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MFH 1/12 '64 Ferrari 250 GTO


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Sabrejet,

 

Thanks! It's funny to think of the 250 GTO, at this point, as "just another sports racer," what with them selling at auction at $44 million. Imaging the insurance on that...

 

Best,

Andrew

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The work proceeds. The engine is nearly, but not quite done. I fear that I am missing a few tiny pieces needed to finish, so I will have to contact MFH about replacements. For now, here is the engine with the gearbox finally attached (detail and aging not yet done on gearbox). 

 

engine.jpg

 

One general question I do have about the engine is where I might track down something that would work well to simulate the yellow fuel lines coming off the carburetor (pictured here):

 

1961-Ferrari-250-TR-61-Spyder-Fantuzzi-e

 

I believe these may be missing from the kit, and if they're not, then they are done in white metal, and don't look very realistic (I have many duplicate rod and hose-type parts, so it is difficult for me to tell if one that I have is intended to serve as these lines or not). In any event, tubing of some sort would be preferable to a white metal piece. I've looked around on Hiroboy, and it seems that most of the tubing that would work is out of stock. If anyone has other suggestions, that would be great.

 

Since the engine is nearly complete, I have begun to turn to other parts of the kit. Work has proceeded much more quickly on these parts, given how much simpler they are in comparison to the engine. I primed the body with Zero metal/resin primer, but haven't worked up the nerve to paint it yet:

 

primed-body.jpg

 

I also primed and painted the chassis (Tamiya semi-gloss black) and have put some of the additional elements on it together:

 

chassis.jpg

 

I have painted and put together the rear live axle, plus scuffing it up and aging it a bit:

 

full-rear-axle.jpg

 

rear-live-axle.jpg

 

Built and painted the radiator:

 

radiator.jpg

 

And, finally, put together the rotors and brakes for the front wheels:

 

rotor.jpg

 

rotor-closeup.jpg

 

To get a nice circular wear pattern, I simply put the axle into the mouth of a drill, where a bit would go, and spun it around while alternately holding a brass wire brush to it and the back of a scalpel blade. I weathered it with Tamiya brown panel line accent color and bits of the rust I made earlier.

 

Lots of elements are beginning to come together; this kit remains a joy to work with. Thanks to all for reading.

 

Best,

Andrew

 

 

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Very nice work !

 

For the tubing : I would use copper wire. A large diameter for the core and a small diameter that you wrap around the core. Secure both ends with a drop of CA glue. The tubing remains flexible, so you can bend it into any shape you want.

 

Or you can go for this type of tubing. I would make that sort of tubing by wrapping very small strips of tape around a copper core.   :

 

 

 

 

Sincerely

 

Pascal

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May I suggest you look at page 12 on my 312T thread Andrew.

If you scroll down near the bottom...you will see a very similar hose that I made...and a description of how I made it.

The technique is simple...and once you have it shaped to your needs...it can then be painted yellow.

 

Hope this helps :)

 

Ron

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Surgically neat work make those kit details pop. Tips from the experts above will put the model in another realm.

My 2 Cents worth is your philosophy of the build. Very apropos to your career. :)

Before going into patina or wear, decide; do you present a concours $44 Million gem? Or a vintage raced classic just off Goodwood or Silverstone circuits? Until you have definitive idea, go easy on aging.

 

Much will be unseen unless in your photo records. :weep:

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Pascal,

 

Thanks very much, for the kind words, and the advice on the tubing. Much appreciated!

 

Best,

Andrew

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19 hours ago, silver911 said:

May I suggest you look at page 12 on my 312T thread Andrew.

If you scroll down near the bottom...you will see a very similar hose that I made...and a description of how I made it.

The technique is simple...and once you have it shaped to your needs...it can then be painted yellow.

 

Hope this helps :)

 

Ron

 

Ron,

 

Thanks for this; the tube you created is stunning. I will experiment with that and perhaps try the copper wire approach Pascal suggested too and see which one I am able to pull off more convincingly. I fear I might not be able to duplicate your results; I will try though.

 

Your feedback is, as always, greatly appreciated.

 

Best,

Andrew

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17 hours ago, Codger said:

Surgically neat work make those kit details pop. Tips from the experts above will put the model in another realm.

