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Inappropriate Company or product names


treker_ed
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On 7/18/2021 at 11:08 PM, Mancunian airman said:

Rumour from my youth has it that the Australian beer that carried the letter four XXXX had to replace what was on the tin because they werent allow to put the word SHXT . . . .

 

Nah it's because Queenslanders can't spell "beer". ;)

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56 minutes ago, Stef N. said:

I thought this was a joke name for comedic effect. Having driven through the village t'other day I can guarantee it exists.

 

 

https://youtu.be/IbmsYBPJLdU

 

 

Village names are fantastic in this part of the world. Just down the road you drive though Fangfoss, immediately afterwards Spittal and then Yapham. I think the Vikings had a way with words.

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Norfolk has a few odd place names pronounced very differently to how they are spelled, see Happisburgh and Costessey for example. It helps to spot the non-locals.😀

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Places which have names ending in -ham are old Anglo-Saxon. Ham derived from 'home-stead' or settlement

Viking places can be noted with the ending 'by' eg Whitby. 'By' also means a settlement or farmstead

Thats also why towns have local laws called 'By-laws', also spelt 'Byelaws'

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5 minutes ago, Jo NZ said:

 

I still like Cold Christmas in Essex.  (Not to mention Good Easter)

That's the one with the spooky old church. My mate thought it would be fun to drive us up there one night.😲

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Posted (edited)

There are an abundance of weird and wonderful place names in the UK. It would seem our ancestors had a definite way with words! Place names that translate into literally like "the place in the crook of the river" or "settlement on the brow of the hill" we have a rich and varied history of place names.

 

However, they can be a little, shall we say, eye opening in this day and age - thankfully the British sense of humour (and history) seems to hold sway and keeps them in place for future generations to have a few giggles!

(the following have been borrowed from https://anglotopia.net/ultimate-list-of-funny-british-place-names/)

 

Back Passage, London

Mincing Lane, London

Mudchute, London

Percy Passage, London

Swallow Passage, London

Trump Street, London

Cumming Street, London

Cock Hill, London

Titley Close, London

Cockbush Avenue, London

 

Cock Lane, Tutts Clump, Berkshire, UK

Golden Balls, Oxfordshire

Hooker Road, Norwich

Moisty Lane, Staffordshire

 

I think we have one of the most wonderful and varied histories of place names. From Saxon, Roman, Celtic, Viking, Norman and everything in-between, such a rich and diverse history.

Edited by treker_ed
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And the there was the new police station to be built in Pig Lane. They changed the name of the road....

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Came across this yesterday and reminded me of this thread. Top-notch facility management services for sure 😂

bm_1snjxx.jpg

 

Cheers

Markus

Edited by Shorty84
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58 minutes ago, Jo NZ said:

And the there was the new police station to be built in Pig Lane. They changed the name of the road....

 

A housing development was built some years ago on an existing road, probably been there since the Norman Conquest, but the new residents applied to the council to have it changed, apparently they didn't like living on Mucky Lane.

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hotel

 

This pic reminded me of an incident a few years ago. Our family had spent a couple of memorable holidays in Bavaria, at Garmisch-Partenkirchen. I later found a beautiful screen saver which displayed a 360 degree rotating panorama from the top of a nearby alpine peak - the W a n k.

I was subsequently investigated by the Health Board as the IT department had become aware of my W a n k Screensaver, and reported me for installing inappropriate material on a Health Board computer!

 

Quack.

(strangely no longer to be found on the GMC list)

 

Incorrect keeps changing W a n k to shandy no matter how often I retype!!

And autocorrect insists on correcting "autocorrect" to "incorrect!"

 

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3 minutes ago, Head in the clouds. said:

Probably not that funny but there is a hamlet in Lincolnshire called 'Wasps Nest', hope the postie carries a ladder.

And not so far away are Labour In Vain Drove (Billinghay) and No Mans' Friend.

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8 hours ago, Black Knight said:

Places which have names ending in -ham are old Anglo-Saxon. Ham derived from 'home-stead' or settlement

@Black Knight similar for place names ending in 'ton', meaning 'an enclosed space' this is also from the Angles, Saxons and Jutes

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Nottingham was originally known as Snotingham in Saxon times, 'the home of Snot', although the spelling in Early English was different. On the A17 in South Lincolnshire is a small village called Saracens Head. 

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I came across another example of a word or similar in one language meaning something different in another when away for a few days about a month ago. Norwich Airport is currently a store for aircraft not in service due to the pandemic. Amongst the aircraft there I saw a couple from a Swedish operator called BRA. 

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On the matter of place names, several years ago I worked with a fellow from America.

 

One day over coffee, a group of us got into a conversation about strange place names and he mentioned a struggle he had trying to get his place of birth on his birth certificate updated as the town had changed it's name at some point after he was born. Apparently they wouldn't let him change it out of concern for accuracy of record keeping.

 

I don't recall what he said the name of the town had been changed to, but on his birth certificate, it said his place of birth was "Grandpa's Knob". It was somewhere in the New England states.

 

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Unfortunate car names:

Audi’ e-tron in French, étron means t-rd

Suzuki LaPuta in Spanish or Portugese la puta is a derogatory term for a prostitute

Mitsubishi Pajero In Spain, its name translates as 'w-nker', so it’s called the Montero there

Ford Pinto in South American Spanish slang, pinto means tiny penis

Nissan Moco in Spanish mocomeans mucus

Chevrolet Nova in Spanish, the words No va translate to It doesn't go

Toyota Isis aimed at the Middle Eastern market?

 

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