Jump to content

1/72 - Beechcraft 200 & 350 Super King Air by A&A Models - B200 released


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

A&A Models is to release in September 2021 a 1/72nd Beechcraft 200 Super King Air kit - ref. 7224

A Beechcraft 350 King Air kit is also expected - ref. 7226

51383815102-64cd5dc1ff-c.jpg

 

Sources: 

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=2464665557011398&id=1048501705294464

https://www.aviationmegastore.com/beechcraft-super-king-air-200-aa-models-aam7224-scale-modelling/product/?action=prodinfo&art=180778

 

213399633-2464664867011467-1232568789522

 

The same in 1/48th please and a complete family of military C-12. 🙏

 

V.P.

 

Matt-Memory2.jpg

Edited by Homebee
  • Like 15
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not wanting to sound like I'm whining but...why not an RC-12D etc.  If they plan on a new fuselage for a 300 that would really be AWESOME!!!  I will buy at least 1 of the 200 for an RAF bird but I'd buy 10 RC-12D etc.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I can finally disable the 15 year long “Saved Search” I had for the RarePlane kit on eBay.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mike Esposito said:

Fairchild Swearingen Metroliner

OMG!  The "screaming tube of death!"  I think I flew on one only once, many, many years ago.  LOL!

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to go OT, but the Garret-powered Metro was/is a noisy aircraft with a tiny fuselage and low ceiling that made the passenger feel as if he/she were flying in a tin can with windows.  The ATR is pretty roomy by comparison!  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, TheyJammedKenny! said:

Sorry to go OT, but the Garret-powered Metro was/is a noisy aircraft with a tiny fuselage and low ceiling that made the passenger feel as if he/she were flying in a tin can with windows.  The ATR is pretty roomy by comparison!  

 

And you have to negotiate the wing spar as well as the low ceiling in the Metro.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Sabrejet said:

Don't RVHP do a line of C-12s?

 

Yes they do - they are good (in my opinion) but, being resin they are quite an expensive way of building up a collection of relatively small twin engine turboprops.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Richard E said:

 

Yes they do - they are good (in my opinion) but, being resin they are quite an expensive way of building up a collection of relatively small twin engine turboprops.

And now difficult to get hold of.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good stuff! The aftermarket troops can start with a sheet that includes markings for the NSW Ambulance Service's Air Wing ...

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Swearingen Metroliner?

 

Ack!  It's difficult for me to put into words just how much I loathed that plane.

 

This, from a ground crew perspective.  Yeah, the airframe's robust - that recent mid-air in Colorado proved that.  And it's apparently an economical plane to operate as I first learned to loathe 'em back in the 80s when they came through the Commuter Terminal ramp at National Airport in DC where I worked as a "ramp agent."  The "human factors engineering" of that aircraft was appalling.

 

One example - of many - was where the engineers first put the receptacle for the ground power cable plug.  It was located on the outboard side of engine number two, right between the prop and the leading edge.  That meant that you had to get up between the leading edge and the spinning prop to unplug the ground power before the aircraft could get going on its flight.  Atrociously bad placement, that.  The fix however, showed just the same level of "intelligence."  They next moved that receptacle to be directly underneath the nose of the plane.  Fair enough.  The protective flap which latched closed over the receptacle was where that next display of "intelligence" was.  To secure that flap closed you needed a screwdriver to turn the little captured bolt into its locked position.  No, your fingers couldn't do it.  You needed a screwdriver.  That implement was about the last damn thing anyone would want to have in their pockets with 'em when out on the ramp around all those aircraft and turbine inlets.  "Brilliant engineering" indeed.

 

Then there was the oh-so-cool door latch handles Swearingen came up with.  On the cargo hold door that handle took the form of a nice long piece of sharply angled metal bar.  You'd press it in at one end and that would pivot the bar to pop the other end out where your thus grab it and rotate it downward to open the door.  The cargo door would then rise itself up on its hydraulics.  The floor of the cargo compartment was at almost shoulder height.  This, thanks to the low wing design of the plane which meant it had tall stalky undercarriage so the props would still clear with the engines mounted on that low wing.  That meant the loading of the plane was a righteous pain.  But that was little when compared to what could - and too often did - happen when you pulled that cargo compartment door closed.

 

Remember that door handle?  The one that's shaped as a long piece of sharply edged metal bar?  And how that handle was popped out at an angle once you opened the cargo door?  Yeah.  Now you're yanking on the pullcord to get that cargo door to come down again and that means that sharply edged metal bar sticking out at an angle from the door is now coming down fast - and is in just the right position to leave it's sharply edged mark in your head.

 

No, I truly loathe the Swearingen Metroliner.

 

I wouldn't mind a good injection molded rendering of one however.  In 1/72nd, of course.

 

But that's not gonna stop my loathing of that plane's design....

  • Like 4
  • Haha 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, 71chally said:

How does an announcement of a new King Air kit run so badly off topic!

We were at least talking about another twin engine prop feeder liner.

 

I hope A&A Models 1/72nd Beechcraft 200 Super King Air kit sells well, so they release more versions of the Beechcraft and other similar aircraft. 

 

The list of air forces and government agencies operating the Super King Air is long and with some interesting colour schemes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Beechcraft_King_Air_operators

 

In Norway, they are best known as the air ambulance - picture by Teemu Pesonen

Lufttransport_B200GTO.jpg

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, 71chally said:

How does an announcement of a new King Air kit run so badly off topic!

"They" started it!!!!  LOL.  At any rate, a friend of mine flew C-12s in the USAF between stints on the UH-1N.  He ended up doing a belly-landing in the C-12 after the landing gear failed to lower, and without scraping a prop blade--just some minor sheet-metal damage and a sheared-off VHF/UHF antenna.  When I asked him about it, he replied: "I just followed the checklist."  I have the photo of the aircraft on its belly.  I think he'd appreciate a diorama displaying the incident, but he'd need to do something really good for me to merit it!

Edited by TheyJammedKenny!
added stuff
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, 71chally said:

How does an announcement of a new King Air kit run so badly off topic!

I take it you're new to being on the Internet?

  • Haha 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Homebee changed the title to 1/72 - Beechcraft 200 & 350 Super King Air by A&A Models - B200 released

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...