My 2 Cents worth is your philosophy of the build. Very apropos to your career. :)

Before going into patina or wear, decide; do you present a concours $44 Million gem? Or a vintage raced classic just off Goodwood or Silverstone circuits? Until you have definitive idea, go easy on aging.

 

Much will be unseen unless in your photo records. :weep:

 

Codger,

 

Much appreciated. My thinking with the car was that it was a raced classic that has been well maintained with good upkeep, but definitely not a concours gem. So, some wear and tear from age and regular use.

 

Thanks, as always, for the support and insight.

 

All best,

Andrew

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9 hours ago, Sabrejet said:

Lovely to see this coming along. I just wish I had the space for more MFH kits :)

 

Sabrejet,

 

Space and money! These kits are pricey, but I feel like I have already gotten more than my money's worth in terms of enjoyment and learning experience, and I'm not even close to being done. Mr. Hiro (or Hiro~san as they would say in Japan) has really put together something special with this company.

 

Best,

Andrew

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11 minutes ago, Octavian said:

 

Ron,

 

Thanks for this; the tube you created is stunning. I will experiment with that and perhaps try the copper wire approach Pascal suggested too and see which one I am able to pull off more convincingly. I fear I might not be able to duplicate your results; I will try though.

 

Your feedback is, as always, greatly appreciated.

 

Best,

Andrew

 

Your very welcome Andrew :)

 

Here is another option...(they have other sizes).....https://prime-miniatures.co.uk/content/course-simulated-conduit-19mm-brass-colour-45cm

 

Ron

 

 

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DUH! Ron's link just reminded me that guitar strings (wound wire) are perfect match for his example and your needs! I have much of it in many various sizes, long forgotten!

EDIT: Here it is on long-ago built 1/12 935:

P5150028-Custom.jpg

Edited by Codger
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The engine looks fantastic and when you getvthe hoses sorted it will elevate it even higher.  Nice to see the body and some work on chassis and running gear too.

Great work. 

Chris

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On 7/20/2021 at 11:35 AM, Codger said:

DUH! Ron's link just reminded me that guitar strings (wound wire) are perfect match for his example and your needs! I have much of it in many various sizes, long forgotten!

EDIT: Here it is on long-ago built 1/12 935:

P5150028-Custom.jpg

 

Codger,

 

Yeah, guitar string is a great idea; I doubt I would ever have thought of that. Very clever solution! Thanks.

 

Best,

Andrew

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello,

 

My apologies for a lengthy absence from this thread; lots of work and family commitments this summer have been taking up my time. That said, I have managed to get a bit done on the 250 GTO.

 

front-suspension.jpg

 

The front suspension and control arms gave me a good bit of trouble. Some of the design choices here by MFH were a bit puzzling to me, in particular the screws meant to hold the arms to the front axle unit; they were a bit too short and weren't biting into the white metal sufficiently to get a solid hold. So, I had to be a bit creative and ended up drilling deeper into the vertical shaft of the axle and gluing some worn drill bits in there that could then connect up through the control arms, giving it more of a solid hold. None of this should be construed as a slight against MFH's engineering; most likely the fault was my own in implementing their intentions. Whatever the case, I finally got them together. Lots of clean-up and detailing here is still needed.

 

tubing.jpg

 

Here is how I ended up doing the gas line; the guitar string worked very well, I think. It ended up a bit longer than I think it ought to be, but it took many attempts to get it done, so I have decided to leave well enough alone, and not make the perfect the enemy of the good. Thanks to everyone for the wonderful suggestions on how to render this fuel line.

 

engine-side-view.jpg

 

After getting the front suspension and fuel line done, the momentous step of attaching the engine to the chassis. Again, more clean-up and detailing work is needed here. Here are a few more angles on it:

 

engine-wide-view.jpg

 

engine-top-view.jpg

 

And, last but certainly not least, I have done a few coats of Zero Paints Rosso Chiaro on the body. I did the doors and hood and such as well, but I will just post the body for now:

 

body-painted.jpg

 

body-painted-front.jpg

 

Since Zero Paints go on mat, it doesn't look that impressive yet; once it is clear coated with their magical 2K elixir, the color will brighten up a bit, and it will (hopefully) have a nice, glassy sheen. There's decals in there too to worry about, but I won't get ahead of myself. Any suggestions on the body (or the chassis) as it now stands are very welcome; my understanding of Zero Paints is that the base color should be somewhat rough so that the clear coat can effectively key to it. I don't know if what I have here is too rough in spots though, so please don't hold back with any suggestions.

