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I need something that would help me to smoothly remove excess plastic when I use my PE upgradesets, was looking at dremels, anyone got experience with them and which model would be the best?

 

Also which headpieces would be important?

 

Kind regards IJNfan

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I've always found my Dremel a bit cumbersome and hardly every used it. I purchased one of these last year which I feel is much better for the job.

I'd imagine you'd be able to find a dealer in mainland Europe. 

https://www.premiumhobbies.co.uk/david-union/david-union-handy-router-d550-elite

To go with the supplied tools I purchased this set.

https://www.premiumhobbies.co.uk/david-union/david-union-diamond-burrs-m5001

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I bought a cordless one from the USA on a holiday and found it very useful for cutting metals 90% of the time I use cutting discs in it

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My Dremel is at least 25 years old, if not 30. I have a flexi-shaft attachment and a speed control unit. I can slow it down to just a few rpms and with the flexi-shaft mounted in a vise, I have used it as a lathe.

 

39335201234_580bd6f338_b.jpg

 

 

I also have this assortment of tips to use with the Dremel.

 

50783674418_dce14145fa_b.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Chris

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I have both a Dremel 3000 and a Rotacraft 12v multi-tool.  I wouldn't use either for removing plastic from a model, unless you want to remove very big chunks or are taking off from a very large area that you don't mind obliterating.  I'd stick to using coarse sanding sticks if taking material off to replace with PE.

 

I recently bought a PWM speed controller for the Rotacraft though.  That might help it work reasonably for removing small bits of plastic, but again, I still wouldn't go there.  One slip and...

 

I use my Dremel for cutting thick bits (like clear rod) with a cutting disc (and DIY stuff like sanding wood) and the Rotacraft for drilling holes (although for some reason that's not quite as easy as using an actual drill or pin vice - I feel I need a third hand for adjusting the speed as I go!).

 

Very handy tool to invest in though, I bought both mine with models in mind and I've actually ended up using them more on DIY stuff.

Edited by RobL
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I'm a bit down on Dremel at the moment.  My Li-ion powered one is great for sanding or cutting models, as it can spin quite slowly, but my corded one failed once due to bad design of the winding of the motor, and has recently blown up again for some other reason that I haven't yet diagnosed.  Next time for a corded tool, I'm going to try this Proxxon thing, as although it's a bit more than the equivalent Dremel, it's not as much as the David device used by Mr Moneybags :bling: @tank152

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36 minutes ago, Mike said:

I'm a bit down on Dremel at the moment.  My Li-ion powered one is great for sanding or cutting models, as it can spin quite slowly, but my corded one failed once due to bad design of the winding of the motor, and has recently blown up again for some other reason that I haven't yet diagnosed.  Next time for a corded tool, I'm going to try this Proxxon thing, as although it's a bit more than the equivalent Dremel, it's not as much as the David device used by Mr Moneybags :bling: @tank152

That's brilliant, loving that Mike.

I bought it during their Black Friday sales so was a fair bit cheaper than it is now.

I looked at purchasing one of those Proxxon tools myself as they always get good reviews. However they're the same size as my Dremel so splurged out on the D/U one.

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I got the Dremel multi tool plus the flexi-shaft attachment and the operating rig. Ok for heavy, steady jobs but I ended up going for a fairly cheap hand held cordless rotary tool from Amazon for most of the finer work. I think it was originally intended for nail filing/polishing and is the size of a large pen but that makes it ideal for maneuvering around nooks and crannies and its been instrumental in helping me to precision cut the panels from a Tamiya F-16 and a Hasegawa F-14 to open up the internals. Also worth noting, I make sure to use decent goggles to protect my eyes along with a Force 8 mask, especially when working resin.

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Ok. Hands up....... I recently managed to seize the internals of my Dremel solid. No idea how. Wasn't really impressed by its lack of longevity so I splashed out on this ........

https://www.amazon.co.uk/YEPLING-Cordless-Accessories-Multi-Tool-Polishing/dp/B08B61KR15?ref=silk_bia

......... a ridiculously cheap cheapie from Amazon    (yes, I hate me too).

Surprisingly it has managed to accurately drill tiny holes in some resin sidewinder noddy caps for fitting rbf flags, and the grinder bit has happily chewed off moulded cockpit plastic allowing Eduard etch to take over.

 

I know, I know, it'll never last and it'll all end in tears ........ but they'll be inexpensive tears.

 

I'm not helping, am I ! ?

Q

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30 minutes ago, Nocoolname said:

I got the Dremel multi tool plus the flexi-shaft attachment and the operating rig. Ok for heavy, steady jobs but I ended up going for a fairly cheap hand held cordless rotary tool from Amazon for most of the finer work. I think it was originally intended for nail filing/polishing and is the size of a large pen but that makes it ideal for maneuvering around nooks and crannies and its been instrumental in helping me to precision cut the panels from a Tamiya F-16 and a Hasegawa F-14 to open up the internals. Also worth noting, I make sure to use decent goggles to protect my eyes along with a Force 8 mask, especially when working resin.

That Dremel sounds like the same one as i've got. Does your Flexi Shaft, no sniggering at the back, fit into the chuck of the actual Dremel?

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2 hours ago, tank152 said:

That Dremel sounds like the same one as i've got. Does your Flexi Shaft, no sniggering at the back, fit into the chuck of the actual Dremel?

Yes, it was a bit of a faff to get it working and to be honest I’m more likely to use just the main Dremel these days.

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22 minutes ago, Nocoolname said:

Yes, it was a bit of a faff to get it working and to be honest I’m more likely to use just the main Dremel these days.

Yes, agree with you there, it all seemed a great idea at the time in the shop, but in actual use not so good.

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6 hours ago, Mike said:

Next time for a corded tool, I'm going to try this Proxxon thing, as although it's a bit more than the equivalent Dremel, it's not as much as the David device used by Mr Moneybags

That Foredom tool is a mid-range expense among power tools used by the wooden ship modeling crowd. Take a look at the Byrne's Model Machines table saw and sanders.

 

Personally, I mostly use my Dremel in a Vanda-lay Industries Hold It Plus It plus as a poor-man's lathe. I use a JLC saw, Mission Models Micro-chisels, and Swiss-pattern needle files for any sort of part surgery. Remember, you can only cut or file something smaller...

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On my 1/72 Airfix Hurricane, I used a razor saw to cut out the wingtip light locations. I then superglued in some large chunks of clear sprue.

Using my Dremel set-up, at a low speed, I ground down the clear sprue to very near the proper shape. Next, I used a fine file and sanding sticks, to fully refine the shape.

 

49831221041_fbefb2d7b7_b.jpg

 

 

 

 

Chris

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I made similar parts for my Lysander, but with JLC saw and files.

JRP-finished17.jpg

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10 hours ago, tank152 said:

Yes, agree with you there, it all seemed a great idea at the time in the shop, but in actual use not so good.

LOL - the story of 90% of the tools/gadgets I buy!

 

For me, working in 1/72 I find my Dremel overkill most of the time - good hand tools serve me better.

 

Cheers

 

Colin

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