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HMS Queen Elizabeth 1941 camouflage colors


thekz
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Hello,
I would like to hear your opinion on one of the most beautiful camouflages of the Second World War - the battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth 1941
This is how it looks in an illustration from the book Les Brown

 

26-8680001-041.jpg


And this is how Alen Raven

 

Ensign-04-Queen-Elizabeth-Class-Battlesh
The question is not even about the shape of the paterns - it certainly needs to be clarified. I find the range of colors offered by Les Brown rather strange. Isn't it logical to assume the standard MS1-MS2-MS3-507C set for that time?

The color white seems especially strange to me. Take a look at this photo: you can clearly see the white waterline mark on a “white” background.

 

c0f123bd8f6d3657696e8f4745962a56.jpg

 

In short, I will be very glad to all well-reasoned opinions on this matter.

Especially interesting is the opinion by @Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies

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You're correct - the background paint colour very clearly isn't white. This is one of those messy 1941 designs. My imagination might be playing tricks on me but I keep visualising a still from a colour cinefilm with a glimpse of HMS Queen Elizabeth wearing this scheme in it, but I've no idea where I might have seen it. I'd like to tag @dickrd in this. The first step is to verify the placement of colour demarcations then agree how many different tones of paint are actually there. Whilst it may seem secondary, we have to know how many paints are there and grade each paint in order of its tone relative to its neighbours. That process can narrow down likely candidates for the paint.

 

I really need HMS Queen Elizabeth as a vector drawing for this - I don't really have time to draw it at the moment unfortunately but could certainly play with paint colours on it if I had it.

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33 minutes ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

I really need HMS Queen Elizabeth as a vector drawing for this - I don't really have time to draw it at the moment unfortunately but could certainly play with paint colours on it if I had it.

I have such pictures

25-3626089-hms-queen-elizabeth.jpg

 

26-8680001-058.jpg

 

of course, this is not a vector, but maybe they will do

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4 hours ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

I really need HMS Queen Elizabeth as a vector drawing for this - I don't really have time to draw it at the moment unfortunately but could certainly play with paint colours on it if I had it

Specify the task, please:
do you need a vector drawing of a ship or only camouflage spots superimposed on a raster image of the ship should be vectors?

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The way I normally draw camouflage profiles - especially when they need iterations - is to have a transparent line drawing as my upper layer and draw two or more colour layers behind. I use these background layers to work purely on camouflage and I can do so without affecting the line drawing. That method allows me to make numerous copies of the whole set of layers if I want to try changing one paint colour for another, and so on.

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12 hours ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

The way I normally draw camouflage profiles - especially when they need iterations - is to have a transparent line drawing as my upper layer and draw two or more colour layers behind. I use these background layers to work purely on camouflage and I can do so without affecting the line drawing. That method allows me to make numerous copies of the whole set of layers if I want to try changing one paint colour for another, and so on.

here I have depicted my hypothesis about the arrangement of colors.

 

1941-color-01.jpg


the link is available for this picture in eps format. I hope you can use it to depict your version

https://mega.nz/file/Ut1FEISI#-Mis_09-t233mYJkOduBtnhZa-0Zm1E1ZiImWlTINZY

 

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