 

I hope everyone is well; thanks for reading.

 

All my best,

Andrew

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Here are a few pics of the chassis and the various elements coming together:

 

full-chassis.jpg

 

rear-chassis.jpg

 

front-end-8-9.jpg

 

Everything is pretty messy right now, and it all needs a lot of touch-up and detail paint work.

 

I don't know. Personally I enjoyed building the engine far more than doing these body elements. The larger white metal elements are very difficult to work with and fit together correctly. I'm moderately pleased with the results so far, but the flaws all seem pretty glaring to me. It's been a bit discouraging, to be honest. But I will keep at it; hopefully it turns out ok.

 

Thanks for reading,

Andrew

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If I may Andrew,

it's very easy to get discouraged on any build...as you will have seen from my own comments on the 312T build...and flaws will always stand out more prominently to the builder than the viewer.

Looking at your last picture for instance...the two exhaust pipes on the right are obviously not in their correct positions...however...that only stood out as a genuine oversight...not poor workmanship.

Indeed...in one pic on my own thread...a spring on a rear damper is not seated properly...so...take heart...none of us is immune to such unintended errors.

Personally...whilst you feel only 'moderately' pleased with your efforts...many others would be over the moon with them...as should you IMHO.

Touch ups and detail work are all part of modelling...one of the most frustrating aspects of a build...especially when trying to match previous finishes or effects...and can be difficult when dealing with assembled parts.

Working with white metal can  be a 'double edged sword'...a lot of clean up...easily bent/broken/damaged etc. ...however...it can produce superb results...a bonus being the realistic weight when finally assembled.

As for your point about enjoying the engine more than other aspects...this is common to many builders...myself included...as this one area can make or break a complex kit/build.

Early on I said to you that you should regard this build as a learning tool/experience which...to my eye at least...you have done to very good effect.

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Posted (edited)

Ron,

 

I truly appreciate your kind words. I am probably being too hard on myself; as I noted at the beginning, this kit is a big step up from anything I have done before. And, as you advised me, I should treat it as a learning opportunity, and I have definitely learned so much already from it. Plus, I really have enjoyed it, albeit with some frustrating moments.

 

I know you only mentioned the exhaust pipes as a point for illustration, but you are absolutely right about those right two. Try as I might I just could not get the white metal to cooperate such that it met correctly at the bottom with the lower pipe, and also plugged into the heads correctly. It was that struggle in particular that was getting me frustrated with the build. I got it somewhat close there, and decided to stick with it, because I was afraid that any further attempts to reshape would result in breaking the white metal (which I did on the other side, but fortunately was able to mend decently).

 

Thanks again; your guidance and kindness is always greatly appreciated.

 

Best,

Andrew

Edited by Octavian
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3 hours ago, Octavian said:

Ron,

 

I truly appreciate your kind words. I am probably being too hard on myself; as I noted at the beginning, this kit is a big step up from anything I have done before. And, as you advised me, I should treat it as a learning opportunity, and I have definitely learned so much already from it. Plus, I really have enjoyed it, albeit with some frustrating moments.

 

I know you only mentioned the exhaust pipes as a point for illustration, but you are absolutely right about those right two. Try as I might I just could not get the white metal to cooperate such that it met correctly at the bottom with the lower pipe, and also plugged into the heads correctly. It was that struggle in particular that was getting me frustrated with the build. I got it somewhat close there, and decided to stick with it, because I was afraid that any further attempts to reshape would result in breaking the white metal (which I did on the other side, but fortunately was able to mend decently).

 

Thanks again; your guidance and kindness is always greatly appreciated.

 

Best,

Andrew

 

We all do it Andrew...self reproach is a common trait in modellers...and figure painters...I speak from much experience.

Enjoyment is a key word...and the primary function of any hobby...however...it goes hand in hand with frustration...but can be tempered with the learning aspects...it's a fine balancing act mate.

 

A shame indeed about those exhaust pipes...again...as the saying goes...there's no harm in making a mistake as long as you learn from it...which I am sure you will have.

 

Many of us who take on these complex builds...can never be sure how they will turn out...you just never know what's waiting to trip you up...but again...all a part of the fun.

Stick with it...learn from it but...always try to enjoy the challenges it throws your way...nothing worthwhile is easy mate.

