now I did forget to put a Matt varnish layer on before the washes and this did lead to a little peeling of the paint but nothing too severe.
 

Please feel free to suggest any things that I could change or make better as I plan to do another of the same kit soon

 

 Please check out the Link to Flickr images below-

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/193567223@N05/albums/72157719704272992

 

 

 

 

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Hi. Would like to see your model but the link won't open. 

Select image on Flickr, click on download icon, select all sizes, click on preferred image size, right click on image, copy image address, paste in Britmodeller 😉

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Good Tiger. Keep up the good work.

Maybe not so much thinners in the next weathering wash; looks like the paint has lifted in places?

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It's not the lack of varnish but the lack of a primer,you need something for the base coat to adhere to that's why some of the paint has lifted.

Prime

Base coat

Gloss/semi gloss

Weather

Matt varnish

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2 hours ago, jeff72 said:

It's not the lack of varnish but the lack of a primer,you need something for the base coat to adhere to that's why some of the paint has lifted.

Prime

Base coat

Gloss/semi gloss

Weather

Matt varnish

These steps will hold you in good stead @Planes123 👍

 

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4 hours ago, jeff72 said:

It's not the lack of varnish but the lack of a primer,you need something for the base coat to adhere to that's why some of the paint has lifted.

Prime

Base coat

Gloss/semi gloss

Weather

Matt varnish

Agree with the above, but would also add between the gloss/semi gloss and the weather, the decals, and then another coat of varnish to seal them in and protect them from the washes. Keep practicing and you'll get there.

 

John.

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It’s a good start… keep it up. One thing that would also help is using different types of paint for the base coat and wash. Citadel (Warhammer) does a great range of water based washes that are safe over enamels and acrylics, which are ideal for popping moulded detail.

best,

M.

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3 minutes ago, Planes123 said:

Does anyone think that possibly getting a bigger model in 1/35 or 1/48 (Sherman?) might be better to practice on and then scale those techniques down to 1/72?

I think that the choice of scale is down to your personal preference. You’ve made a good start with your Tiger ( they are mean looking machines).

If it were me, I’d practise some more on 1/72 before moving up to a bigger scale. But that’s just my opinion and you’re obviously free to do exactly what you want.

The advice the guys have already given is very sound. I remember when I was your age that I never used to prime my models but it certainly helps the process.

Good luck and keep modelling!

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On the other hand, some fellow Britmodellers don't use primer and still achieve fantastic results.

As a relative newbie to latest techniques I found the video at Painting Acryllic base coats. very informative. 

If you look at Plastix's finished work it is fantastic - just as the work of other Britmodellers who use different techniques work is fantastic.

Us newbies are all on a learning curve to find the techniques that suit us and deliver the results we're looking for.

Happy modelling and technique development.

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I think that's a very decent model. A shame about the reaction with the wash. 

 

I would recommend that you switch to using all acrylics. Vallejo is my "go to" but others may recommend other brands and you can also use cheap "Artist's" acrylic when weathering. By using acrylic (and at least at first) sticking to a single manufacturer you should not have to worry about paint reacting but the other thing to watch for is to make sure you allow your paints to dry AND cure before applying washes.

 

Understand how paints work. Modern paints are made up of pigment, binder and solvent. As a paint dries the solvent evaporates in an acrylic this is water. This leaves the pigment and the binder. The binder is the sticky stuff that makes the pigment stick to whatever it is you have painted. You need this to set too. This is the difference between "touch-dry" and fully cured. Once a paint has cured then most solvents will not attack it (ish). Binders can however take some time to fully cure. This means that if you paint over them before it has fully cured the solvent in your next paint can dissolve the binder in the paint layer beneath and the paint is lifted or mixes with the new layer.

 

There are other advantage to acrylic. No unpleasant smells to upset the domestic authorities. Kinder to your brushes. If you are using sable, squirrel or other naturally derived brushes the oils and solvent in enamel paints will attack the hairs over time and they will lose their "springiness" making the fine tips snap off. 

 

If you decide to prime your models before base coating consider using Artist's Gesso. Cheap as chips and can be applied with a brush. It goes on like gloop but shrinks to form a flexible skin over the model. The other easy alternative is automotive primers such as Halford's in the UK. You just need somewhere you can use the spray can without upsetting people, by their nature aerosols tend to go everywhere so do it outside in warm weather. You can buy modelling specific primers from Games Workshop (and others) but they are expensive and no better than the automotive stuff.

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9 hours ago, Planes123 said:

I am definitely going to be making another one and use these tips to create a better finish.

Maybe a WIP for the next one?

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If you're planning on enamel base and cam with acryllic washes keep the wash mix very thin and add a second layer only after the first is dry and you can see the full effect. The first coat of wash on my Matchbox Jagdpanther had not fully dried and did not look like it had done much so I added a second coat. It REALLY toned down the cam - almost to not being able to see it!

Just a thought............................

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On 8/18/2021 at 8:48 AM, Planes123 said:

Does anyone think that possibly getting a bigger model in 1/35 or 1/48 (Sherman?) might be better to practice on and then scale those techniques down to 1/72?

 

If you do fancy practising on something a bit larger I can recommend Tamiya's 1/35 Panzer II. The old one they did in the 1970s (Kit no. 35009). It's easy and quick to build and seems to be available everywhere for about a tenner. I got one a few years back to do just that, when I was getting back into armour modelling. I still use it to test weathering techniques. 

 

 

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