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Silbervogel Antipodal-Bomber 1/72  AMP via A-market 72014


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Silbervogel Antipodal-Bomber (72014)

1/72  AMP via A-Market

 

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Silbervogel is German for Silver Bird. It was also a design in the late 1930s for a liquid rocket powered lifting body aircraft designed for long rage bombing using sub-orbital flight. To say it was ambitious for the time is certainly right. It was one of the designs considered by Nazi Germany for an Amerkia Bomber. The aircraft was intended to fly long distances in a series of short hops. It was to be launched by beng propelled along a 3 km  long rail track by a rocket-powered sled. Once airborne, it would fire its own rocket engine and continue to climb to an altitude of 145 km, at which point it would be travelling at about 21,800 km/h. It would then gradually descend into the stratosphere, where the increasing air density would generate lift against the flat underside of the aircraft, eventually causing it to "bounce" and gain altitude again; this pattern would be repeated. but because of aerodynamic drag, each bounce would be shallower than the preceding one, even given this the aircraft should have been able to cross the Atlantic, deliver a 4,000 kg bomb to the continental US, and then continue its flight to a landing site somewhere in the Japanese–held Pacific, a total journey of 19,000 to 24,000 km. When there was interest in these spaceplanes  after WWII ex German Rocket Scientist Major-General Dr. Walter Robert Dornberger referred to the aircraft as the Antipodal Bomber as this was more politically correct than "Amerika Bomber" to his then American hosts under project Paperclip.

 

 

The Kit

This is a new tool from AMP part of MikroMir with the sprues and moulding hedging more to the shorter run style. Moulding quality is good with a small amount of flash being present on some parts, panel lines being engraved. There are two major parts for the body along with one major sprue and four smaller ones, and a complete clear nose for the front. Masks (not shown) are also included in the kit. Construction starts with the cockpit (no surprise there). The floor attaches to the rear bulkhead then the seats go in along with the control columns and instrument panels. A surprise here is that the instrument panels and side console details are provided as 3D printed decals. Once the cockpit is finished the wheel bays and and landing gear are made up. For the rear the tailfins and the rocket exhaust are assembled. 

 

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Now construction of the aircraft itself can take place. The cockpit section fits to the main underside part. This is a simple butt join so will most definitely need some internal reinforcement. The wheel bays go in and the rocket exhaust at the back. The single large body part can then go on along with the clear nose.  The landing gear together with the gear doors can then be fitted, followed by the tails and the main wings. There are small tabs to attach the main wings but nothing for the tailplanes, which given the size will need some reinforcement. 

 

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Decals

Decals are in house and look to be fine. Normal crosses are supplied for the tail. 

 

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Conclusion

Its good to see a new tool of this unusual aircraft / Spaceplane in 1/72. This is not a complicated kit but will look the part once built up.  Highly Recommended. 

 

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Review sample courtesy of

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Never heard of this before. Did the Germans have the materials to build this I wonder?

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19 minutes ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

Never heard of this before. Did the Germans have the materials to build this I wonder?

I doubt it, even they shelved it due to its complexity and size.

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51 minutes ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

Never heard of this before. Did the Germans have the materials to build this I wonder?

Apparently their calculations were wrong, and the material design wouldn't have stood up to the atmospheric heating.

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But it was one of their more genuine research avenues.  As opposed to most Luft-46 paper projects which I think were mainly intended to show they were too busy, whenever anyone turned up to give orders for the design team to be given a rifle and sent East!

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It's a nicely done kit.  Few parts and it should go together simply enough.  I'm wondering how much nose weight to put up front there as it is bound to be a tail sitter otherwise.

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