 

Regards

 

Ron

Edited by silver911
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Andrew, I go through the same mental process with every single kit I build. Posting a work in progress here was helpful in accepting errors, imperfections, etc. One of the things that drew me back to modeling a few years ago was the need to have an outlet for my detail orientation that didn't *really* matter. At the time, my job required that I work fast and balance perfection with hitting deadlines. Building car kits and developing the related skills is a realm where I get to control how much to pursue perfectionism without consequences of not delivering at work. 

 

On a more practical level, I've been trying to keep a simple build and a complex build going at the same time. It keeps me a little less nuts. To balance a 1/12 MFH kit I'd probably need something really simple--like a 10 piece jigsaw puzzle. 

  

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2 hours ago, silver911 said:

 

We all do it Andrew...self reproach is a common trait in modellers...and figure painters...I speak from much experience.

Enjoyment is a key word...and the primary function of any hobby...however...it goes hand in hand with frustration...but can be tempered with the learning aspects...it's a fine balancing act mate.

 

A shame indeed about those exhaust pipes...again...as the saying goes...there's no harm in making a mistake as long as you learn from it...which I am sure you will have.

 

Many of us who take on these complex builds...can never be sure how they will turn out...you just never know what's waiting to trip you up...but again...all a part of the fun.

Stick with it...learn from it but...always try to enjoy the challenges it throws your way...nothing worthwhile is easy mate.

 

Regards

 

Ron

 

Ron,

 

Words of wisdom, my friend. Thanks for this perspective; truly appreciated.

 

1 hour ago, Michael Church said:

Andrew, I go through the same mental process with every single kit I build. Posting a work in progress here was helpful in accepting errors, imperfections, etc. One of the things that drew me back to modeling a few years ago was the need to have an outlet for my detail orientation that didn't *really* matter. At the time, my job required that I work fast and balance perfection with hitting deadlines. Building car kits and developing the related skills is a realm where I get to control how much to pursue perfectionism without consequences of not delivering at work. 

 

On a more practical level, I've been trying to keep a simple build and a complex build going at the same time. It keeps me a little less nuts. To balance a 1/12 MFH kit I'd probably need something really simple--like a 10 piece jigsaw puzzle. 

  

 

Michael,

 

Thanks very much for your kind words. Like Ron said, it is a tough balancing act between enjoying it and pushing oneself to do perfect work, and its a balance I am still figuring out how to strike. I like the suggestion of having a simple project alongside a complex one. I may indeed return to a half-finished Fujimi Porsche I have sitting around, just to have something a bit less stressful on the side. Thanks for the advice!

 

All best to both of you,

Andrew

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Posted (edited)

Ron,

 

Just by way of clarification, I think that the exhaust might look worse in that picture than it actually is. The open gap there is intentional, as there is still a single pipe left to insert there. Here is a detail pic:

 

exhaust.jpg

 

So, the far two are "sort of" seated where they are supposed to be, and an additional single pipe will be added in there. They are still off, but I realized looking at the picture above that it might have seemed like I missed those two holes entirely! (Quite possibly all of this was already obvious to you, but I wanted to clarify in case the first picture was misleading; it's still a bit of a mess, to be sure).

 

Best,

Andrew

Edited by Octavian
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Hi Andrew,

I knew the centre gap was due a pipe to be fitted...my concern was the right end two as said...which...to my eye...look as if they are 30 - 40 degrees out (clockwise rotation) as you look at them.

This may or may not cause a further problem when adding that centre pipe.

 

Although too late for this build...a tip for your next battle with exhaust pipes...especially the white metal variety...but applies equally to plastic or resin...some gentle heat will help prevent breakage when bending/adjusting the fit.

Perhaps the most important tip I can offer you on this particular aspect of any build is...ignore when the instructions say you should add the exhaust system.

By this I mean...take the earliest opportunity to 'pre-fit' them you can...the ideal time being when you have the chassis and basic engine block assembled...you can use 'blu tack' to hold the engine block in place whilst doing the test fit.

Obviously...you have to constantly refer to the instructions...to check where any other parts of the engine may later interfere with the exhaust pipes...and allow for such.

 

The above applies to many stages of any build...the golden rule being...'never trust the kit instructions'...and don't expect the parts to fit first time...ever!

 

I do like the surface finish on the exhausts mate...spot on :)

 

Ron

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